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Dear Friends:

New American music is flourishing. One glance at the artists and work represented in this booklet will make that clear. From projects like Invisible Cities and Song of the Jasmine, to organizations like Roomful of Teeth and the Center for New Music, those in the field recognize this moment as one in which old ideas about “classical” music do not limit the range of adventure and creativity happening now. The music of our time is whatever we want it to be.

Many have paved the way, from Jack Dejohnette to David Lang to Juan Orrego-Salas. But individual artists in isolation can only do so much to foster a culture that appreciates new music. For that reason, a few composers came together in 1939 to form the American Music Center, and later in 1974 a few others formed Meet The Composer. Those artists were acting out of a need to create opportunities not just for themselves, but for all living American composers. Through a broad series of programs over the last 70 years, many of the dreams of those organizations have been realized. And yet, our dreams are so much bigger than the resources at hand.

Simply put, there is far too little funding available for artists and the ensembles and presenters who bring their work to the public. At New Music USA, we are privileged to distribute endowed funds specifically designated to support exciting new music in America. Through New Music USA project grants, we created a simple and streamlined way to request funds for new music projects. In doing so, we opened the doors to applications from a wide range of artists. While we are incredibly proud of the projects that we were able to fund, the process has made us more aware than ever of the great needs of our field. It is a testament to the strength and vitality of this community that artists are able to accomplish so much with so little, but we can and must do more.

As you read through the 2013-2014 Year In Review, you will notice that our activities have a singular focus: to build awareness of, and advocate for, the broad range of new music that is being created across this country. Whether through project page updates, or a NewMusicBox article that gives a local issue national scope, we seek to grow an energetically networked community around new American music. Showing the strength and vibrancy of our community through this network is a powerful way to increase opportunities for all.

Please join us in this community! Create an account on newmusicusa.org, follow a project, create a profile, sign up for our email newsletter, and participate in a conversation on NewMusicBox. Our horizons are only as expansive as we are united.

Enjoy the music!

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

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Dear Friends:

Music needs community. The collective values that give it power grow out of human connections. Our Year in Review’s selection of projects, writings, and activities from New Music USA’s 2014-2015 season illustrates our mission-driven commitment to creating and sustaining a richly diverse network made up not just of practitioners, but of lifelong lovers of new music as well as those with newly blossoming curiosity.

We promote the interactions within that perpetually developing community through NewMusicBox. Profiles highlighted in this booklet of Gelsey Bell, Sheila Jordan, Fay Victor, Jen Shyu, Samuel Adler, and articles such as “Mormon Music: After the ‘Mormon Moment’” and “The Banjo Faces Its Shadow” all are designed to create connection around the voices of those engaged in the work. In the past year, we even did our first experiment in bringing that connection into the physical world, producing an event around music and storytelling by Matana Roberts, Joan Tower, and Gabriel Kahane to bring practitioners and appreciators closer together.

Our grantmaking programs directly support the work that’s at the heart of our world. Projects such as 95 Rituals (For Anna Halprin) and Trimpin’s Music Alive program residency with the Seattle Symphony embody connectivity among different generations of artists and between artists and the public.

In addition to doing the work represented here, we’re always looking ahead to new ways we can build our community further. We’re developing a patron network program that will connect individuals across the country who are passionate about engaging with and supporting new music. And we are also very excited to announce that New Music USA has recently been awarded a three-year grant from the Scherman Foundation that will allow us to build on our past work in supporting the DIY ensemble sector—a key part of our new music ecology.

Please join us in being an active part of this living, growing community! Creating a profile on newmusicusa.org, following a project, signing up for our email newsletter, and participating in a conversation on NewMusicBox are all easy and exciting ways to help grow and engage with the world of new music. There’s no better way to ensure the continued flourishing of American new music than to join with others in community.

Ed Harsh,
President and CEO

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New music is relevant music. Living creative musicians reflect on who we are, address questions we all have, challenge our preconceptions, enlighten and elevate us. While it is sometimes viewed as more abstract than other art forms, music has the ability to communicate through a language that can be commonly understood. It can also be a powerful interdisciplinary partner for work involving film, theater, dance, and more.

