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Eric Honour

Kansas City, MO         

Devoted to exploring and furthering the intersections of music and technology, Eric Honour’s work as a composer and saxophonist has been featured in numerous international conferences and festivals like ICMC, Spark, FEMF, BEAF, EMM, and others. A member of the Athens Saxophone Quartet, he performs regularly in Europe and the United States, and has presented lectures and masterclasses at many leading institutions in North America and Europe.

Honour’s music has been described as “fast, frenetic, and fiendishly difficult” and performed around the world by such notable artists as Quintet Attacca, Winston Choi, the Thelema Trio, Krista Martynes, Mauricio Salguero, and Quartetto Musicattuale. His work as a composer has been recognized in many competitions, published by Roncorp, and recorded on the Capstone, Ravello, and Innova labels. Professor of music and director of the Center for Music Technology at the University of Central Missouri, his work as an audio engineer and producer appears on the Innova, Centaur, Ravello, Irritable Hedgehog, Orpheus Classical Music, Everview, North Star Appli, and E.M.E. Action labels, as well as on numerous independent releases.

Quirk for bass clarinet and computer

In much of the music I write, the title comes first and has tremendous impact on the resultant score. When I set out to write a piece for bass clarinet and computer, the word “quirk” came to mind. Something about the sound of it reminds me of the low notes of the bass clarinet, particularly when played with slap-tongue. Messrs. Merriam and Webster define “quirk” as “a peculiar trait.” For me, the word always carries a further, slightly negative connotation, as if these idiosyncratic traits are just a little bit dirty.

neither from nor towards (for clarinet, baritone saxophone, and piano)

An extended rhapsody for unusual – and beautiful – instrumentation. Appears on the Innova CD of the same title by Belgium’s Thelema Trio.

here is no water but only rock (for saxophone quartet)

Reflecting part of Eliot’s “The Waste Land,” in the quartet “here is no water but only rock,” the music is arid – especially in the opening section – and searches futilely for stability and comfort. It achieves a sort of stability and trajectory in the end, through appropriating the rhythms and energy of rock music, but mixed with a grating, dissonant, aggressive sense of harmony, which offers no succor or release.