2013-2014 YEAR IN REVIEW (cover page)

New Music USA


2013—2014
YEAR IN REVIEW

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Dear Friends:

New American music is flourishing. One glance at the artists and work represented in this booklet will make that clear. From projects like Invisible Cities and Song of the Jasmine, to organizations like Roomful of Teeth and the Center for New Music, those in the field recognize this moment as one in which old ideas about “classical” music do not limit the range of adventure and creativity happening now. The music of our time is whatever we want it to be.

Many have paved the way, from Jack Dejohnette to David Lang to Juan Orrego-Salas. But individual artists in isolation can only do so much to foster a culture that appreciates new music. For that reason, a few composers came together in 1939 to form the American Music Center, and later in 1974 a few others formed Meet The Composer. Those artists were acting out of a need to create opportunities not just for themselves, but for all living American composers. Through a broad series of programs over the last 70 years, many of the dreams of those organizations have been realized. And yet, our dreams are so much bigger than the resources at hand.

Simply put, there is far too little funding available for artists and the ensembles and presenters who bring their work to the public. At New Music USA, we are privileged to distribute endowed funds specifically designated to support exciting new music in America. Through New Music USA project grants, we created a simple and streamlined way to request funds for new music projects. In doing so, we opened the doors to applications from a wide range of artists. While we are incredibly proud of the projects that we were able to fund, the process has made us more aware than ever of the great needs of our field. It is a testament to the strength and vitality of this community that artists are able to accomplish so much with so little, but we can and must do more.

As you read through the 2013-2014 Year In Review, you will notice that our activities have a singular focus: to build awareness of, and advocate for, the broad range of new music that is being created across this country. Whether through project page updates, or a NewMusicBox article that gives a local issue national scope, we seek to grow an energetically networked community around new American music. Showing the strength and vibrancy of our community through this network is a powerful way to increase opportunities for all.

Please join us in this community! Create an account on newmusicusa.org, follow a project, create a profile, sign up for our email newsletter, and participate in a conversation on NewMusicBox. Our horizons are only as expansive as we are united.

Enjoy the music!

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

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This year has marked the beginning of a new chapter in our organization’s history. We have consolidated five of our previous grantmaking programs – Commissioning Music USA, Composers Assistance Program (CAP), CAP-Recording, Live Music for Dance, and Creative Connections – into a single, flexible program that allows us to serve more of the field, and to serve it well. This new program – dubbed simply as New Music USA’s project grants – combines developments in our grantmaking and technological infrastructure to fulfill the changing needs of 21st–century artists.

The evolution begins with an increased openness and flexibility in our grantmaking. By awarding more than $645,000 to 117 projects this year alone, we are supporting hundreds of composers, instrumentalists, presenters, choreographers, dance companies, and organizations from around the United States that are moving new American music forward. These awarded projects range from commissions and recordings involving small and large ensembles to interdisciplinary works featuring music along with dance, theater, film, sculpture, and even architecture and puppetry. As a whole, the funded projects span and eschew genre categories, pushing the boundaries of classical, jazz, and electronic music and venturing bravely into new, unfamiliar territory. Presenting artists and organizations with a simplified and generalized platform with minimized restrictions allows us to identify and fund these envelope-expanding projects, which may otherwise fall through the cracks.

Financial support of these projects is just the beginning. The launch of the project grants also marks the opening of a new chapter in public advocacy for new music. Each awarded project has its own project page, which can be updated by the project participants as it unfolds. These project pages form a gallery that provides a snapshot of the entire field of new American music, a mecca for music enthusiasts and a point of entry for new audiences. Visitors may create user accounts, follow projects of interest, and sign up to receive updates from artists. Through the project grants gallery, newmusicusa.org is positioned to become a venue for the public to discover and engage with the diverse range of American voices creating music today.

In reimagining our support for artists as an act of curation, we have created a streamlined and elegant web-based custom user platform – of a caliber typically associated with large technology companies – entirely in-house. By presenting applicants with a simplified grantmaking platform, we have opened the door to a wider range of new music projects that accommodates the needs of 21st–century artists. This web interface, which includes both public-facing project pages on newmusicusa.org as well as online application submission and panel review mechanisms, operated glitch-free through record-breaking submission traffic. We believe that this achievement has laid the groundwork for many longer-term developments, which will help us solidify the project gallery as a hub for the new American music community.

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For the past fifteen years, our online media hub NewMusicBox has consistently dove below the surface to produce deep, award-winning coverage and content that resonates at the heart of the new music community. We’ve published thousands of posts about new music in America, including hundreds of articles and videos, and all of it is still available online; a living history of a decade-and-a-half of American music that is available to everybody who has internet access.

The depth and investigative rigor of these conversations has made NewMusicBox the go-to source for hardhitting American new music journalism, and the site is frequently cited by larger publications in their coverage of our field. Our articles about the field and profiles of composers will remain important in the years to come. In fact, the Yale University Library’s Oral History of American Music (OHAM) has worked with us to archive and preserve many of our artist profiles for future study and reference.

To celebrate the occasion of our fifteenth anniversary, our editors rummaged through the archives, providing a year-by-year reflection on the lessons of our past. “Admittedly, we uncovered broken links and some dated graphics,” writes Molly Sheridan, executive editor of NewMusicBox, “but much larger messages transcended those cosmetic wrinkles – lessons from the artists we’ve spoken with about success and frustration, cash and creativity, living to make music and making music to make a living.”

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We’ve all heard houses speak: stairs creaking, floorboards thundering under our feet, appliances drumming, lamps buzzing. But what if the structures in which we take refuge and relax – the places where we start and end our days – actually became the tools for music making? New Orleans Airlift, a multi-disciplinary arts producer, has answered just this question. Inspired by “the twin pillars of New Orleans culture, Music & Architecture,” the group salvaged the remains from neglected old houses and built an entire village of musical structures: “Stairs became pipe organs, floorboards became amplifiers,” writes The Huffington Post. “In some cases the entire structure was an instrument itself.”

The village, dubbed The Music Box, A Shantytown Sound Laboratory, was the subject of widespread intrigue and critical acclaim. NPR’s Ann Powers commented: “High concept and nontraditional as it may be, The Music Box has found a place in the long history of New Orleans music.” An immensely diverse cast of leading artists including Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Andrew WK, Ben Jaffe (Preservation Hall Jazz Band), Mannie Fresh (Cash Money Records), and Dickie Landry (founding member of Phillip Glass Ensemble) performed at The Music Box for more than 1,500 people, a third of them students, and many additional hours were reserved for the public to visit – and play – the village.

Fresh off the heels of The Music Box, New Orleans Airlift has launched a new, traveling musical village called Dithyrambalina. With the New Music USA project grant awarded in February along with additional funding, the village of musical structures will visit communities across New Orleans and potentially, the broader United States. “Imagine waking up to singing houses at the end of your block!” they write. So far, the village has taken up residence in Shreveport, LA, and presented performances involving dozens of artists, musicians, and dancers. “The most important thing to us is the idea that old, run-down looking things still have value,” New Orleans Airlift and Dithyrambalina co-founder Jay Pennington has said. “And that the value that they have is in the stories that they carry. And those stories can be brought to life through music, giving life to architecture, so that people can live with it, experience it, and learn what there is to learn from what’s left behind.”

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Published on NewMusicBox – January 1, 2014

Composer-vocalist Lisa Bielawa radiates a contagious and infectious energy; being around her makes the impossible seem possible. She’s also an organizer; in 1996, she co-founded MATA, a festival commissioning and celebrating work by young composers. NewMusicBox’s Molly Sheridan sought out Bielawa for a Cover Profile interview, which touched on the rewards of collaboration, the composer’s large-scale works – including a massive piece for 800 musicians on an airfield – and getting the party started:

Collaboration for me means that you’re beholding the amazingness of some other person and what they can do. Then I’m using my own abilities as a composer to make that shine or to engage with it. That’s a really great way to know people in the world, right?

It’s inconvenient for me sometimes that I end up wanting to write pieces for hundreds of musicians on an abandoned airfield. But it’s even more inconvenient to try to fit into certain assigned ways of making work that don’t fit. So I’ve accepted that I have to make it work for myself and the best way for me to do that is to go ahead and see things in terms of the larger picture and in terms of broader strokes – whether or not an individual performance or composition is seen that way. I need to see it that way in order to make it work for me and in order to make the best work I can.

But that’s also kind of what I do, too. I want to go somewhere and I start a party. I get the party going. Then, when the party is at its fullest, I like to sneak away and start another party somewhere else. I wrote it into the piece, and I didn’t even realize I did that. I don’t know why that is. Leaving a party at its height – that’s heartbreakingly beautiful – and then you go somewhere else. That’s my role. I start fires, you know, and then I leave.

 

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Christopher Cerrone’s Invisible Cities is unlike any opera you’ve ever witnessed. It’s a new kind of immersive experience, brought to you via state-of-the-art wireless Sennheiser headphones as you freely roam through LA’s historic Union Station (or wherever they decide to do it next). It’s been heralded as “a delicate and beautiful opera” that “could be, and should be, done anywhere” by the Los Angeles Times; “a subtle and beautiful musical meditation on travel, cultural differences, death, and memory” by LA Weekly; and even called “the opera of the future” by Wired Magazine. And, to top it all off, the piece was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Music this year.

Critics aren’t the only ones who have been amazed by Invisible Cities. Crowds of people have gathered for more than 22 sold out performances. They’ve also shared their experiences widely on social media, including nearly 1,000 photos posted to Instagram alone.

We are pleased to have been one of the first organizations to lend grant support to this unique opus, first with a grant from our Composer’s Assistance Program last year, and then again with a project grant this year supporting a recording of the opera with the full original cast. The album will be released this fall by The Industry, the producer of the original production, as their first step into the realm of recorded music, with additional distribution through Record Union. It will also be available at every performance from Invisible Cities’ upcoming international tour. Pick up your copy when it comes out, grab your headphones, and listen on the go: you’ll see the opera that’s playing out all around you.

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Published on NewMusicBox – September 23-27, 2013

As the summer came to a close and school began to re-enter many of our minds, NewMusicBox hosted Education Week, an intensive, week-long marathon dedicated to exploring the new technologies and fresh learning methods that are advancing music education, inside and outside of the classroom. The focus on the topic was site-wide, and almost all content shared on NewMusicBox that week from our regular contributors (and some special guests) was part of the conversation. This was our first extended period of producing content devoted to a single theme, and it allowed our editors, columnists, and readers to immerse themselves in the issue through input from multiple voices.

Topics ranged from the relationship between contemporary pedagogy and participatory culture (“Inviting Possibilities for New Music and Music Education”) to the idea of reversing damaging habits of mind ingrained by a previous instructor (“Unteaching”). The pros and cons of everything from employing expedient untruths in music education (“On Lying to My Students”) to the normalizing of music education (“Standards and Creativity”) were discussed. There was even a “modern music alma mater” composed for us to all sing together (“Hail to Thee, and Sing Out!”).

“While maverick music makers who build their art well outside traditional institutions were certainly not invented in 2013, advances in technology have multiplied and publicized the myriad routes students may follow,” writes Executive Editor Molly Sheridan. “In parallel to the ways we’ve seen the boundaries of genre blur and meld, education and career paths have been derailed and resurfaced; others have completely gone off road. So how do you get to be a new music composer or performer today? How do you connect with the music and grow as a listener?”

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The New York Times critic Nate Chinen observed “a moment of deep, transfixing confluence between the composer and his partners for the evening” during the New York premiere of acclaimed composer-pianist Vijay Iyer’s piece Time, Place, Action, written for the Brentano String Quartet. “It arrived in a largely improvised second movement, as a single sustained note slowly morphed into something as layered and ephemeral as a rolling cloud bank. Mr. Iyer’s first piano chord brought a bolt of clarity, and with it a blush of instant communion.”

Iyer’s aim with Time, Place, Action, which was created with support from a New Music USA project grant, is to put “the spirit of real-time invention in dialogue with the meticulous interpretative art of the string quartet”:

What the two approaches have in common is a focus on the experience of sound in time; the priority in both cases is not only the articulation of form, but also a heightened attention to moment-to-moment interaction and the flow of aural sensation. That zone (between score and experience, let’s say) is where this piece is meant to dwell.