So while New Music USA is focused on building the new music community, this community doesn’t exist in isolation. It is an active part of our larger society and necessarily engages with a wide spectrum of contemporary issues and realities. Each artist finds her or his own pathway for this engagement. In reviewing the full collection of work emerging from New Music USA’s programming in 2015/16, I was struck by the range of those pathways and the trails they weave across the United States.

As you look through these pages you will see projects examining cultural heritage and experience such as Hannibal Lokumbe’s One Land, One River, One People, and Gerald Clayton’s Piedmont Blues. There is interdisciplinary work exploring the human relationship to boundaries in our world, such as LEIMAY’s multimedia Borders. Close examinations of issues affecting artists and others in our society are evident, as observed through week-long series on NewMusicBox devoted to topics such as “Mental Health and Musical Creativity.” Many adventures in the creation of new work are represented here, as with Ken Ueno’s new work in residency with the Alia Musica ensemble and Brian Baumbusch’s creations for the JACK string quartet in collaboration with the Lightbulb Ensemble gamelan. As always, the many profiles featured on NewMusicBox in the past year, represented here by those on Muhal Richard Abrams and Missy Mazzoli, included many insights on the connections between artist and community and society.

New Music USA is proud to bring forward the voices of artists in our community. I hope you will explore these voices further by visiting our website newmusicusa.org, and then further engage with the full range of new music that is present in our world every day. There’s such a diverse and exciting collection of music waiting to be discovered!

Ed Harsh

President and CEO

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This year has marked the beginning of a new chapter in our organization’s history. We have consolidated five of our previous grantmaking programs – Commissioning Music USA, Composers Assistance Program (CAP), CAP-Recording, Live Music for Dance, and Creative Connections – into a single, flexible program that allows us to serve more of the field, and to serve it well. This new program – dubbed simply as New Music USA’s project grants – combines developments in our grantmaking and technological infrastructure to fulfill the changing needs of 21st–century artists.

The evolution begins with an increased openness and flexibility in our grantmaking. By awarding more than $645,000 to 117 projects this year alone, we are supporting hundreds of composers, instrumentalists, presenters, choreographers, dance companies, and organizations from around the United States that are moving new American music forward. These awarded projects range from commissions and recordings involving small and large ensembles to interdisciplinary works featuring music along with dance, theater, film, sculpture, and even architecture and puppetry. As a whole, the funded projects span and eschew genre categories, pushing the boundaries of classical, jazz, and electronic music and venturing bravely into new, unfamiliar territory. Presenting artists and organizations with a simplified and generalized platform with minimized restrictions allows us to identify and fund these envelope-expanding projects, which may otherwise fall through the cracks.

Financial support of these projects is just the beginning. The launch of the project grants also marks the opening of a new chapter in public advocacy for new music. Each awarded project has its own project page, which can be updated by the project participants as it unfolds. These project pages form a gallery that provides a snapshot of the entire field of new American music, a mecca for music enthusiasts and a point of entry for new audiences. Visitors may create user accounts, follow projects of interest, and sign up to receive updates from artists. Through the project grants gallery, newmusicusa.org is positioned to become a venue for the public to discover and engage with the diverse range of American voices creating music today.

In reimagining our support for artists as an act of curation, we have created a streamlined and elegant web-based custom user platform – of a caliber typically associated with large technology companies – entirely in-house. By presenting applicants with a simplified grantmaking platform, we have opened the door to a wider range of new music projects that accommodates the needs of 21st–century artists. This web interface, which includes both public-facing project pages on newmusicusa.org as well as online application submission and panel review mechanisms, operated glitch-free through record-breaking submission traffic. We believe that this achievement has laid the groundwork for many longer-term developments, which will help us solidify the project gallery as a hub for the new American music community.

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“That a teenager living on a remote reservation would not only have the chance to create an original musical composition, but also see it come to life at the hands of a nationally renowned quartet [ETHEL] is thanks to the groundbreaking Native American Composers Apprentice Project,” describes the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program.

Every year, the Native American Composer Apprentice Project (NACAP) brings Native American composers from around the country to the Navajo, Hopi, and Salt River Pima-Maricopa Reservations to spend eight months mentoring high school students in composition. Through various education projects, the organization is helping bridge the space between the canyon and the concert hall by instilling the power and sophistication of Hopi traditional music into the lexicon of contemporary chamber music.

