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Time forever dividing itself toward innumerable futures

French horn score to site-specific choreography, exploring tensions in classical ballet/modern dance, natural/unnatural, and past/present.

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Time is forever dividing itself toward innumerable futures

Posted on October 2, 2019 by Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

On June 19, 2019, as part of the River To River Festival, an original score by composer Ted Hearne premiered in a new work by Pam Tanowitz, entitled Time is forever dividing itself toward innumerable futures. Tanowitz’s piece – the first site-specific work she has presented – was in collaboration with New York City Ballet principal Sara Mearns. Taking place outdoors in Battery Park City’s serene Rockefeller Park, an ensemble of Pam Tanowitz Dance regulars and New York City Ballet guests performed the twenty-minute work on a loop that night for an audience of 350.

The performance scheduled for June 18 was unfortunately rained out, however, it did serve to heighten the anticipation for the performance on the 19th. It was lightly raining on June 19, but just as the performance began, the drizzle settled into a beautiful white mist that enshrouded Rockefeller Park and created a soft intimacy binding the dancers and audience members and grounding the focus to all present.

Beginning at 7:45pm, groups of dancers started the performance together and separated into smaller groups or pairs over time. Some audience members moved throughout the park to follow dancers while others stayed slightly farther away to observe more at one time; depending on how closely an audience member wanted to stay near specific dancers, not only could audience experiences differ from person to person, but an attendee could have a different experience at each performance of the work that evening. The dancers and the audience moved around the space together in waves. At times, the dancers moved with grace and meditation, while other times they were full of energetic force, power and intention. Always in a pair or a group, the dancers relied on one another for artistic support. This democratic format was a great point of importance to Sara Mearns who, as a New York City Ballet principal dancer, is accustomed to a more traditional and heirarchical format to dancing and being observed.

Ted Hearne’s original score placed the warm, resonating sound of French horns (played by Rachel Drehmann, Daniel Salera, Kate Sheeran, and Colin Weyman) in juxtaposition with the electronic sounds of processed vocals (Ted Hearne) and electric guitar (played by Taylor Levine) – binding the experience together through uneasy discord.

Overview

On June 18 and 19, 2019, as part of the River To River Festival, an original score by composer Ted Hearne will premiere in a new work by Pam Tanowitz, entitled Time forever dividing itself toward innumerable futures. The first site-specific work the choreographer has presented, Tanowitz’s piece is a collaboration with New York City Ballet principal Sara Mearns. Joined by an ensemble comprised of regulars and New York City Ballet guests, the group will become part of the tranquil landscape of Rockefeller Park in Battery Park City. Tanowitz will explore the tensions between the legacies of classical ballet versus modern dance, the natural world versus the unnatural, and the past versus the present. In a nod to her mentor, David Gordon’s Muybridge Solo will be embedded within the choreography.

The 20-minute work will be performed twice each night, featuring dancers Sara Mearns and Taylor Stanley, courtesy of New York City Ballet, and Reid Bartelme, Jason Collins, Zachary Gonder, Victor Lozano, and Melissa Toogood. Hearne’s original score will feature five musicians and himself as vocalist. The instrumentation will include four French horns, electric guitar, and voice with live electronic processing. The music explores and enhances the themes and tensions discussed above, using the warm, blended, old-world sound of the French horns as a bed, canvas, and even provocateur, for the electronically-powered sounds of electric guitar and processed vocals.

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (LMCC) has been producing and presenting the River To River Festival — the most important annual public arts festival in Lower Manhattan — for over a decade. The promotional strategy around this premiere will use a multi-pronged approach, and include a festival-wide press release, e-blasts to our mailing list of 50,000+ subscribers, campaigns across our social media channels, media in national, regional, and local news outlets, direct mailings to targeted individuals and organizations throughout Manhattan, and public relations in partnership with the PR firm Sacks & Co. Closer to the performance dates, the dancers and musicians will have access to LMCC’s rehearsal space at 125 Maiden Lane and to Rockefeller Park, in preparation for the performance run.

In keeping with the Festival ethos and tradition, all performances of this work will be free and open to the public, sparking the imaginations of hundreds of audience members, made up of residents and visitors alike. The funds from New Music USA will go towards the commissioning, rehearsal, and performance fees for Hearne and the musicians.

Project Media

Furtive Movements
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Features: Ted Hearne

Composed by Ted Hearne, recorded at Oktaven Audio. Ashley Bathgate on cello, Ron Wiltrout on drums/percussion.
Selected by Hearne as an example of propulsive and varied instrumental work that melds a variety of stylistic influences.

Letter to my Father
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Features: Ted Hearne

Colorado Public Radio Classical hosts Roomful of Teeth in the CPR Performance Studio on January 17, 2017.
Ted Hearne’s Letter to my Father (4th movement), from Coloring Book. Conducted by Brad Wells.
Selected by Hearne as an example of his vocal writing.

By-By Huey
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Features: Ted Hearne

Composed by Ted Hearne, for six instruments. Performed by eighth blackbird.
Selected by Hearne as an example of propulsive and varied instrumental work that melds a variety of stylistic influences.

Start and End Dates

06/18/201906/19/2019

Location

New York, New York

1 update
Last update on October 2, 2019

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In Collaboration With

composer
Los Angeles, California

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