In creating the work, which was co-commissioned and premiered on March 14 by the 92 Street Y, Iyer drew inspiration from flocking, an improvisational form of dance in which “a group takes its collective cue from a leader, like birds in migration.” The piece invests agency in the performers to animate the notated passages – which are designed to maximize resonance and are propelled by Iyer’s singular gestural language – with their own spontaneous decision making. “By highlighting the intentionality of the soundmaking process,” writes Iyer, “I strive to embrace each performer’s selfhood.”

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Published on NewMusicBox – May 28, 2014

When the critic Eugene Holley, Jr. first heard the term “jazz police,” he thought it was “one of the many linguistic inventions and dimensions spawned by musicians – one of many verbal turns of fancy that have weaved in and out of the jazz lingua franca from New Orleans to Manhattan.” As time went on, however, he came to realize that the term had a more sinister connotation, resting in the idea that a conspiracy of critics and insiders control access to the commanding heights of the jazz world.

In “Profiling The Jazz Police,” an article that sparked a flurry of on- and off-site comments, Holley breaks apart the notion of such a secret society. He argues that, especially given today’s democratized information sharing paradigms and jazz’s waning popularity, critics and musicians can and should work together in the interests of the field at large:

A critic could write that a musician’s new CD is not his or her best work, but a few clicks and you can hear for yourself whether you agree with the writer’s opinion. A consumer can also share his or her opinions about any musician with other like-minded listeners in an instant. This type of democratized discourse did not exist thirty years ago, and I suspect it’s here to stay. And while sites like Facebook and Soundcloud feature fan reviews and accessible sound files, respectively, the democratic accessibility of that data does not guarantee that opinions offered by fans are any less biased than the professional critics. We are still in the Wild West stages of this phenomenon. And while writers and record companies have been taken down a notch, their digital demotion may be a pyrrhic victory, because it still rings with the spirit of ‘us’ versus ‘them.’ And nobody wins that contest these days.

Today, in an age where all jazz artists in America are underrated, musicians should know that, in my opinion, the overwhelming majority of jazz scribes and other individuals in the jazz infrastructure are there to help them, and, more

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“For each immigrant artist, the struggle to cross the cultural barrier presents great challenge and opportunity,” writes choreographer Nai-Ni Chen. “Each person finds a way to adapt and improvise on [her/his] own, creating [an] imprint of movement, language, and thought patterns along the way.”

Seeking to create a work exploring the transmigratory experience, Chen reached out to composer Huang Ruo, a fellow émigré. Their collaboration, Crosscurrents, will take the form of a fifteen-minute work featuring seven dancers and four musicians within a context fortified by sound, stage, choreography, set, and lighting design. The focus of the work will be the imprints described above: the physical and psychological byproducts of the highly individual experience of negotiating identity within a new culture. Chen and Ruo will work together this summer to synthesize a vocabulary of sound and movement inspired by this experience, which will serve as the foundation for the development of the piece (to be premiered in 2015).

Song of the Jasmine, a collaboration between choreographers Aparna Ramaswamy and Ranee Ramaswamy and composer-saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, is also centered on navigating the bicultural experience. Drawing inspiration from the transformative work of the Bhakti poets, who “redefined notions of the self by reconceiving spirituality apart from established ritual” in medieval India, the artists unite their unique perspectives in an exploration of American identity, global citizenship, and the divine. Premiered at the Walker Art Center in May, Song of the Jasmine was also a recipient of the National Dance Project Award.

Movement and sound are inextricably linked, and dance and music have a long and fruitful history of exchange to show for it. We supported both the creation of and the live music for Crosscurrents and Song of the Jasmine, and target funding every year to help ensure the continuation of this dialogue between composers, performers, choreographers, and dancers. In particular, we seek to enable the presentation of well-rehearsed, new live music during dance performances, which is frequently otherwise impossible due to financial restrictions. “Dancers hear music differently,” Mahanthappa explains. “They don’t deal with music like musicians do, regardless of the fact that this tradition is obviously so tied to music and tied to rhythm. It’s been really different so it’s fun to try to get inside of that too…it’s a whole interactive process between all ten of us.”

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Published on NewMusicBox - April 16, 2014

We first heard about the pianist-composer Aaron Parks when he was a teenager, but a lot has happened since then. Parks, who just turned 30, has matured musically as well, and has released albums of his own music on the storied Blue Note and ECM imprints. He has also collaborated with a broad range of artists on the stage and in the studio ranging from improviser-composers Kurt Rosenwinkel and Terence Blanchard to South Korean-born vocalist Yeahwon Shin and CANT, the solo project of Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor. We caught up with Parks for a Spotlight Session, in which we discussed the importance of reaching both the mind and the body in music, Arvo Pärt, and inhabiting the music fully as a performer:

I like music and I like songs and I like sounds. … I like to put myself in situations where I’m a little bit out of my comfort zone. I do also want to have some sort of entry point to the music, though. I want to be challenged all the time, but I don’t want to only be challenged in my head. So music which is purely cerebral, or feels that way to me, I don’t tend to have quite as much of an attraction towards. But if it’s cerebral and I can dance to it, or it makes me feel something, there’s more of a chance.

One of the problems with the scene today is everybody is so busy doing so many different things. Most people are pretty proficient at doing a lot of things; you can give somebody some music and they’ll read all of the notes and it’ll be great. But then they’re onto the next gig. I don’t want music to just be information like that. … There’s a focus on being an individual; you’ve got to do your own thing at all costs, being original so to speak. But they focus on that one particular side of what original means. Originality is not only creating something new, it’s also having authentic presence – being fully present in the interpretation of what you’re doing. … I want people who can play a part – inhabiting it fully – and make me believe a melody. I don’t want you to play the melody; I want you to sing it to me. That’s a rare thing.

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It is hard to overstate the impact of the current wave of small ensembles and organizations on the new music field. These trailblazers are bringing irreplaceable vitality to America’s musical landscape, giving voice to our living composers, organizing and mobilizing world-class performers, and engaging a whole new generation of listeners.

New Music USA remains firmly committed to these small, dynamic outfits, even as the general operating support they desperately need is growing scarcer than ever before. By making unrestricted investments in these organizations, we enable them to continue their intrepid programming, enhance their presentation, and pioneer new, unconventional means of sharing new music with a greater community.

Over the last fiscal year, we awarded more than $201,500 in general operating support to 41 New York City-based small ensembles and organizations through our Cary New Music Performance Fund, which supports innovation and excellence in new music programming: presenting, commissioning, recording, and performing music by living composers. The roster of singular organizations currently supported by our New Music Performance Fund includes the New York chapter of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), a longstanding and historic collective of innovative composer-performers dedicated to presenting world premieres of each other’s original works; Mantra Percussion, an ensemble exploring the art of percussion through interdisciplinary collaborations and works that push the boundaries of the classical music concert format; Metropolis Ensemble, a professional chamber orchestra dedicated to making classical music in its most contemporary forms with today’s most outstanding emerging composers and young artists; and Wet Ink, a New York-based ensemble commissioning, promoting, and organizing adventurous American music, while giving composers an open platform for their work that encourages artistic integrity and authenticity.

Most recently, the vital support we provide through the New Music Performance Fund has been made possible by a generous six-year gift from the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, which closed in 2009. New Music USA is deeply committed to the continuation of the New Music Performance Fund and the support of grassroots new music groups, not just in New York but also throughout the United States. As we reach the end of the Cary Trust funding period, our belief in the vital importance of the grassroots of new music is as fervent as ever. We plan, over the course of the next 18 months, to explore all possibilities for doing everything we can for this sector of the new music world.

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Published on NewMusicBox – January 22, 2014

Money is a thing seldom discussed in new music journalism, despite the prevailing assumption among large segments of the general public that creating art is a luxury activity. In “The Shame of Poverty and Investing in the Future,” composer Joseph Hallman shares his personal struggles with poverty: growing up as a “functional orphan,” unable to afford basic necessities – let alone musical equipment – Hallman worked tirelessly to refine his craft, seeking to transcend his situation in the pursuit of his dreams. This article, which was shared widely and liked on Facebook close to 400 times just from our original post, ends with the following appeal to the community at large:

It is my hope, first of all, that no one – especially young musicians – should ever face the shame and the self-questioning that poverty could force on them. Young, poor musicians: take heart! Music, and more importantly access to music and music education, is vital to all communities, not just the wealthy. Second, it is my intention that each of us should understand the difficulties faced by impoverished music students. I urge all who are capable to invest in the future via young musicians. There is no reason to expound here on the virtues of music and music education. (That would be preaching to the choir, I know!) But without the support of the many folks who gave me a helping hand, either via donations to local music programs or directly to me for music fees, I would likely not be in the position I am in today. We must come to understand as a field the responsibility each of us bears to determine the best way to support young musicians of diverse socio-economic classes – it need not even be monetary! – and to then make it happen. And thanks to each and every one of you beautiful people who have supported and continue to support young musicians.

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Published on NewMusicBox – June 24, 2014

When our Chicago Regional Editor, the violinist and writer Ellen McSweeney, got wind that the Beethoven Festival had announced its fourth annual program, she was stunned. She, like many local musicians, had still not been paid for her participation in last year’s festival. In a piece for NewMusicBox that received a record-breaking 10,000 views and close to 2,500 Facebook likes within a day of publication, McSweeney examines the circumstances that allowed this to occur:

For me, the story of the Beethoven Festival is a story of vulnerability: my own individual vulnerability, that of my colleagues, and that of our entire musical community. Much of the most artistically adventurous work in Chicago isn’t unionized, and we take a leap of faith every time we work for each other. Usually, that trust is rewarded, and professional and collaborative bonds are formed that allow us all to thrive. … The community is indeed held together by trust, respect, and not much else. If circumstances like these are kept secret, it threatens the security and well-being of every musician in our city.

But was it the correct choice for us to remain silent, ostensibly to help the festival right itself? …The consequences of our silence go beyond when, or whether, we ever get paid. While we were being nice and patient and quiet, a whole new roster of musicians from throughout the U.S. agreed to play for the 2014 festival. At the very least, the national community should have known that these debts remained unpaid, so that they could have made an informed decision about whether to participate. These individuals, met with the uproar of the past weeks, now face the difficult decision of whether to withdraw.

 

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Not long ago, the composer Gregg Wramage was on a plane from Chicago to Newark, recalling the milestones he had achieved in the past week: a successful first-time collaboration with a great conductor, Renée Baker, and her Chicago Modern Orchestra Project; a powerful and well-received new version of his most popular piece; and a chance to share his love of new music with young and enthusiastic students. Wramage had just participated in the latest iteration of our Music Alive program’s New Partnerships initiative, which cultivates new relationships between emerging composers and orchestras through one-week residencies.

The visit marked the first time that Wramage’s music had ever been performed in Chicago. The piece was a new edition of In Shadows, In Silence – which, according to the composer, is his most popular work – expanded from its original sextet configuration for a 20-piece chamber orchestra. “In the months before I began work on the piece I realized that my memories of earlier periods of my life were most strongly stimulated by shadows and silences,” explains Wramage. “As I started to sketch the work, shadows and silences acted as portals through which I would pass from the world of the present into the world of the past.”

We believe that the bond between orchestras and living composers, though historic, is hardly a thing of the past. The rich history of Music Alive, a program that we co-administer with the League of American Orchestras, showcases how that relationship is constantly evolving; since its inception, the program has supported 127 residencies involving 110 composers and 78 orchestras, with awards totaling $4.1 million. In addition to New Partnerships, Music Alive also has a Principal Residency component, which supports extended, two-year collaborations between composers and orchestras. The most recent of these multi-year awards were made last year. In addition to enabling emergent composers to continue pushing the boundaries of this storied musical format, the program also turns the attention of orchestras towards the living artists within their midst, which is critical to their long-term vitality.

Music Alive is another way for us to help situate composers within communities: in concerts and rehearsals, in public appearances and in the media, and in schools and community spaces. Wramage writes, “I hope that the time Renée and I spent with these young musicians will be of some use to them as they move through their lives, musical and otherwise, and that perhaps the next time I return to Chicago, some of them will be playing in Renée’s orchestra and working with me on my latest piece. For me, that would make this a truly successful residency, and ‘new partnership.’”