The music that the students write during the program is performed by professionals and recorded at venues across Arizona—including the Navajo Nation and Heard Museums, Scottsdale Community College, Arizona Opera, and the Grand Canyon Music Festival.

New Music USA’s support for the NACAP spans two rounds of project grants. This year, with our funding, the NACAP is partnering with the Arizona Opera on “Stories We Tell,” an initiative that will provide selected students with the opportunity to write micro-operas which the Arizona Opera will workshop twice over the course of the program. Last year, Trevor Reed, one of three current NACAP composers-in-residence, received a New Music USA project grant for a collaboration with composer Clark Tenakhongva and the Grand Canyon Music Festival. Reed works in a style he calls Puhutawi, which synthesizes Hopi music and contemporary chamber music. His piece, Puhutawi: A New Tradition in Hopi Sound, adapts the work of Clark Tenakhongva, a NAMMY-nominated creator of traditional Hopi music, and was previewed at the Grand Canyon Music Festival in September 2015, alongside new works by the participating NACAP students.

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“Composer Darrel Grant has said, ‘I believe that we who create art possess an extraordinary power to communicate, inspire, provoke, inform, and to move others to transform society.’ Across communities, new music is actively challenging us to pay attention to the issues and the voices in our society.”

In an essay published on NewMusicBox this past year, Christina Rusnak reflects on how composers and performers are “looking at the diverse landscapes in which we live, with their complex human histories and changing values, as the grounds to examine the intersection of place and people—past and present.”

There are countless new music works composed today specifically geared towards political activism, social criticism, and raising awareness. Ethan Ganse Morse’s opera The Canticle of the Black Madonna responds to 9/11 and addresses PTSD; cellist Kari Juusela composed PBBP in response to the British Petroleum oil spill on the Gulf coast in 2010; Brian Harnetty critiqued the human and environmental impacts of the extraction industries of southeastern Ohio through music as well as his writings for NewMusicBox; and Joan Szymko worked for months with families and patients with Alzheimer’s to try and understand their experiences and have their voices heard through her choral work Shadow and Light.

Music has the power to heal. Music also has the power to advocate for the changes needed in our society by engaging audiences with them on deeper, more emotional levels and from a wide variety of different perspectives.

 “New music can advocate for the changes needed in our society by connecting us to issues larger than ourselves. … By creating works that look to the diverse landscapes in which we live as a foundation, the intersection of place and people expands our musical palette. The resulting pieces may become some of the most compelling works of our time.” 

­

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For the past fifteen years, our online media hub NewMusicBox has consistently dove below the surface to produce deep, award-winning coverage and content that resonates at the heart of the new music community. We’ve published thousands of posts about new music in America, including hundreds of articles and videos, and all of it is still available online; a living history of a decade-and-a-half of American music that is available to everybody who has internet access.

The depth and investigative rigor of these conversations has made NewMusicBox the go-to source for hardhitting American new music journalism, and the site is frequently cited by larger publications in their coverage of our field. Our articles about the field and profiles of composers will remain important in the years to come. In fact, the Yale University Library’s Oral History of American Music (OHAM) has worked with us to archive and preserve many of our artist profiles for future study and reference.

To celebrate the occasion of our fifteenth anniversary, our editors rummaged through the archives, providing a year-by-year reflection on the lessons of our past. “Admittedly, we uncovered broken links and some dated graphics,” writes Molly Sheridan, executive editor of NewMusicBox, “but much larger messages transcended those cosmetic wrinkles – lessons from the artists we’ve spoken with about success and frustration, cash and creativity, living to make music and making music to make a living.”

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In the tradition of American composer-educators such as Aaron Copland and Serge Koussevitzky, Samuel Adler has mentored a generation of young composers, guiding their training by providing a thorough grounding in the Western tradition. In his 2015 interview with NewMusicBox, Adler reflected both on his composition and teaching careers, saying: “I’m very inspired by my students… I see the problems that students have that I also have. Sometimes I solve them for myself by solving them for the students. That’s a great influence on me, as has being with young people, and always being fed new ideas. This has inspired me all my life.”

The 87-year-old Adler has written six symphonies, five operas, a dozen concertos, and ten string quartets (eight of which he still acknowledges), as well as multiple sonatas and choral pieces while also teaching for 63 years.  Adler, who studied with a who’s who of 20th-century American musicians—Aaron Copland, Roger Sessions, Walter Piston, Randall Thompson, Paul Hindemith, and Serge Koussevitzky—has held positions at The University of North Texas, Eastman, and Juilliard. For those of us in the new music field, Adler’s importance to his students is legendary, and we were reminded of that once again when his April 2015 NewMusicBox Cover Profile was our most viewed of the year and received over 1,000 likes on Facebook and over 5,000 views, largely thanks to his students, current and past, enthusiastically sharing the article via social media. In the interview, Adler talked about what makes a good teacher:

“I feel the teacher’s task is first and foremost to inspire the student to write as much as possible without any consideration for style and things like that. And then, slowly, to see if he or she can be moved to be something very special. And many of them can and do. I’m very happy with the result if you don’t immediately say, ‘I only want 12-tone music’ or ‘I only want tonal music.’ Let them bring you something, and go from there…”

Published on NewMusicBox- April 1, 2015

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“The entire building becomes an instrument…” —The Austin Chronicle

 

Imagine what instruments with names such as the “Long String Instrument,” the “Owl,” “Skiffs,” or the “Bow Box” might sound like. Now imagine a full piece of music using these instruments, consuming the room and turning the entirety of Austin’s Saengerrunde Hall into one massive resonating body. The Austin Chronicle describes the experience as being “like a chorus of Buddhist monks, chanting at the bottom of a vast cavern. Like a chorus of triple-lunged, robotic Buddhist monks, their voices humming and thrumming to fill acoustic space with shifting drones that might emanate from their creator’s soul.”

 

Ellen Fullman first debuted her 100-foot “Long String Instrument” 12 years ago in one of the few available spaces that could accommodate the massive instrument’s installation—a former candy factory. Since then, she has been collaborating with composer Travis Weller on projects that have been performed at the University of Texas as part of the Music in Architecture/Architecture in Music Symposium, the Berkeley Art Museum, and the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. With the help of New Music USA’s project grant support, the collaborators were able to present their newest piece Coffee County Tennessee, a concert-length composition that explores the duo’s collection of both self-built and traditional instruments (violin and viola) to create an enormous, captivating, and unforgettable sound world.

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We’ve all heard houses speak: stairs creaking, floorboards thundering under our feet, appliances drumming, lamps buzzing. But what if the structures in which we take refuge and relax – the places where we start and end our days – actually became the tools for music making? New Orleans Airlift, a multi-disciplinary arts producer, has answered just this question. Inspired by “the twin pillars of New Orleans culture, Music & Architecture,” the group salvaged the remains from neglected old houses and built an entire village of musical structures: “Stairs became pipe organs, floorboards became amplifiers,” writes The Huffington Post. “In some cases the entire structure was an instrument itself.”

The village, dubbed The Music Box, A Shantytown Sound Laboratory, was the subject of widespread intrigue and critical acclaim. NPR’s Ann Powers commented: “High concept and nontraditional as it may be, The Music Box has found a place in the long history of New Orleans music.” An immensely diverse cast of leading artists including Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Andrew WK, Ben Jaffe (Preservation Hall Jazz Band), Mannie Fresh (Cash Money Records), and Dickie Landry (founding member of Phillip Glass Ensemble) performed at The Music Box for more than 1,500 people, a third of them students, and many additional hours were reserved for the public to visit – and play – the village.

Fresh off the heels of The Music Box, New Orleans Airlift has launched a new, traveling musical village called Dithyrambalina. With the New Music USA project grant awarded in February along with additional funding, the village of musical structures will visit communities across New Orleans and potentially, the broader United States. “Imagine waking up to singing houses at the end of your block!” they write. So far, the village has taken up residence in Shreveport, LA, and presented performances involving dozens of artists, musicians, and dancers. “The most important thing to us is the idea that old, run-down looking things still have value,” New Orleans Airlift and Dithyrambalina co-founder Jay Pennington has said. “And that the value that they have is in the stories that they carry. And those stories can be brought to life through music, giving life to architecture, so that people can live with it, experience it, and learn what there is to learn from what’s left behind.”