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The Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble (ECCE) and the Contemporary Portland Orchestra Project (CPOP) have a lot in common: both are community-focused ensembles that were founded by performers and composers under the age of 30, and both have a deep interest in presenting works by living, local composers.

For the past two years, the groups have presented separate programs at Portland’s annual March Music Moderne festival. This year, a New Music USA project grant helped them join forces, bringing together 27 performers from two cities to present a program of work by 15 Oregon-based composers. Strengthening the bonds between new music communities is critical to ensuring the continued vitality of our field: it encourages organizations to share ideas and resources, build audiences, and work together to reach new artistic heights. We were thrilled to see the organizers of this project reaching even further outward at every turn: partnering with the Community Music Center in Portland and building community participation pieces into their programs. “We believe that the strongest lasting connections in music are made by performing together,” they write, “[t]he rehearsals, the concerts, and of course, the celebrations with our audiences after a successful program.”

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In addition to our regular editorial staff, NewMusicBox maintains a team of columnists who engage readers in lively discussions of issues facing the field. However, in an effort to keep pace with the myriad ideas and issues vibrating through our field, we have been inviting two new columnists to join us each month this calendar year. So far, these fresh voices have brought a new slate of diverse perspectives to the site, stimulating conversations on new topics and engaging our base while drawing in new readers.

In January, Adam Sliwinski – percussionist, conductor, educator, and member of SO Percussion – contributed widely-shared pieces on creating and nurturing satisfying artistic relationships: “What made them work? Are there general principles that can be applied to the process of collaboration? When and how does a professional relationship transcend the purely transactional?” Framed largely through the lens of his experience with SO, Sliwinski’s posts provide practical advice to performers and composers on how to build momentum together:

We were furiously ambitious to make a career as a chamber group, but there was an incredibly small extant repertoire to draw from. Making deals with our friends to generate new repertoire and seeking out other composers was what we needed to do to survive! We didn’t have Beethoven to fall back on, so we leapt headfirst. … We had to play new pieces as if they were old. Which is to say, as if we needed them to be good in order for our work to matter. The incredible thing is that sending composers the message that their work was essential to our existence drew stunning, visionary results out of many of them. Whether there was commission money involved or not – there has been, as often as possible – our mutual benefit equilibrium was optimum. We needed repertoire as badly as they needed others to be committed to their work.

Monika Herzig, a jazz pianist and educator, came on board for a “Women In Jazz” series in March. In addition to detailing her own experience, her posts gave shine to unsung female trailblazers within the field, and asked tough questions about the “masculine image of jazz, sexual stereotypes of instruments, behavioral and social differences between males and females, and sexual discrimination”:

Once I started looking, I discovered women such as Carla Bley, Jessica Williams, Geri Allen, Joanne Brackeen, Mary Lou Williams, Myra Melford, Regina Carter, Shirley Scott, Melba Liston, and many more with established and blossoming careers. Being part of a group gave me the confidence to proceed: to pursue a doctorate under the tutelage of David Baker at Indiana University; to lead my own groups on more than a dozen recording projects and tours around the world; to write music that received a DownBeat Award and that has been featured in television shows; but most of all to teach the following generations to do the same and get their voices heard. I did not find the stories of my role models in textbooks though; I had to seek them out and ask questions. Why are these trailblazers not included in our history canon?

In collaboration with the New York Philharmonic, we hosted Sean Shepherd, The Phil’s inaugural Kravis Emerging Composer, for coverage of the NY Phil Biennial. “Parsing it all out is also what I’m trying to do for now,” Sean wrote in his first post. “I’ll be going to nearly every event and will be reporting here on what I’m hearing and seeing – and what it all might mean for composers, and even for music, at a juncture such as this.” With the full weight of the Phil’s PR machine behind it, this campaign provided a gateway for new readers into the world of NewMusicBox while briefing our devotees on the happenings of the Biennial:

I was excited by what I heard and saw: some dazzling performances of new repertoire and the galvanized atmosphere of a happening. Professionals from as far as London and Los Angeles popped their heads in and seemed to be enjoying themselves as much as anyone else. Holders of the Biennial Pass (a golden key to every event) began to recognize each other and band together at intermissions and at après-concert events for conversation. Composers both young and not-so were out and about: in droves at the large concerts in Avery Fisher Hall; in trickles for other events. … Still, as exciting as it was this year, the most significant element of the biennial may be already stored away in the attics, waiting for 2016 (or ’18, or ’26) to be fully unpacked. Its potential as a driver and supplier of new projects and new music was (understandably) only just lightly tapped this year, with most pieces being US/NYC premieres as opposed to commissions. And yet, last week amounted to a floodgate of new music being opened: from a few new subscription-series pieces per season from major figures and some encouragement to young talent by way of CONTACT! commissions, the Philharmonic and partners performed well over 60 pieces from composers of all stages and many walks of life.

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“I composed Jim Crow’s Tears to encourage people to reflect on the tragic times in our history in order to learn from them,” writes Detroit-based jazz trumpeter Kris Johnson. “I also want[ed] to pay tribute to those who endured dark periods in our nation[’s past] and fought to implement change,” he continues. “We will not advance unless we study our history.”

Jim Crow’s Tears shares a story that needs telling. Through the story of one man, the musical sheds light on the context surrounding blackface minstrelsy, the conditions that gave rise to it, and the enduring mark it has left upon our collective conscious. Composed and written by Johnson with the help of a book by Gary Anderson of Detroit’s Plowshares Theater, the work features six ensemble members, an eleven-piece jazz ensemble, and an eight-piece chamber orchestra.

The musical had its premiere in April 2013 at Art-X Detroit, a free concert series presented by the Kresge Arts Experience. This year, New Music USA provided support to ensure that this important work was documented on a high-quality audio recording. The album version will be released to the public and used to secure further performance opportunities, allowing the piece to continue to inspire audiences to interrogate our shared past.

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Over the past year, NewMusicBox has been a leading contributor to a passionate dialog about music, gender, and creative careers, inviting columnists, composers, and our readership to voice their thoughts on the matter through columns and comments. The composer Alex Temple picked up that thread in “I’m A Trans Composer: What The Hell Does That Mean,” offering insight on “what it’s like to be a composer on the trans-female spectrum in the early 21st century.” We reposted that piece on NewMusicBox, which led to an even further flurry of conversation on social media platforms.

Life experience, social conditioning, and biology can all affect a composer’s music, but those things vary enormously among men as a group and among women as a group, and how people react to them artistically is idiosyncratic and unpredictable. … That said, I have noticed that certain specific attitudes toward music seem to correlate with gender. In particular, it seems like nearly every composer-performer whose work depends on an intense, profound, almost mystical relationship with the artist’s own body is a woman; and nearly every composer who sees music as a purely abstract, formalist construction, free of emotional, social, psychological, or political meaning, is a man. Given how our society is put together, the existence of those correlations shouldn’t come as a surprise. But I don’t feel any connection with either of those points of view, and my own approach to music, which has to do with cultural history and the fuzzy boundary between humor and horror, doesn’t seem to be a particularly gendered one.

While I don’t think of my work as specifically female, I do think of it as specifically genderqueer. Just as I often feel like I’m standing outside the world of gendered meanings, aware of them but never seeing them as inevitable natural facts like so many humans seem to do, I also tend to feel like I’m standing outside the world of artistic meanings. The discourse surrounding music tends to take certain value judgments for granted, although
the value judgments vary with the musical style being discussed: complexity is better than simplicity, or emotional expression is better than cerebral formalism, or change is better than repetition, or raw authenticity is better than glitzy artifice, or whatever. But when I look at the world of music, I see an elaborate, sometimes gloriously absurd game, in which all of those rules are arbitrary conventions.

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When Two x Four – a project of violinists Jennifer Koh and Jaime Laredo in collaboration with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the IRIS Orchestra, and the Curtis Institute – commissioned composer Anna Clyne to write a companion piece to Bach’s Concerto in D minor for Two Violins, Clyne focused her attention on lineage. Specifically, the composer was captivated by the relationship between the two violinists; Laredo has been a mentor to Koh since she began studying with him at the Curtis Institute.

The resulting work, titled Prince of Clouds, is a Baroque-style tour de force centered on exchanges between the two soloists. The Chicago Tribune describes Koh and Laredo “trading and meshing phrases like champion relay runners…it’s the first concerto [Clyne has] ever composed, and it’s a winner.”

Once the West Coast premiere concert was scheduled, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra reached out to us to enable them to bring Clyne to town for a series of outreach events. These kinds of activities continue to be a vital component of our work, along with other support available through our project grants. As a result of this support, the composer was able to make key contributions to pre-concert discussions, give an interview to the Los Angeles Times, and host an intensive education program with students in the LACO’s Meet the Music program. 700 of those students were also given a sneak peak of the performance prior to the premiere, and 100 students from local youth music programs received complimentary tickets to the show.

Clyne’s presence also helped to make the West Coast premiere a smashing success. Donna Perlmutter of the LA Observer praised the “wondrous new piece,” while Mark Swed of the Los Angeles Times remarked, “It is lovely music, slightly too lovely and thus interrupted by harshness. Brutal, raspy percussive interludes appear suddenly, like slashes of the knife on the music, but sweet melody always returns, swooping with ever more determination. There is never resolution. Balance is gained, lost and regained, never maintained.”

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Published on NewMusicBox – April 1, 2014

Many revere Juan Orrego-Salas as the greatest living Chilean-born composer. However, the nonagenarian took up residence in the United States before most of us were born, and his work reflects that duality. Orrego-Salas has also been a tireless advocate for other composers and was the founder of the Latin American Music Center.

At 95, Orrego-Salas is the oldest person we have ever interviewed for NewMusicBox. “We constantly get to people at the beginning of careers and also at the midcareer stage,” remarks Frank J. Oteri, NewMusicBox’s senior editor. “Here’s someone who has stopped composing…this was the first person we interviewed who was able to reflect on a complete body of work.

The Cover Profile focuses on the composer’s life and work, his move to the United States and the foundation of the Latin American Music Center, and a few incredible (and hilarious) stories of his interactions with Aaron Copland, who was his teacher:

Aaron Copland was waiting for me in the station where you come from New York to Tanglewood. And he had reserved for me a room and so on. It was very nice to see him again. And he said to me, ‘Well, I’ll tell you, this afternoon you have a rehearsal of your Sextet. But I’ll have to pull your ears because you did a very naughty thing with the Sextet.’ What did I do? I was very frightened, you know. ‘You end pianissimo. You should never end pianissimo a work at your age because you need applause, and they never applaud pianissimo endings.’ ‘Well I’m sorry, because it’s written already.’ Okay, he sat with me at the premiere, and when it ended, there was a big applause. I said, ‘I am sorry. You are right, and I’m wrong.’

When I saw Aaron Copland for the last time, it was here. Sitting here. Perhaps in this chair. He had one of my granddaughters sitting in his lap. And I asked him suddenly, ‘Aaron, what are you writing?’ He looked. ‘Nothing. I’ve written all what I had to write.’ And that said a great thing for me. I know that Aaron had written everything that he had to write. And I was starting to feel that I had written also what I had to write. I had nothing more to say in music.

 

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At New Music USA, our mission is to serve as advocates for new American music. We do that not only through our grantmaking and media programs, but also as a representative in national and international music networks. New Music USA represents the United States as a member of the International Association of Music Information Centers (IAMIC) and the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), and is one of 13 members of the Performing Arts Alliance, which brings together nationwide performing arts advocates.

This year, our President and CEO Ed Harsh and Composer Advocate Frank J. Oteri traveled to Europe to the ISCM’s World New Music Days 2013 and IAMIC’s 2013 Annual Meeting as American representatives. Ed also attended IAMIC’s Winter Meeting in 2014. Additionally, both Ed and Frank participated in administering EarShot, a program developed collaboratively by the American Composers Orchestra, the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, and New Music USA. EarShot helps orchestras around the country to identify and support promising composers in the early stages of their careers. Frank represented New Music USA at the EarShot readings in Detroit, while Ed gave a professional development presentation on “Support Structures for Composers” as part of the “Earshot Under Construction” program in Berkeley. Both Ed and Frank were panelists for the American Composers Orchestra’s Underwood New Music Readings, while Director of Grantmaking Programs Scott Winship served on the 2014 MATA Festival’s “Business of Being a Composer” panel. Ed also attended the PAA board meeting in New Orleans, which included a public session with local artists focusing on their potential power as advocates for the arts at all levels of government: local, state, and national.