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Wild Rumpus is a new music collective with roots in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York whose name captures the spirit of their mission: “[By] creating a space for experimentation, risk-taking, and dialogue, we hope to be challenged and excited by the music we make, and to support the artistic/technical growth of the composers who work with us. We want to share this process in a way that sparks the curiosity and intelligence of our audience and draws them into the adventurous, eclectic world of new music.”

This year, Wild Rumpus received a New Music USA project grant for their new recording In Time. Drawing from a multiplicity of styles, Wild Rumpus commissioned composers Jen Wang, Dan VanHassel, Joshua Carro, and Per Bloland.

Referencing poetry, music, and literature from Bali, Argentina, Norway, England, and the United States—sometimes in the same piece—the commissioned works on In Time exemplify the power of American new music to create connections between what seem at first to be unrelated artistic disciplines, musical genres, and global cultural traditions.

Inspired by Jorge Luis Borges’s poem of the same name, Wang’s Adrogué features “textures [that] coalesce and deform in a vibrant, constantly shifting collage” like “the fragile, elusive images of the poem.”  VanHassel’s Incite combines heavy metal and Balinese gamelan, highlighting the shared “emphasis on rhythmic virtuosity, often at high speeds.”  Wang’s second piece on the album, Weird Fishes/ Arpeggi, is an adaptation of Radiohead’s 2007 song of the same name whose “rich harmony, hypnotic polyrhythms, and seamless form that slowly builds throughout the piece [lends itself] to adaptation for performance by Wild Rumpus.”  Carro’s Spectral Fields In Time is a phenomenological study of sound that explores “the experience of realizing the greater sense and possibilities of sound when not constricted by traditional constructs or expectations,” and Bloland’s Solis Overture reworks traditional Scandinavian music to create the piece that will open his planned opera which “will [chronicle] the fictionalized tale of an actual Norwegian author, Pedr Solis.”

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Muhal Richard Abrams, a founding member of the AACM, has worked with a long list of heralded artists—Max Roach, Dexter Gordon, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Art Farmer, and Anthony Braxton—and so many more. Yet simultaneously, the 85-year-old Abrams has also been active as a composer of works for string quartet, orchestra, and solo piano, having had premieres by such ensembles as the Kronos Quartet, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, and the Brooklyn Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra.

 

His extensive and prolific career aside, Abrams’s wisdom and pedagogy reaches beyond just being a performer and composer. Abrams met with Frank J. Oteri this past January to discuss his take on genre, musical boundaries, old verses new, and his approach to music as “just sound.”

 

 “The word jazz can be confusing. … But if we say music, it could be anywhere. It’s just music. The next question, what type of music? Okay. No type of music. Just sound. You know, because that’s what it is. Sound. Before it’s even organized into any kind of continuum that we would call music, it’s just sound. … A style name limits the scope or the focus and that turns out to be unfair to quite a number of people.”

 

To Abrams, categorizations, labels, and definitions are constructs that can serve to limit us. Old music can be reinvented as something new, and new music can be reminiscent of the past; a composition could be an improvisation and an improvisation a composition. This non-dualistic and boundary-less approach clearly reflects itself in his own music and diverse accomplishments as an artist and has a lot to offer today’s world of genre-bending and border-breaking new music.

 

“In reference to people saying this is old or this is new, if it’s old for you, then it’s old for you. If it’s new for you, it’s new for you. But those are just terms that are useful to describe the particular mood that that person or those people are feeling. None of it’s real because the situation that is characterized as old often times is revisited and found to be useful for some future purpose. And something new can be visited and found that is reminiscent of something that’s old.”

 

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Published on NewMusicBox – January 1, 2014

Composer-vocalist Lisa Bielawa radiates a contagious and infectious energy; being around her makes the impossible seem possible. She’s also an organizer; in 1996, she co-founded MATA, a festival commissioning and celebrating work by young composers. NewMusicBox’s Molly Sheridan sought out Bielawa for a Cover Profile interview, which touched on the rewards of collaboration, the composer’s large-scale works – including a massive piece for 800 musicians on an airfield – and getting the party started:

Collaboration for me means that you’re beholding the amazingness of some other person and what they can do. Then I’m using my own abilities as a composer to make that shine or to engage with it. That’s a really great way to know people in the world, right?

It’s inconvenient for me sometimes that I end up wanting to write pieces for hundreds of musicians on an abandoned airfield. But it’s even more inconvenient to try to fit into certain assigned ways of making work that don’t fit. So I’ve accepted that I have to make it work for myself and the best way for me to do that is to go ahead and see things in terms of the larger picture and in terms of broader strokes – whether or not an individual performance or composition is seen that way. I need to see it that way in order to make it work for me and in order to make the best work I can.

But that’s also kind of what I do, too. I want to go somewhere and I start a party. I get the party going. Then, when the party is at its fullest, I like to sneak away and start another party somewhere else. I wrote it into the piece, and I didn’t even realize I did that. I don’t know why that is. Leaving a party at its height – that’s heartbreakingly beautiful – and then you go somewhere else. That’s my role. I start fires, you know, and then I leave.

 

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“[Trimpin’s residency] is such a lesson in creativity… [it demonstrates] that exciting stuff is happening in concert halls,” enthuses Ludovic Morlot, music director of the Seattle Symphony in an April 2015 interview with Seattle reporter Dave Beck. Trimpin’s piece, a site-specific work for the lobby of Benaroya Hall that incorporates prepared piano, kinetic instruments, and a variety of players, is unique even for the Seattle Symphony, which makes it a point to regularly program new music. The applause following Trimpin’s premiere was so enthusiastic that the musicians repeated the third movement of the piece as an encore.  Morlot describes that collaborating with Trimpin has “taken me out of my comfort zone,” physically (and metaphorically) moving the symphony out of the hall and forcing both Morlot and the players to expand their understanding of what symphony music can be.

Trimpin’s boundary-breaking residency is one of the current Principal Residencies of Music Alive, a program created and administered by New Music USA in partnership with the League of American Orchestras and made possible through major support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. These three-year residencies include premieres of new work, youth engagement activities, and performances from the composer’s existing oeuvre. This year the program also saw fruitful activity at the Albany Symphony in their collaboration with the Sleeping Giants Collective (Timo Andres, Andrew Norman, Jacob Cooper, Christopher Cerrone, Robert Honstein, and Ted Hearne); in Stella Sung’s residency with the Dayton Performing Arts Alliance; with Narong Prangcharoen at the Pacific Symphony; and in Gabriela Lena Frank’s residency with the Detroit Symphony.

In addition to the Principal Residencies, Music Alive also supports shorter residencies, called New Partnerships, that create new relationships among orchestras and composers who previously have not worked together. These are focused, one-week residencies that represent an important step in creating long-lasting working relationships between American orchestras and American composers, ensuring that the music reaches audiences who are ready to embrace it. This year’s list of awardees includes: Clarice Assad and the Boston Landmarks Orchestra, Douglas J. Cuomo and the Grant Park Music Festival, Annie Gosfield and the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, Takuma Itoh and the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, Jingling Luo and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Missy Mazzoli and the Boulder Symphonic Orchestra, Rick Robinson and the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, Carl Schimmel and the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, Laura Schwendinger and the Richmond Symphony, Derrick Spiva and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Sumi Tonooka and the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra, and finally Dan Visconti and the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra.

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During the 2015-2016 season, composer Ken Ueno held a series of lectures and workshops, created a new work for chamber ensemble, and had the city premiere of his concerto for overtone singer and orchestra in Pittsburgh—all thanks to an exciting and action-packed year-long residency with the Alia Musica ensemble that New Music USA was proud to support.

 

Ueno’s commissioned chamber piece with oboe and snare drum, titled Sawdust on Ararat, was premiered by the Alia Musica ensemble in May 2016. The residency also resulted in Ueno’s orchestral work On a Sufficient Condition for the Existence of the Most Specific Hypothesis, which premiered in November 2015. The composer describes this work as a representation of his “first attempt to reconcile the multiplicity of being a ‘classical’ composer and ‘experimental’ improviser.” The piece explores the extended vocal techniques he utilizes as an improviser such as throat singing, overtone singing, singing multi-band multiphonics, circular breathing, and sub-tones.