In collaboration with the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), New Music USA organized three meetings of small new music ensembles and arts organizations based in New York state. Held in New York City and Syracuse, these convenings fostered interconnectivity and dialogue between the organizations while providing them with the opportunity to voice their needs to the organizers. Our goal is to gather results from these meetings and use them to design and implement a technical assistance project, which will address the needs of small new music ensembles and organizations.

PROJECT GRANTS

92Y Concerts Presents New Music by Vijay Iyer
New York, NY

A Commission and Regional Premiere of The Radio Hour by Jake Heggie
Minneapolis, MN

Abandon Fear
Boston, MA

American Notes – a musical exploration
New York, NY

American Power: Mitch Epstein and ErikFriedlander Commission/World Premiere
Minneapolis, MN

American Voices: New Choral Works
San Francisco, CA

An Afternoon with Jennifer Higdon, composer
Fort Worth, TX

Andrew Norman: Play
Boston, MA

Bach Unwound
New York, NY

being Here…/this time
New York, NY

Big Fun
Charleston, SC

Birmingham New Music Festival
Birmingham, AL

Bonhoeffer- A Choral-Theater work by Thomas Lloyd
Philadelphia, PA

Boston Counterpoint
Boston, MA

Branches: So Percussion performances and residency at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Chintimini Chamber Music Festival Commission/Residency
Corvallis, OR

Cinderella: A New Score for a Restored Silent Film
Houston, TX

Commission: On the Mutability of Time
Minneapolis, MN

Court/Garden (CG)
New York, NY

Crosscurrents
Fort Lee, NJ

Crossing Boundaries: New Music for Dance in China
Beijing and Guangdong, China

David Lang’s ‘love fail,’ with Anonymous 4
New York, NY

David Ludwig Violin Concerto Consortium Commission
Burlington, VT

Dithyrambalina
New Orleans, LA

Divertimento #4 for Piano
Quartet Moab, UT

Double Jeopardy (2013) for octet, commissioned by Ensemble Proton Bern
Bern, Switzerland

Dry Spell
St. Paul, MN

Echoes, Westminster Performing Arts Center, Bloomfield College
Bloomfield, NJ

Edgefest 2014: BAS(S)ically Sound
Ann Arbor, MI

Elicit Inquest
Easton, PA

Emerging Composers Partnership 2014-15
Chicago, IL

End of the World
San Diego, CA

Europa: new piano work by Jonathan Howard Katz
Chicago, IL

FALL
Lambertville, NJ

Four Pianos Festival at JACK
Brooklyn, NY

From The Mountains: Hazel Dickens in Baltimore
Baltimore, MD

Ghosts of Crosstown
Memphis, TN

g-h-o-s-t-c-r-o-w-n(working title)
New York, NY

Glimpse 2
New York, NY

Global Concertos for Soloist and B’shnorkestra
Seattle, WA

Grant Park Music Festival Presents World Premiere and Composer Residency with William Bolcom
Chicago, IL

Heritage/Evolution: PRISM Quartet with Ravi Coltrane and Chris Potter
Philadelphia, PA and NYC

High Zero Festival 2014
Baltimore, MD

HOMEMADE NEW WORKS
New York, NY

I will remember everything
San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley, CA

ICElab
New York, NY

Illuminations
Evanston, IL

Ima Ima – (L’dor Vador) by The Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble
New York, NY

In the Garden of Sonic Delights
Katonah, NY

INVISIBLE CITIES: FIRST COMMERCIAL RECORDING
Los Angeles, CA

iv: contemporary American music for electric guitar
San Francisco, CA

Jack DeJohnette’s Made In
Chicago, Chicago, IL

Jenny Scheinman and H. Lee Waters | Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait
Durham, NC

Jim Crow’s Tears
Detroit, MI

Joe McCarthy’s Afro Bop Alliance Big Band presents the music of Roland Vaquez, Paquito D’ Rivera and Friends
Washington, DC

KcEMA Happy Hour
Kansas City, MO

Kepler Quartet’s CD3 |completing the 10-quartet Ben Johnston cycle
Milwaukee, WI

Kojo Roney residency at JACK
Brooklyn, NY

L@TE: Pauline Oliveros
Berkeley, CA

Look and Listen Festival Premieres Toy Piano Works by Jo Kondo and Phyllis Chen
New York, NY

MATA JR.
New York, NY

Memory Rings
New York, NY

Metamorphosis Trilogy
New York, NY

Middlemarch in Spring
San Francisco, CA

Music for Contemplation
Brooklyn, NY

Music From China’s 30th Anniversary and Beyond
New York City, NY

Music in their Words
Allendale, MI

New guitar concerto by Clarice Assad
San Francisco, CA

New Music for Viola d’Amore
Treviso,Italy

New work for electric guitar by Davide Ianni
Boston, MA

New Works for the Open-Hole Bass Flute
Chicago, IL

NHSO Artist Residency in the Community with Chris Brubeck
New Haven, CT

Sunstruck Mobile
New York, NY

Philadelphia Freedom Festival
Philadelphia, PA

Pittsburgh Opera: American Opera Composer Residency
Pittsburgh, PA

Predator Songstress: Dictator,
Seattle, WA

Prince of Clouds West Coast Premiere
Los Angeles, CA

Puhutawi: A New Traditional Hopi Sound
Grand Canyon, AZ

Reconstructed: The New Americana
Boston, MA

Riverside Whistles and Bells
Riverside, CA

Roomful of Teeth
North Adams, MA

Roscoe Mitchell New Quintet – Vision Festival XX World Premiere
New York, NY

Roscoe New Opera Workshop
Saratoga Springs, NY

Schuller to Schnyder: A Third Stream Exploration
Chicago, IL

Schulmeister/Pàmies Collaboration at ANODE 2014
New Orleans, LA

SKETCH 4
San Francisco, CA

Snow
NYC and Cherry Valley, NY

Soundwave ((6)) Water
San Francisco, CA

Studio Recording of Bobby Previte’s TERMINALS
New York, NY

Table of Silence Project 9/11: Musician Fees
New York, NY

Tectonics: Brooklyn
Brooklyn, NY

Ten Thousand Birds
St. Louis, MO

The Acoustic Bicycle Tour (West Coast)
CA

The Blind Men and the Elephant by Julie Bour with Commissioned Score by Kyle Olson/Live Music by Violinist Gillian Rivers
New York and New Jersey

The Dither Extravaganza! 2014
Brooklyn, NY

The Gaita and Orchestra Commissioning Project
Worldwide

The Hunger
St. Louis, MO

The Immersive Early Music of Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

The Parable of Otto John
Los Angeles, CA

The Poe Project:Embedded and Buried Alive
Fargo, ND

THE POTATO KING OF BLOCK 72
San Francisco, CA

The Source
New York, NY

The Space Between Us, for 8 strings, and robotic percussion instruments
Seattle, WA

Sunstruck
New York, NY

The Sweetest Song: Traditional Song Genres and Their Performance in Brooklyn
Brooklyn, NY

The War Project
San Francisco, CA

Thingamajigs Exhibit @ Center for New Music
San Francisco, CA

Turbine (working title)
Philadelphia, PA

Unforgettable: A disc of the music of George Tsontakis
Troy, NY

Uniting New Music Communities in Oregon
Portland, OR

Voices from the Dust Bowl
Chicago, IL

We Won’t Be in Love Much Longer
Seattle, WA

Wet Ink Ensemble- Relay / TEXTUREN Tour
Lucerne, Switzerland

Punching The Clock
Lancaster, PA

Wuorinen: Orchestral works, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Levine/Serkin
New Rochelle, NY

Zazzi and the Trees of Omburo
Saratoga, CA

Zeke Suite
Appleton, WI

ORGANIZERS

10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

92nd Street Y
New York, NY

a canary torsi | Yanira Castro,
Brooklyn, NY

Afro Bop Alliance
Washington, DC

Alarm Will Sound
New York, NY

Albany Symphony
Albany, NY

Karim Al-Zand
Houston, TX

American Lyric Theater (ALT)
New York, NY

Amy Seiwert’s Imagery
San Francisco, CA

Arts for Art
New York, NY

Ashley Bathgate
New York, NY

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Berkeley, CA

Beth Morrison Projects
New York, NY

Birmingham Art Music Alliance
Birmingham, AL

Philip Blackburn
St.Paul, MN

Samantha Boshnack
Seattle, WA

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Malden, MA

Bridge Records
New Rochelle, NY

Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC)
Brooklyn, NY

Buglisi Dance Theatre
New York, NY

Taylor Ho Bynum
New Haven, CT

Cantaloupe Music
Brooklyn, NY

Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Inc.
Katonah, NY

Center for New Music
San Francisco, CA

Christopher Cerrone
Brooklyn, NY

Phyllis Chen
Astoria, NY

Yafonne Chen
San Francisco, CA

Chicago Jazz Philharmonic
Chicago, IL

Chicago Philharmonic Society
Chicago, IL

Winston Choi
Chicago, IL

Danmari – Yass Hakoshima Movement Theatre
Montclair, NJ

Degenerate Art Ensemble
Seattle, WA

Jack DeJohnette
Woodstock, NY

Dither
Brooklyn, NY

Duke Performances
Durham, NC

Max Duykers
Brooklyn, NY

Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble
Eugene, OR

Fifth House Ensemble
Chicago, IL

Giacomo Fiore
San Francisco, CA

Marjani Forte
New York, NY

John Glover
Brooklyn, NY

Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble
Allendale, MI

Grant Park Music Festival
Chicago, IL

Sean Griffin
Los Angeles, CA

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Lawton Hall
Milwakee, WI

Harvestworks
New York, NY

Howard Hersh
Nevada City, CA

High Zero Foundation
Baltimore, MD

International Contemporary Ensemble
New York, NY

ISSUE Project Room
Brooklyn, NY

Jack Arts, Inc.
Brooklyn, NY

Kristopher Johnson
Detroit, MI

Kansas City Electronic Music and Arts Alliance
Kansas City, MO

Kepler Quartet
Milwaukee, WI

Friedrich Heinrich Kern
New York, NY

Kerrytown Concert House
Ann Arbor, MI

Kitka, Inc.
Oakland, CA

Kurtis Lamkin
Charleston, TX

Leah Stein Dance Company
Philadelphia, PA

Mu-Xuan Lin
Los Angeles, CA

Lorelei Ensemble
Cambridge, MA

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
Los Angeles, CA

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

Keeril Makan
Cambridge, MA

Marion Walker
Reno, NV and Seattle, WA

MEDIATE Art Group
San Francisco, CA

Moab Music Festival
Moab, UT

Music at the Anthology, Inc. (MATA)
New York, NY

Music From China
New York, NY

Musiqa
Houston, TX

Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company
Fort Lee, NJ

New Haven Symphony Orchestra
New Haven, CT

New Orleans Airlift
New Orleans, LA

New Thread Quartet
New York, NY

Nimbus Dance Works
Jersey City, NJ

Meg Okura
New York, NY

Opera Memphis
Memphis, TN

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
New York, NY

Cristina Pato
New York, NY

Christopher Patregnani
Saratoga Springs, NY

Phantom Limb Company
New York, NY

Pittsburgh Opera, Inc.
Pittsburgh, PA

Robert (Bobby) Previte
New York, NY

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
New York, NY and Philadelphia, PA

Trevor Reed
Hotevilla, AZ

Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Riverside Art Museum
Riverside, CA

Roomful of Teeth
New York,NY

Dominique Schafer
Los Angeles, CA

Andrew Schloss
Seattle, WA

Kathryn Schulmeister
Chicago, IL

Allen Shearer
San Francisco, CA

Erik Spangler
Baltimore, MD

RoseAnne Spradlin
New York, NY

Brandin Steffensen
New York, NY

Stephen Petronio Company
New York, NY

Maarten Stragier
Brussels, Belgium

Marc Teicholz
San Francisco, CA

The Cliburn
Fort Worth, TX

The Crossing
Philadelphia, PA

The Mann Center for the Performing Arts
Philadelphia, PA

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Third Rail Projects
New York, NY