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Christopher Cerrone’s Invisible Cities is unlike any opera you’ve ever witnessed. It’s a new kind of immersive experience, brought to you via state-of-the-art wireless Sennheiser headphones as you freely roam through LA’s historic Union Station (or wherever they decide to do it next). It’s been heralded as “a delicate and beautiful opera” that “could be, and should be, done anywhere” by the Los Angeles Times; “a subtle and beautiful musical meditation on travel, cultural differences, death, and memory” by LA Weekly; and even called “the opera of the future” by Wired Magazine. And, to top it all off, the piece was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Music this year.

Critics aren’t the only ones who have been amazed by Invisible Cities. Crowds of people have gathered for more than 22 sold out performances. They’ve also shared their experiences widely on social media, including nearly 1,000 photos posted to Instagram alone.

We are pleased to have been one of the first organizations to lend grant support to this unique opus, first with a grant from our Composer’s Assistance Program last year, and then again with a project grant this year supporting a recording of the opera with the full original cast. The album will be released this fall by The Industry, the producer of the original production, as their first step into the realm of recorded music, with additional distribution through Record Union. It will also be available at every performance from Invisible Cities’ upcoming international tour. Pick up your copy when it comes out, grab your headphones, and listen on the go: you’ll see the opera that’s playing out all around you.

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For many of us, homelessness is not a reality we can conceive of—it’s a problem so large and unimaginable that we often ignore and fail to empathize with those whom it befalls.  Cuban-born dancer Alexey Taran trained with Havana’s National School of Art before moving to Venezuela, where he and his roommate, who is also a dancer, suddenly found themselves homeless after being evicted from their rooming house. Homelessness is, as Taran later told Miami Art Zine, “something that can happen to anybody […] when we had to sleep, we always took turns. It was very hard.”

After a fortuitous but unsurprising Guggenheim Fellowship relocated Taran and his partner, Carla Forte, to Miami, he began to notice many similarities between Miami and cities he had previously lived in. “It wasn’t only the beautiful things: the beautiful beach, the beautiful face on the city, but there is another city too. Sometimes it’s very frustrating, because you see these people sitting in front of the bank, or sleeping in front of very fancy stores.” The experiences of that difficult period of his life—cast with characters whose hardship “doesn’t discriminate on race, gender identity, nationality, religion, sexual orientation”—became the artistic basis for TRIBE: life in gestures. An examination of homelessness in Miami, the work explores desperation, struggle, and grit through an evocative performance which integrates dance, electronic, and video art. Joining a dance company ultimately saved Taran, and he sought to use his opportunity to honor those less fortunate around him.

For this intensely reflective work, Venezuelan composer and experimental sound artist Gustavo Matamoros crafted a score that uses seedy, bit-crushed sounds, astringent tone oscillations, and a live drummer, who at certain times drives the dancing with frenetic pounding—not unlike a street performer. In other moments, Matamoros chooses silence, allowing the full depth of Taran’s directorial and choreographic vision to come through: “a reflection on compassion and the need to turn our community into a more humane space concerned its most powerless members: a work that draws out the individual within the collective in a search for common ground.”

TRIBE: life in gestures was commissioned by the On.Stage Black Box series at Miami-Dade County Auditorium and presented April 2-5, 2015. In addition to the staged performance, the project included a series of screenings and informal presentations during the months of January and March that took place at Miami-Dade county shelters. New Music USA awarded Taran and Matamoros a project grant for TRIBE, an important social enterprise in fine art and performance that casts a distinct and intense illuminating light on problems we often keep hidden in the dark.

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“The murderess confesses her crimes. She is hanged and publicly dissected at a spiritual carnival. Can morality be found in one’s body?”

In 18th-century England, criminals were publicly dissected in front of an audience eager to find out exactly where evil resided in the body. This past June in LA, such a morbid spectacle took place again, but with one key difference—the criminal’s bloody, naked corpse sang arias throughout the duration of her own autopsy.