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Burlington, VT

VocalEssence
Minneapolis, MN

Volti
San Francisco, CA

Jeremy Wagner
Berkeley, CA

Walker Art Center
Minneapolis, MN

Laura Watts
Easton, PA

Wet Ink Ensemble
New York, NY

Tyler Wilcox
Brooklyn, NY

Randall Woolf
Brooklyn, NY

Netta Yerushalmy
New York, NY

COLLABORATORS

Bard College Conservatory of Music
Annandale on Hudson, NY

ENSEMBLE MISE-EN, INC.
New York, NY

Face the Music
New York, NY

JACK Quartet
New York, NY

Look and Listen
Brooklyn, NY

Lorelei Ensemble
Cambridge, MA

National Queer Arts Festival
San Francisco, CA

New Music Bay Area
Oakland, CA

Stephen O’Malley
Paris, France

The Paul Dresher Ensemble [aka Musical Traditions, Inc.]
San Francisco, CA

The Theatre Project
Baltimore, MD

Thingamajigs
Oakland, CA

Young People’s Chorus of New York City
New York, NY

Muhal Richard Abrams
New York, NY

John Luther Adams
New York, NY

Kyle Walker Akins
Reno, NV

Karim Al-Zand
Houston, TX

American Composers Forum
St. Paul, MN

Timo Andres
Brooklyn, NY

Anna and Elizabeth
Baltimore, MD

Matthew Antaky
San Francisco, CA

Archive of Documentary Arts, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
Duke University
Durham, NC

Clarice Assad
New York, NY

Harrison Bankhead
Chicagoland, IL

Eric Banks
Seattle, WA

Rusty Banks
Lancaster, PA

Michael Barrett
New York, NY

Juantio Becenti
Aneth, UT

Judith Berkson
Brooklyn, NY

John Berndt
Baltimore, MD

Ranjit Bhatnagar
Brooklyn, NY

Bias Studios
Springfield, VA

Daniel Blomquist
San Francisco, CA

William Bolcom
Ann Arbor, MI

Joshua Bornfield
Baltimore, MD

Boston Guitarfest
Boston, MA

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Malden, MA

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Boston, MA

Julie Bour
New York, NY

Brentano String Quartet
New York, NY

Deborah Brevoort
North Bergen, NJ

Mark Broschinsky

Laura Brown
Moab, UT

Chris Brubeck
Los Angeles, CA

David Bruce
San Diego, CA

Rick Burkhardt
Brooklyn, NY

Frank Byrne
Kansas City, MO

Joan Caldwell
Corvallis, OR

Canyon Records
Phoenix, AZ

Elizabeth Carena
New York, NY

Erik Carlson
New York, NY

Catalyst Quartet
New York, NY

Orlando Cela
Beijing, China

Phyllis Chen
Astoria, NY

Yi Chen
Kansas City, MO

Cherry Valley Artworks
Cherry Valley, NY

Kyong Mee Choi
Chicago, IL

Mary Chun
San Francisco, CA

Nels Cline
Los Angeles, CA

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Ravi Coltrane
Brooklyn, NY

Composers, Inc.
Berkeley, CA

Conspirare
Austin, TX

Contemporary Portland Orchestra Project
Portland, OR

Jacob Cooper
Brooklyn, NY

Linda Corbitt
Riverside, CA

Shawn Crouch
Miami, FL

Paquito D’ Rivera
North Bergen, NJ

Anthony Davis
San Diego, CA

Lisa Delan

Donnacha Dennehy
Princeton, NJ

Phil Denslow
Lilburn, GA

Jay Derderian
Portland, OR

Zosha Di Castri
New York, NY

Mark Doten
New York, NY

Mark Dresser
San Diego, CA

Tucker Dulin
Brooklyn, NY

David Eisenband
Eugene, OR

Ekmeles
New York, NY

EMPAC – The Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY and New York, NY

ensemble proton
Bern, CH

Mitch Epstein
New York, NY

Robin Estrada
Berkeley, CA

ETHEL’s Foundation for the Arts
New York, NY

Ray Evanoff
New Orleans, LA

Morgan Evans-Weiler
Boston, MA

Luosha Fang
Philadelphia, PA

Fargo-Moorhead Opera
Fargo, ND

Suzanne Farrin
New York, NY

Scott Faulkner
Reno, NV

Jim Findlay
Brooklyn, NY

Simon Fink
St. Joseph, MO

First Look Sonoma
Sebastopol, CA

Daniel Fish
New York, NY

Fort Worth Opera
Fort Worth, TX

Forum Neue Musik Luzern
Emmen, Switzerland

Erik Friedlander
New York, NY

Robbie Fulks
Chicago, IL

Marco Fusi
Milano, IT

Diana Gannett
Ann Arbor, MI

Stacy Garrop
Chicago, IL

Robbie Gjersoe
Chicago, IL

Monroe Golden
Pell City, AL

Malcolm Goldstein
Sheffield, VT

Philip Gotanda
Berkeley, CA

Grand Canyon Music Festival
Grand Canyon, AZ

Larry Gray
Chicago, IL

Jessica Grindstaff
New York, NY

Group Delphi/Justin Hersh
Almeda, CA

Moon Young Ha
New York, NY

Sean Hagerty
New York, NY

Harkness Dance Center
New York, NY

Harvestworks
New York, NY

Imamyar Hasanov
San Francisco, CA

Ted Hearne
Los Angeles, CA

Jake Heggie
San Francisco, CA

Mark Helias
New York, NY

Jennifer Higdon
Philadelphia, PA

Ben Hjertmann
Chicago, IL

Holy Sheboygan!
Fox Valley, WI

Eric Honour
Kansas City, MO

Robert Honstein
Boston, MA

Bart Hopkin
Point Reyes Station, CA

Holland Hopson
Tuscaloosa, AL

Adam Hougland
Bristol, Great Britain

Houston Cinema Arts Society
Houston, TX

Bella Hristova
New York, NY

Ruo Huang
New York, NY

Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art
Peekskill, NY

Craig Hultgren
Birmingham, AL

Jeffery Kyle Hutchins
Minneapolis, MN

Davide Ianni
Boston, MA

IN/S
San Francisco/Oakland, CA

Kamran Ince
Memphis, TN

innova Recordings
St. Paul, MN

Mara Isaacs
Princeton, NJ

Vijay Iyer
New York, NY

Jacob Burns Film Center
Pleasantville, NY

David A. Jaffe
Berkeley, CA

Noah Jenkins
Eugene, OR

John Cage Trust
Red Hook, NY

Chuck Johnson
Oakland, CA

Kari Johnson
Overland Park, KS

Timothy Ernest Johnson
Chicago, IL

Ben Johnston
Madison, WI

Juan Camilo Hernández Sánchez
Paris, France

Jonathan Howard Katz
Brooklyn, NY

Zoe Keating
San Francisco, CA

Kevin Keller
New York, NY

William Kennedy
Albany, CA

Jonathan Khuner
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Kim
Philadelphia, PA

Joshua Kohl
Seattle, WA

Jo Kondo
Tokyo, Japan

Mary Montgomery
Koppel, MA

Tom Kraines
Philadelphia, PA

Morgan Krauss
Chicago, IL

Jay Kreimer
Lincoln, NE

Andrew Kype

Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

Andrew Lafkas
New York, NY

David Lang
New York, NY

Orlando le Fleming
Brooklyn, NY

Cheryl Leonard
San Francisco, CA

Shaw Pong Liu
Boston, MA

Thomas Lloyd
Philadelphia, PA

Benjamin Loeb
El Paso, TX

Quincy Long
New York, NY

Michael Lowenstern
Brooklyn, NY

Phil Lowery
Oakland, CA

Alvin Lucier
Middletown, CT

David Ludwig
Philadelphia, PA

Lyndhurst
Tarrytown, NY

Evan Mack
Saratoga Springs, NY

MAK Center for Art and Architecture, L.A., at the Schindler House
West Hollywood, CA

Philip Mantione
Riverside, CA

Ruotao Mao
Ewing, NJ

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA)
North Adams, MA

Joshua McGuire

John Medeski
New York, NY

Marc Mellits
Chicago, IL

Mendelssohn Club Chorus
Philadelphia, PA

Metropolis Ensemble
Jackson Heights, NY

Milford Public Schools
Milford, CT

Katarina Miljkovic
Boston, MA

David Alan Miller
Albany, NY

Roscoe Mitchell
Chicago, IL

Mode Records
New York, NY

Eric Moe
Pittsburgh, PA

Montalvo Arts Center
Saratoga, CA

Stephan Moore
Pawtucket, RI

Jordan Morley
Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Quintron
New Orleans, LA

John Muehleisen
Seattle, WA

Jeff Myers
New York, NY

NakedEye Ensemble
Lancaster, PA

Joe Nankin
Oakland, CA

Neighborhood Music School
New Haven, CT

Neuberger Museum of Art
Purchase, NY

New Albion Records, Inc.
Tivoli, NY

New Asia Chamber Music Society
New York, NY

New Haven Public Schools
New Haven, CT

New World Records
Brooklyn, NY

Haruko Nishimura
Seattle, WA

Vince Norman
Middletown, MD

NOW Ensemble
New York, NY

Pauline Oliveros
Kingston, NY

Kyle Olson
Brooklyn, NY

Scott Ordway
Dresden, ME

Steven Osgood
Ossining, NY

Jim Santi Owen
San Francisco, CA

Pacific Chorale
Santa Ana, CA

Nicole Paiement
San Francisco, CA

Joan Arnau Pàmies
Chicago, IL

William Parker
New York, NY

Zeena Parkins
Oakland, CA

Robert Patterson
Memphis, TN

Performing Arts of Northeast Connecticut
Pomfret, CT

Jack Perla
San Francisco, CA

Erik Peterson
Denver, CO

Petroglyph Music
Norway

Jonathan Pfeffer
Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia Singers
Philadelphia, PA

Sam Pluta
New York, NY

Chris Potter
New York, NY

William Price
Birmingham, AL

Jeff Ray
Oakland, CA

Zach Redler
Brooklyn, NY

Jacqueline Reid
Rutgers, NJ

Gyan Riley
Brooklyn, NY

Gillian Rivers
New York, NY

Jason Roebke
Chicago, IL

Laurie Rogers
Philadelphia, PA

Katharina Rosenberger
San Diego, CA

Mark Roxey
Lambertville, NJ

David Samas
San Francisco, CA

Lanier Sammons
Santa Cruz, CA

Erik Sanko
New York, NY

Michael Santoro
Taipei, Taiwan

Everett Saunders
Harlem, NY

Jenny Scheinman
Petrolia, CA

M.C. Schmidt
Baltimore, MD

Daniel Schnyder
New York, NY

Sabrina Schroeder
Somerville, MA

Gunther Schuller
Boston, MA

Eric Segnitz
Milwaukee, WI

Amy Seiwert
San Francisco, CA

Peter Serkin
MA

Joshua Shank
Austin, TX

Eleanor Shapiro
Berkeley, CA

Craig Shepard
Brooklyn, NY

Silo Kirkland Farm
Springtown, PA

Isaiah Singer
Brooklyn, NY

Sirius Quartet
New York, NY

Sleeping Giant
Brooklyn, NY

Jessie Marion Smith
Seattle, WA

Nancy Stark
Smith, MA

Sarah Kirkland Snider
Princeton, NJ

Steven Snowden
Austin, TX

So Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Emilio Solla
Brooklyn, NY

Janera Solomon
Pittsburgh, PA

Patrick Soluri
New York, NY

Gregory Spears
Brooklyn, NY

Ron Stabinsky
Wilkes-Barre, PA

Alisha Stauss
Pittsfield, MA

Claudia Stevens
Williamsburg, VA

Andrew Stiefel
Eugene, OR

Howard Stokar
New York, NY

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
Pocantico Hills, NY

Nathaniel Stookey
San Francisco, CA

Lois Svard
Lewisburg, PA

Swoon
New York, NY

Finn Taylor
Berkeley, CA

Clark Tenakhongva
Hoat’Ve’La, AZ

The Industry
Los Angeles, CA

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Augusta Read Thomas
Chicago, IL

Henry Threadgill
New York, NY

Brenda Tom
San Francisco, CA

Trimpin
Seattle, WA

George Tsontakis
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Curtis Tucker
Saratoga, NY

Sierra Urich
Bristol, VT

Mike Vargas
Florence, MA

Octavio Vazquez
New York, NY

Roland Vazquez
Red Hook, NY

Luca Veggetti
Italy

Ilan Volkov
Iceland

Michael Volpe
Nutley, NJ

Vox Femina
Los Angeles, CA

Jeff “Tain” Watts
Easton, PA

Wende Museum
Culver City, CA

Mark Winges
San Francisco, CA

Wisconsin Alliance for Composers
Madison, WI

Woodstock Chimes Fund
Shokan, NY

Charles Wuorinen
New York, NY

Yale School of Music: Music In Schools Initiative
New Haven, CT

Byron Au Yong
Seattle, WA

Jeffrey Young
Brooklyn, NY

Jeffrey Zeigler
Brooklyn, NY

Long Zhou
Kansas City, MO

Cary New Music Performance Fund Recipients

Alarm Will Sound

American Contemporary

Music Ensemble

American Lyric Theater

American Modern Ensemble

American Opera Projects

Argento New Music Project

Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, New York City Chapter, Inc.

C4: The Choral Composers/Conductors Collective

Da Capo Chamber Players

Dither

Ear Heart Music

Either/Or

Ekmeles

ETHEL

Harvestworks

ISSUE Project Room

League of Composers/ISCM

Look and Listen Festival

Mantra Percussion

Metropolis Ensemble

MIVOS Quartet

Momenta Quartet

Music at the Anthology (MATA)

Music From China

Music Mondays

New Amsterdam Presents

New Thread Quartet

Newspeak

PRISM Quartet

Qubit New Music

Quintet of the Americas

S.E.M. Ensemble

So Percussion

Talea Ensemble

Talujon

The Firehouse Space

The Jazz Gallery

TRANSIT

VisionIntoArt Presents

Wet Ink

Yarn/Wire

PANELISTS

Kati Agócs
Boston, MA

César Alvarez
Yonkers, NY

Cristian Amigo
New York, NY

Byron Au Yong
Seattle, WA

Renee’ Baker
Chicago, IL

Myra Bazell
Philadelphia, PA

Cindy Bernard
Los Angeles, CA

Edward Bilous
New York, NY

Dan Blake
Brooklyn, NY

Michael Boriskin
Bedford Hills, NY

Kitty Brazelton
New York, NY

Kirsten Broberg
Minneapolis, MN

Margaret Brouwer
Cleveland, OH

Chris Cerrone
New York, NY

Evan Chambers
Ann Arbor, MI

Dorothy Chang
British Columbia, Canada

Yu-Hui Chang
Boston, MA

Eric Chasalow
Boston, MA

Shih-Hui Chen
Houston, TX

Anthony Cheung
Chicago, IL

Michael Ching
Ames, IA

Eric KM Clark
Los Angeles, CA

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Tracey Cockrell
Portland, OR

Chris Cogburn
Austin, TX

Viv Corringham
Minneapolis, MI

Robin Cox
Los Angeles, CA

David Crumb
Eugene, OR

Conrad Cummings
New York, NY

Amy Denio
Seattle, WA

Jay Derderian
Portland, OR

Robert Dick
New York, NY

Avner Dorman
Gettysburg, PA

Hamid Drake
Evanston, IL

Elena Dubinets
Seattle, WA

David Dzubay
Bloomington, IN

Monica Ellis
New York, NY

Jan Faidley
Kansas City, MO

Joshua Fineberg
Charlestown, MA

EvanFlory-Barnes
Seattle, WA

Dan Froot
Los Angeles, CA

Erin Gee
Champaign, IL

Doug Geers
New York, NY

Christine Goodman
Jersey City, NJ

Wycliffe Gordon
New York, NY

Dan Grabois
Madison, WI

Pat Graney
Seattle, WA

Sean Griffin
Los Angeles, CA

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Daron Hagen
New York, NY

Conor Hanick
New York, NY

Barbara Heroux
San Francisco, CA

Julia Holter
Los Angeles, NY

Susie Ibarra
Kerhonkson, NY

Mark Izu
Bay Area, CA

John Jasperse
New York, NY

Margaret Jenkins
San Francisco, CA

Jeri LynneJohnson
Philadelphia, PA

Marcia Kamper
Baltimore, MD

Lisa Kaplan
Chicago, IL

John Kennedy
Berkeley, CA

Marianne Kim
Phoenix, AZ

Amy Knoles
Los Angeles, CA

Joanna Kotze
New York, NY

Joann Kulesza
Baltimore, MD

Kristin Kuster
Ann Arbor, MI

Charlton Lee
San Francisco, CA

Gabriela Lena Frank
Berkeley, CA

Lei Liang
San Diego, CA

Jenny Lin
New York, NY

Lisa Lipton
Portland, OR

Zhou Long
Kansas City, KS

Sarah Lutman
St. Paul, MN

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

Carol McGonnell
New York, NY

Paula Mlyn
New York, NY

James Mobberley
Liberty, MO

Clint Needham
Cleveland Heights, OH

KT Nelson
San Francisco, CA

Miles Okazaki
New York, NY

Madeleine Oldham
Berkeley, CA

Moto Osada
New York, NY

Lothar Osterburg
Brooklyn, NY

Tim Page
Los Angeles, CA

Tae Hong Park
New York, NY

Tomeka Reid
Chicago, IL

Matana Roberts
New York, NY

Harold Rosenbaum
New York, NY

Mathew Rosenblum
Pittsburgh, PA

Daniel Bernard Roumain
New York, NY

Chris Rountree
Los Angeles, CA

Hahn Rowe
New York, NY

Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez
Rochester, NY

Molly Shanahan
Philadelphia, PA

Kevin Stalheim
Milwaukee, WI

Rand Steiger
San Diego, CA

Christopher Tignor
New York, NY

Liuh-Wen Ting
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Vincent
Boston, MA

Ines Voglar
Portland, OR

Lawson White
New York, NY

Meg Wolfe
Los Angeles, CA

Scott Wollschleger
Brooklyn, NY

Francis Wong
San Francisco, CA

Randy Woolf
New York, NY

Jay Alan Yim
Evanston, IL

Julie Yoon
New York, NY

NEWMUSICBOX ARTICLES 2013–2014

When Sunny Gets Blue—Remembering Harold Shapero (1920-2013)

Stacy Garrop: With a Story to Tell

Sounds Heard: Luke Cissell—Cosmography

The Mush Race of Boston: The SICPP 2013 Iditarod

April 2013 Composer Assistance Program Awardees Announced

What Do You Sound Like, and Where Are You Going?–Thoughts from the 2013 June in Buffalo Festival

Austin Summer Festivals: Business as Unusual

Back on the Road

Winners and Losers

Harbison Receives BSO’s Horblit Award

On the Road with Mischa Zupko

Sounds Heard: Christine Southworth—String Quartets

Wearing Two Hats: Stewart Copeland on Playing and Composing

Derivative Works

Manufactured Innocence

Acknowledging the Rhino: Talking Art In a Capitalist World

End of the Road

Words of Encouragement

Submission, Discomfort, and Transcendence

Mark Adamo’s The Gospel of Mary Magdalene

Sounds Heard: Rzewski, Tenney, Parkins—Music for String Quartet and Percussion

Paula Matthusen: Attention to Light

New England’s Prospect: Babylon Revisited

Five Lessons American Musicians Can Learn From Guildhall’s Music Leadership Program

Cable Comparisons

Back in the Apple

Join The Chorus

Sounds Heard: Daniel Wohl—Corps Exquis

Newly Launched Composer Subscription Service Offers Alternative Publishing Model

Shape Notes, Billings, and American Modernisms

New England’s Prospect: Arlene Sierra at Yellow Barn

Austin Chamber Music Center Summer Festival: Victoire and Pride

A Hot Time in the Old Town

Big Picture

Laterna Magica

I’m a Trans Composer. What the Hell Does That Mean?

Wanted: Local Bay Area Musicians

A Wholly Factual Account of a Failed Attempt to Transcend Gender Through Electroacoustic Musical Theatre

Sounds Heard: Jacqueline Humbert and David Rosenboom—Daytime Viewing

Carman Moore: Curiosity Is the Strongest Engine

Up Against the Ceiling

It’s Not Carved in Stone

No Place Like This—The 2013 Mizzou International Composers’ Festival

New England’s Prospect: All-Lou Harrison Concert At Monadnock Music

Sounds Heard: Brooklyn Rider—A Walking Fire

The Second Performance and Beyond

In the Bay Area: Cahill at the Piano and Music@Menlo

Forest for the Trees

Delay Is Denial

The Numbers Game

Sounds Heard: Rebekah Heller—100 names

Listening to the Unknown

Caleb Burhans: Inner Voices

Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival: A Sandbox of Sounds

A Category of Our Own

Copy Rites

It’s Always Now

Grant Enables Major Expansion of American Lyric Theater’s Composer Librettist Development Program

New England’s Prospect: The Manicured Lawns (Tanglewood’s Festival of Contemporary Music)

Sounds Heard: In the Mood for a Melody (Piano Person Edition)

New Music USA Announces More Than $1.2M in New Grants

Your 2013-14 Attitude Guide: Four to Cop, Four to Drop for an Amazing Season

Music is Music: The 2013 PARMA Music Festival

Turn Out the Stars

Composing and Responsibility

Wellesley Composers Conference and Chamber Music Center

NewMusicBox Mix: The Jazz Edition

Judged By Its Cover

On Repetition

Preparing for Takeoff

Narong Prangcharoen Wins $15K 2013 Barlow Prize

Lest We Forget

Friends

Derek Bermel: Context is Key

Sound Heard: Mark Gustavson— Dissolving Images

Two Strains

The Smithsonian Institute Blues

Solidarity Revisited

For Even the “Most Stupid Persons”

Sounds Heard: The Disquiet

Junto Food Opera: Merging Taste and Sound in Real Time

Stockhausen and Terror

The Travis Weller Instrumentarium

9/11 – Jazz

Never the Same Twice

Sounds Heard: Blowing In The Wind (Flute Edition)

Iron Composer 2013

Kenneth Kirschner: Pirate This Music

Space Age Synths

Perceptions of Success

Thoughts of Mainstream

Inviting Possibilities for New Music and Music Education

How We Learn Now: Education Week

Andrew Norman Joins Opera Philadelphia as Third Composer in Residence

Notes From the Other Side of the Desk

Sounds Heard (Historical Edition): Henry Brant—Young People’s Records

Vijay Iyer and Jeremy Denk Among 2013 MacArthur Fellows

Music, MOOCs, and Copyright: Digital Dilemmas for Schools of Music

Unteaching

Speaking of Which: Musical Expression in a Foreign Language

Reflections on Liberal Arts and Late Bloomers

Austin Soundwaves: A Challenge Like Nothing Else

On Lying To My Students

Hail to Thee, and Sing Out!

Jazz in Education

The World Beyond the Classroom: SFCM Nurtures Community Creativity and Optimism

Standards and Creativity

Learn How To Learn How To Learn: On Being a Self- Taught and a Non-Self-Taught Composer

Kernis Resigns from Minnesota Orchestra

Morton Subotnick: The Mad Scientist in the Laboratory of the Ecstatic Moment

The Medium

Controlling the Catalogue

Culture Counter Culture

It Isn’t Over Because “the Fat Lady Wasn’t Singing”

Diligence is to Magic as Progress is to Flight

Sounds Heard: Noah Creshevsky—The Four Seasons

New Music USA’s Project Grants Are Now Open

Copland House Announces 2013 Residency Awards

You Used to Like Terrible Music

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 2
Can We Move Past Post-Race, Already?

Ostrava 2013

Sounds Heard: Erik Friedlander—Claws and Wings

After Einstein

Morton Subotnick’s Sidewinder

From the Shed to the Stars: Reflections on the Boston University Tanglewood Institute

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 3

Wonder and Magic

Music is the Gateway Drug to Listening

Sounds Heard: Make It Big (Large Ensemble Edition)

Van-Anh Vanessa Vo: Old Sounds / New Music

Double Trio: line upon line and Konk Pack

Revise THIS!

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 4

Competitive Nature

Making It Matter

Gloriously Messy Lodging:Zappa’s 200 Motels

Sounds Heard: Florestan Recital Project—Early Songs of Samuel Barber

Alone At The Top: What Conductor Susanna Malkki’s Success Means—and What It Doesn’t

Stayin’ Alive: Preserving Electroacoustic Music Culture

Laura Kaminsky: Every Place Has a Story

Creative Partners in the Work of Life

Every Place is a Musical Capital

SoundSpace: Graphic Notation

Sounds Heard: Taylor Ho Bynum—Navigation

#Yeezus: Lessons in Contemporary Performance from the Stadium Set

Lou Reed Got Married and He Didn’t Invite Me

Cage’s (More Than) Ten Thousand Things

Finally, Movement on the Notation Front

Culture Counter Culture Pt. 5

Guided By Sound: Crissy Broadcast Debuts in San Francisco

New England’s Prospect: Celebrating Ned Rorem @90 in Boston

Sounds Heard: Alvin Lucier—Orchestra Works

Jamie Baum: Jazz Diplomacy

In Memoriam: Arnold Rosner (1945-2013)

Mixed Media: Collaborative Music and Visual Art Making for Ten x Ten: 2013

Cultured?

A Chance to %@#$! Around

New England’s Prospect: Anniversary Waltzes—Kronos @ 40 in Providence

Fear of Simplicity

Audience Cultivation In American New Music

It Takes a Village: Daron Hagen’s A Woman in Morocco

Cultured, Part 2

A View Behind the Curtain

New England’s Prospect: The Second Hand Unwinds—A 45th Season for Boston Musica Viva

Sounds Heard: Computer-Assisted

From Darmstadt to the Shopping Mall

Other Guitars

Invisible Cities: Choose Your Own Opera

University of Louisville Announces 2014 $100K Grawemeyer Music Prize

Dan Trueman: Man Out of Time

In and Out of Jetlag

Sounds Heard: Spektral Quartet—Chambers

100 Guitars Rock West Coast Premiere of Rhys Chatham’s A Secret Rose Music for Angelenos, by
Angelenos

If Elton John Sings But Everyone Else Does Too, Does It Make a Sound?

Culture, The End.

Common Ground

Some Additional 2014 Grammy Nominations

Fair and Balanced

Sounds Heard: Alvin Lucier—Still and Moving Lines

Digital Audio Workstations: Notation and Engagement Reconsidered

Competition Fees: How Much is Too Much?

A Point of Culture

2013 ASCAP Foundation Awards Announced

To Jury or Not to Jury

All Venues Great and Small

Rhythm and Restlessness

Remembering Jim Hall (1930-2013)

NewMusicBox Mix: 2013 Staff Picks

Sweeter Music and High Art

New Music Boxes: Another Year’s Gone By

Carolyn O’Brien: Making Music as Tactile as Possible

Paul Rudy: Life Improvisations

Happy Holidays

Out of Network

Jingle Those Bells

New England’s Prospect: May All Your Christmases Be Weird

Lisa Bielawa: Fire Starter

A Drone Too Long

The Audience is the Most Important Instrument

Three Words for 2014: Chicago Musicians Reflect and Aspire in the New Year

Noise Reduction

The Mutual Benefit Balance

Sounds Heard: Zevious—Passing Through the Wall

The Entertainer

What Counts as Borrowed Material?

Evolving the Old, Inviting the New

Making New (New) Music

Henri Lazarof (1932-2013), Who Dominated My Life for Six Years

Sounds Heard: Some American Albums

Eric Nathan: Making It as Clear as Possible

Always Something New—Remembering Yusef Lateef(1920-2013)

How To Be Culturally Relevant

Creative Thinking Biases

An Expanding Paradigm

Sounds Heard: Ingram Marshall and Jim Bengston—Alcatraz and Eberbach

The Shame Of Poverty And Investing In The Future

Finalists in 2014 American Composers Forum National Composition Contest Announced

The Appropriation Problem

Finding the Right Balance

New England’s Prospect: Fellow Travelers “Sometimes” Music

New England’s Prospect: Three World Premieres in Wildly Disparate Styles

Sounds Heard: Duo Scordatura, The Act of Loving You, and Ritual

A Master Communicator: Remembering H. Owen Reed (1910-2014)

History Of The World

What Would Grammys Look Like in a Genre-Less World?

Andrew Norman: Empowering Performance

Soul of the Nation

Aperio: Indie-A-Go-Go

Sounds Heard: Chris Wild–Abhanden

Framing Your Voice, Part 1

Send Chutes and Ladders

Citizenship

Steve Reich Wins 400K Euro BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award

Sounds Heard: Keeril Makan–Afterglow

Fair Trade for Sheet Music

Framing Your Voice, Part 2

Big Data Only Gets You So Far, or Why Social Science Is Really Hard

Very Modern Love Songs: Your Weird, Steamy Playlist for V-Day

Art in the Age: Going for (more than) a Song

New England’s Prospect: Boston Symphony Chamber Players Celebrate 50 Years

Sounds Heard: Big Robot

Kamala Sankaram: Being One with the Performance

Rethinking How We Teach Composition, Part 1

Putting Artists in the Limelight

Great Expectations: The Composer’s Progress

Sounds Heard: Things You Already Know

Keep Dallas Wired: The Dallas Opera Plugs Into Death and the Powers

You’re Doing Targeted Marketing Wrong

Rethinking How We Teach Composition, Part 2

Music for Difficult Days

Marc Neikrug: An Outlet for Emotional Experience

New England’s Prospect: The Agnosticism of Boston’s Equilibrium Concert Series

Three Strikes Against Success

Sixteen Composers Receive AAAL Awards Totaling $175,000

Sounds Heard: Janice Misurell-Mitchell—Vanishing Points

Skirts or Pants? How About Both

Towards a More Visceral Living

Challenging Tradition: Why Classical Musicians Should Learn Folk Music

Esa-Pekka Salonen Wins $100,000 2014 Nemmers Composition Prize

Unsung Heroes

Sounds Heard:The Quiet Ones

Is Contemporary Music Ready for a Baby Boom?

Tilting the Frame: Notes on an Alternative Education

Inspired Collaboration: No Idea Festival 2014

Broken Notions of Why Art Matters

Remembering Robert Ashley (1930-2014)

Marin Alsop, Frances Richard and Steven Schick to Receive ACF Champion of New Music Awards

Vicki Ray Reflects on 20 Years of Piano Spheres But Can She Play?

Sounds Heard: Zwerm—Underwater Princess Waltz

Joel Puckett: Real Life Inspiration

On the Purpose of Art in 700 Words or Less

Getting Out of the Box

David Lang and Alvin Singleton to be Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters

SXNY – The Big Apple heads to Austin

1, 2, 3… Action

Sounds Heard: These Just Out

Jazz Audience Development: The Gender Factor

Goofing off, Perfected: Lessons from Fluxus

Phill Niblock and Elodie Lauten Receive Top FCA Awards

New England’s Prospect: The Gift of Sound and Vision

2014 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards Announced

Juan Orrego-Salas: I’ve Written All I Have to Write

Sarah Kirkland Snider Awarded DSO’s 7th Annual Elaine Lebenbom Memorial Award for Female Composers

OPERA America Awards $100K to 8 Female Opera Composers

Brooklyn in Austin’s House

Buddhist music-making: how meditation could transform the way you work

Cataloging the Fail: A Cathartic Scrapbook

Let’s Get Critical

Ted Hearne Named Third Annual New Voices Composer

Matana Roberts Named Among 2014 Herb Alpert Award Winners

New Music’s Quality Problem

Sounds Heard: Douglas Detrick—The Bright and Rushing World

New England’s Prospect: Beyond the Sea

Austin: Conspirare’s Moving Light

The Artist’s Dictionary: Redefining Success

When Life Throws You Cincinnati, Redefine Chili

Composers, Meet Identity-Protective Cognition

John Luther Adams Wins 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Music

Rome Prize Winners Announced

All the Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho (1957-2014)

Guggenheim Fellowship Awards in the US and Canada Announced

New Music is Academic Music

Sounds Heard: Adventures Far and Wide

Boston: Practice Sessions

Aaron Parks: Make Me Believe a Melody

LA: A Spring 2014 Concertgoer’s Journal, Part 1

Chicago: Relearning to Listen–New Piano Music for Children

So You Want To Write An Opera….

Austin: Fast Fo(u)rward

Performing Quality

Doris Duke Artist and First-Ever Impact Awards Announced

Sounds Heard: 17 More Takes on those 88 Keys

Lapsed Composer and Curmudgeonly Critic Reveals All About the Reviewing Racket!

13 Emerging Composers Selected for June 2014 Readings and Performances by NY Philharmonic and American
Composers Orchestra

So You Want To Start An Opera Company…
Austin: Mozart Requiem–Undead Defining Musical Quality

Sounds Heard: Thomas DeLio—Selected Compositions (1991-2013)

Chicago: For Practically Everyone—New Label Finds Our Musical Soft Spots

NewMusicBox @ 15: Reflections on Change, Challenge, and Music in the 21st Century

Dave Malloy: Singing for His Soul (Not His Supper)

Partyin’ Like It’s 1999

Music and Place

The 2000 Man—What Century Was This Anyway?

Games Played: FRACT OSC

The Odyssey of 2001

Leo Kraft (1922-2014): Spiky, Tart, and Fierce but also Sweet and Gentle

Trying to Put On Those 2002 Glasses

Trite and True

Peter Sellars and Chuck Berry Win 2014 Polar Prize

2003: Difficult Memories

Viewing Party: An Artist Profile Highlight Reel

2004: Keys to the Kingdom

Music and The Body

2005: The Friends and Family Plan

Sounds Heard: Meredith Monk—Piano Songs

2006: Walk Right In, Sit Right Down

2007: Big Ideas In a 140-Character World

Should I Start a New Music Ensemble?

2008: NewMusicBox Snapshots—Nine Images for Nine Years

You Don’t Say! Quotable Quotes from NewMusicBox

David T. Little Named 4th Composer in Residence at Opera Philadelphia

2009: Just Add A Dollop Of Salsa

Music and The Heart

2014 BMI Student Composer Awards Announced

2010: Favorite Things And Inspirations

Twelve Tidbits from 2011

2012: A Baker’s Dozen

Boston: Caroline Shaw’s Common Cause

The Class of 2013

20 Composers Honored at American Academy Ceremonial

Performers as Co-Creators

2014: Remembering The Year That Isn’t Over Yet

2014 ASCAP Concert Music Awards

Houston: River Oaks Chamber Orchestra

Sounds Heard: Jefferson Friedman and Craig Wedren—On In Love

Music and The Number Four

Profiling the Jazz Police

What’s In a Festival?

NY Phil Biennial Pre-Game

Making the Numbers Work

Chicago: The ancient futuremusic of Sam Scranton

Miya Masaoka: Social and Sonic Relationships

Pavillons en l’air—Bell’s Up on the NYPhil Biennial

Classical Music in the Era of ESPN

Sounds Heard: Azure Carter and Alan Sondheim—Avatar Woman

Composing on the Pacific Crest Trail

27 Orchestras Honored with 2013-14 ASCAP Awards For Adventurous Programming

San Antonio: SOLI chamber ensemble—20 years of new music

January: Wyoming and the Open

2014 Paul Revere Awards Announced at Music Publishers Association Annual Meeting

NY Phil Biennial: Scads, Oodles, and Heaps of Composers

Get ‘Em While They’re Young: New Music as a Gateway to Classical Music

Sounds Heard: Andy Biskin Ibid—Act Necessary

ASCAP Honors 5 Jazz Legends and 36 Emerging Talents

Kevin Puts Appointed Director of Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute

Elodie Lauten (1950-2014): Channeling Cosmic Forces

Let’s Get American About Our Music

February: New Mexico and the Holes

Ciao Manhattan: A Remembrance of Lee Hyla (1952-2014)

On the Good and the Great—Wrapping up the NY Phil Biennial

Boston: Bromp Treb Busts the Matrix

Lessons from the Central Valley

Metropolitan Opera Cancels Death of Klinghoffer Live HD Transmission

Sounds Heard: Akropolis Reed Quintet—Unraveled

Readers Respond to Death of Klinghoffer Simulcast Cancellation

Jim (J.K.) Randall (1929-2014)—Out of View of Anything Resembling the Mainstream

Bora Yoon: The Weight of Magic

March: Virginia and the Dancers

Listening to the Journey:Hypersensitive Hearing on the Trail

Nerd Composer

Sounds Heard: Robert Erickson Complete String Quartets

Chicago: The deafening silence of the Beethoven Festival musicians

The Score Has Got You By the Short Hairs

NEA Names 2014 National Heritage Fellowships and 2015 Jazz Masters

Boston: SICPP’s Love and Geometry

April: Texas, New York, and the Oppositions

Pew Announces 2014 Grants for Philadelphia Artists and Organizations

D.J. Spooky Wins National Geographic Society Emerging Explorer Award

Memories of Horace Silver (1928-2014)

The Roar of the Crowd: Freelance Musicians Speak Out on Non-Payment

WRITERS

Armando Bayolo
Emily Bookwalter
Jordan Borg
David Brensilver
Sidney Chen
Kevin Clark
Collaborators of Robert Ashley
Andy Costello
Grant Chu Covell
Kealy Cozens
Rob Deemer
Andy Doe
Nat Evans
Daniel Felsenfeld
David First
Kenneth D. Froelich
Alexandra Gardner
Aaron Gervais
Mara Gibson
Bob Gluck
Jennie Gottschalk
Kurt Gottschalk
Matthew Guerrieri
Luke Gullickson
Joseph Hallman
Kenneth Hamrick
Ratzo B. Harris
Zach Herchen
Monika Herzig
Caio Higginson
Sam Hillmer
Eugene Holley, Jr.
Colin Holter
Ben Houge
Marie Incontrera
Willard Jenkins
Jennifer Jolley
Ethan Joseph
Chris Kallmyer
Zoe Kemmerling
Aaron Jay Kernis
Daniel Kessner
Daniel J. Kushner
Kristin Kuster
Steven Mackey
John McNeil
Ellen McSweeney
Dom Minasi
Clint Needham
Osnat Netzer
Frank J. Oteri
Marek Poliks
Will Robin
Mathew Rosenblum
Adam Rudolph
Charles Ruggiero
Mischa Salkind-Pearl
Isaac Schankler
Sean Shepherd
Molly Sheridan
Daniel Siepmann
Andrew Sigler
Walter Simmons
Greg Simon
Sara Sitzer
Adam Sliwinski
Edward Smaldone
Alex Temple
Dennis Tobenski
Evan Tobias
Dale Trumbore
Sugar Vendil
Dan Visconti

ENDOWMENT

Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust
The Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Inc.
The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
Baisley Powell Elebash Fund
The Ford Foundation
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The National Endowment for the Arts
The Rockefeller Brothers Fund
The Helen F. Whitaker Fund
Anonymous

INSTITUTIONS

$100,000+

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The Mary Flager Cary Charitable Trust
The New York State Council on the Arts
The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

$50,000-99,999

The Aaron Copland Fund
The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
The National Endowment for the Arts
The Alice M. Ditson Fund

$10,000-$24,999

The Amphion Foundation
The Francis Goelet Trust
The Getty Foundation
The Reed Foundation

$3000-$9,999

ASCAP Corporation
The ASCAP Foundation
The Fan Fox and Leslie Samuels Foundation
The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts

$1500-$2999

BMI Corporation
The BMI Foundation
The Rodgers and Hammerstein Foundation

$1000-$1499

The Harkness Foundation for Dance

COMPOSERS CIRCLE

Leaders ($5,000+)

John Harbison
Steve Stucky

Advocates ($2,000 -$4,999)

John Adams
Dan Godfrey
Augusta Read Thomas
In honor of James Kendrick, Kristin Lancino, Frances Richard, and Steven Stucky

Endorsers ($500-$1,999)

Samuel Adler
Ed Harsh
Jake Heggie
Jennifer Higdon
Lori Laitman
Steve Reich
Elliott Schwartz
Alex Shapiro
Anonymous (2)

Individuals

$10,000+

Alan Kornberg
Frederick Peters
Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

$3000-$9,999

Arts Federation
NancyBell Coe
Marya Martin and
Kenneth Davidson

$1200-$2999

Michael Embler and Maria Cilenti
Dorothea Endicott
David and Harriet Kaufman
Kristin and Thierry Lancino
A. Slade and Phyllis Mills
Linda and Stuart Nelson
Barbara A. Petersen
Frances Richard
Susan Sollins-Brown
Paul Sperry
The Cheswatyr Foundation
Wise Family Charitable Foundation

$600-$1199

Mrs. Helen Coyner
Mr. Anthony Creamer
Leslie Kandell
James Kendrick
Mr. and Mrs. Richard and Karen LeFrak In honor of Ed Yim
Gayle Morgan
Mr. Thomas W. Morris
Steven and Brenda Schick
Mr. Elliott Schwartz
Matias Tarnopolsky
The Selvage Fund
Dr. Carol Zale
Mr. Michel Zaleski In honor of Fred Peters
Anonymous (1)

$300-$599

Mr. Samuel Adler
Dr. Rae Alexander-Minter
Rhoda Baruch In honor of Ethan Joseph
Mr. and Mrs. Astrid and John Baumgardner
Theodore and Joanna Chapin
Ms. Susan Feder and Todd Gordon
Benjamin B. Johnston
Mr. David Alan Miller
Martin and Lucy Miller Murray
Frank Proto
Mr. Gilbert B. Rose
Stephen Sondheim
Ms. Connie Steensma
Anonymous (3)

$120-$299

Dr. Dwight D. Andrews
Ms. Deborah Campana and Mitchell Arnold
Ms. Susan Cheng
Andrew Chiang
Ms. Judith Cody
Joanne Cossa
Noah Creshevsky
Mr. Donald Crockett
Dr. Gabriela Lena Frank
Michael and Nancy Coffin Geller
Ms. Kathy Henkel
Ms. Laura Kaminsky
Ms. Lydia Kontos
Mr. Richard LeSueur
Mr. and Mrs. Barry and Sally Mandel
Mr. Ed Matthew
Mr. Harold Meltzer
Ms. Ursula Oppens
Mr. Marc Ostrow
Mr. Daniel J. Perlongo
Mr. Norman Ryan
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski
Mr. Paul Smadbeck
Ms. Deborah Steinglass
Robert Sutherland
Lawrence Tarlow
Jennifer Wada
Gernot Wolfgang
Zhou Long and Chen Yi
Wes York and Bob Scrofani
Ms. Judith Lang Zaimont
Anonymous (3)

$60-$119

Roger M. Aldridge
Mr. Greg Allen
Mr. Bill Alves
Daniel Asia
Robert and Linda Attiyeh
Mrs. Lilian Barbash
Ms. Carol Barnett
Ms. Eve Beglarian
In honor of Frances Richard
Mr. Philip C. Brunelle
Thomas Buckner
Ms. Gloria Cheng
Wesley Clark In honor of Kevin E.F. Clark
Thomas Cleman
Andrew Cyr
Ms. Mary H. DuPree
Dr. Marti Epstein
Mr. Paul A. Epstein
Mr. Peter Flint
Mitch Gillette
Peter Golub
Dr. Susan E. Haig
Maestro Thomas Hampson
Mr. Bernard Hoffer
Ms. Felicity A. Howlett
Heidi Jacob
Dan Joseph
Bill Kraft
Ms. Jessica A. Krash
Paul Lansky
Ms. Tania Leon
Arthur Levering
Mrs. Nancy B. Loeffler
Ms. Patricia Mancini
Maury Newburger
Dr. Timothy Olsen
Ms. Vivian Perlis
Neva Pilgrim
Michael Robinson
Dr. Robert Xavier Rodriguez
Mr. Peter Rubardt
Mr. Anthony W. Schuman
Mr. Peter W. Shea
Ms. Lucy A. Shelton
Dr. Gloria Wilson Swisher
Stephen Oleskey and
Judith Tick
Libby Van Cleve
and Jack Vees
Frank Wallace
Mr. Dan Welcher
Mr. James H. Willey
Yehudi Wyner
Anonymous (6)

$1-$59

Dr. Elizabeth R. Austin
Dan Becker
William Bolcom
and Joan Morris
Ms. Linda Bouchard
Ms. Kim Braun
Mr. Thomas D. Brosh
Margaret Brouwer
Ryan Brown
Robert B. Carl
Mr. Elliot Cole
Mr. Allan Crossman
Mr. Conrad Cummings
Dr. Michael G. Cunningham
Mr. Doug Davis
In honor of Earl Kim
Mr. Kenneth Deveney
Ms. Jan Faidley
Jim Fox In honor of Cold Blue Music
Aaron Friedman
Mr. Ralph Grierson
Mr. Jonathan Bailey Holland
Mr. Peter Homans
Pierre Jalbert
Mr. Alden Jenks
Ethan Joseph
Mr. Chris Lastovicka
Anne LeBaron
Sharan Leventhal
Robert McCormick
Mr. Lars Michnevich
In honor of Burton A. Johnston
Ms. Janice Misurell-Mitchell
Ms. Martha Mooke
Amanda Moran In honor of Lea Burroughs
Jeffrey Mumford
Dr. Michael Murray
Dr. Robert Nasta
Paula Peace
Alan Ferber and Jody Redhage
Mr. David Rimelis
Ms. Erin Rogers
Ms. Patsy Rogers
Mr. Martin Rokeach
Curtis Rumrill
Mr. Allen Shearer
Dr. Adam Silverman In honor of Frank J. Oteri

Total Revenue :
$2,610,816

Total Expenses :
$2,607,828
(including $1,097,382 in grants to the field)

Endowment value as of 6/30/14:
$17,749,969
(including $12,813,703 restricted to grantmaking)

Officers

Frederick Peters, Chair
Steven Stucky, Vice Chair
Kristin Lancino, Secretary
Joseph Walker, Treasurer
Ed Harsh, President and CEO

Trustees

Rae Alexander-Minter
Theodore Chapin
NancyBell Coe
Dorothea Endicott
Tim Gallagher
Daniel S. Godfrey
Harriet Kaufman
James Kendrick
Alan Kornberg
Marya Martin
Phyllis Mills
Gayle Morgan
Barbara A. Petersen
Frances Richard
Esa-Pekka Salonen
Steven Schick
Matías Tarnopolsky

Artists Council

Harold Meltzer, Chair
Eve Beglarian
Derek Bermel
Chen Yi
Alvin Curran
Gabriela Lena Frank
Laura Karpman
Paul S. Phillips
Robert Xavier Rodriguez
Steve Reich
Julia Wolfe

Media Council

Alex Shapiro, Chair
Deborah Campana
Daphne Carr
John Nasukaluk Clare
Christine Clark
Jean Cook
Jessica Lustig
Doug McLennan
Marvin Rosen
Norman Ryan
Carol Zale

Staff

Chitra Arunasalam
Director of Finance and
Administration

Emily Bookwalter
Grantmaking and Community
Manager

Kevin Clark
Strategic Director for Public
Engagement

Melissa De Bartolomeo
Developer

Eddy Ficklin
Technology Manager and Developer

Alexandra Gardner
Associate Editor and Community
Manager, NewMusicBox

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

Ethan Joseph
Manager for Individual Giving

Frank J. Oteri
Composer Advocate and Senior
Editor, NewMusicBox

Sam Reising
Grantmaking Assistant

Hannah Rubashkin
Manager for Institutional Giving

Deborah Steinglass
Director of Development

Molly Sheridan
Executive Editor, NewMusicBox and
Director, Counterstream Radio

Scott Winship
Director of Grantmaking Programs

The audience at a Dithyrambalina performance
(photo by Tod Seelie)

Invisible Cities
(photo by Dana Ross)

NewMusicBox@15
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Lisa Bielawa
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Invisible Cities
(photo by Dana Ross)

Education Week
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Vijay Iyer
(photo by Jimmy Katz)

Ragamala Dance
(photo by Ed Bock)

Aaron Parks
(photoby Alexandra Gardner)

Ellen McSweeny
(photo by Danielle Aquiline)

Uniting New Music Communities In Oregon
(photo by David Eisenband)

Performance of Jim Crow’s Tears
(photo by Liz Brauer)

Anna Clyne, Jennifer Koh, and
Jamie Laredo with the LA Chamber Orchestra
(photo by Jamie Pham)

Juan Orrego-Salas
(photo courtesy of Juan Orrego-Salas)

Andrew Cyr
(photo courtesy of Metropolis Ensemble)

Theris at a Dithyrambalina performance
(photo by Melissa Stryker)

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