Composer David Lang and librettist/designer Mark Dion’s experimental multi-media opera anatomy theater is provocative, fascinating, and gory to say the least. Produced by Beth Morrison Projects, performed by the LA Opera, and supported by New Music USA, the work possesses a surreal grandeur—intermeshing facets of stunning visual art, new music, theater, opera, film, and projections to explore societal fear, identity, and conception of self. The protagonist, the battered woman Sarah Osborne, confessed to the murder of her husband and two kids, and attributed her crimes to the tortured life she had lead in perpetual suffering.

“Sarah sings of her heart, the heart that loved her children, a good heart that was perverted by society. … It’s not who we are, she makes us understand, but what we do to each other that creates monsters.” —Los Angeles Times

“No singers were harmed in the creation of this opera,” Lang assured us.

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Published on NewMusicBox – September 23-27, 2013

As the summer came to a close and school began to re-enter many of our minds, NewMusicBox hosted Education Week, an intensive, week-long marathon dedicated to exploring the new technologies and fresh learning methods that are advancing music education, inside and outside of the classroom. The focus on the topic was site-wide, and almost all content shared on NewMusicBox that week from our regular contributors (and some special guests) was part of the conversation. This was our first extended period of producing content devoted to a single theme, and it allowed our editors, columnists, and readers to immerse themselves in the issue through input from multiple voices.

Topics ranged from the relationship between contemporary pedagogy and participatory culture (“Inviting Possibilities for New Music and Music Education”) to the idea of reversing damaging habits of mind ingrained by a previous instructor (“Unteaching”). The pros and cons of everything from employing expedient untruths in music education (“On Lying to My Students”) to the normalizing of music education (“Standards and Creativity”) were discussed. There was even a “modern music alma mater” composed for us to all sing together (“Hail to Thee, and Sing Out!”).

“While maverick music makers who build their art well outside traditional institutions were certainly not invented in 2013, advances in technology have multiplied and publicized the myriad routes students may follow,” writes Executive Editor Molly Sheridan. “In parallel to the ways we’ve seen the boundaries of genre blur and meld, education and career paths have been derailed and resurfaced; others have completely gone off road. So how do you get to be a new music composer or performer today? How do you connect with the music and grow as a listener?”

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The slogan of this year’s Edgefest, now in its 19th iteration, “Wake Up Calls From The Edge,” exemplifies the festival’s willingness to examine the blurry edges between musical genres. Held at Kerrytown Concert House in Ann Arbor, Edgefest is a destination for the improvised music community. Focusing each year on a different instrument, Edgefest regularly gathers an incredibly diverse group of composers and players for a weekend of consistently exciting and challenging music.

The October 2015 Edgefest is all about trumpet music, and New Music USA is incredibly excited about the lineup that we’ve helped support, which includes Taylor Ho Bynum, Peter Evans, Joe McPhee, and composer Jason Kao Hwang. Over the past twenty years, “Edgefest has gained a reputation as one of the most innovative music festivals in this country; presenting world-class cutting-edge jazz, creative improvisation, and category-defying music often ignored in the commercial marketplace. The artists/composers who participate in Edgefest and its various outreach activities increase the public’s appreciation for and understanding of this creative and improvisational musical genre, as well as promote their own individual and unique compositions.” We can’t wait to see what the festival does next!

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A candid and wide-ranging conversation between NewMusicBox senior editor Frank J. Oteri and Missy Mazzoli in her Greenpoint, Brooklyn apartment brought forward reflections on how she uses lyricism and melody to explore human vulnerability and intimacy, discussion of her range of inspirations, and an examination of her multifaceted composition career.

 

“My goal is to try to draw the listener in with something that is familiar, even just a tiny bit, whether it’s a little repeated melodic fragment or the sound of the harmonica, which is a sound that everybody knows. Most people have picked up a harmonica and have blown into it. We know that sound. So I try to draw people in with something that they can latch onto, but then twist it and present it in a different way, present the melody with a strange chord underneath. Or have the harmonicas be this insistent repeating drone that becomes unsettling.”

 

With an incredibly diverse array of influences and a unique genre-bending approach, Mazzoli’s work to date has ranged from touring with classical/indie-rock band Victoire to composing orchestral, operatic, and solo piano works. She shed light on the levels of intimacy and different kinds of relationships she has to her music when performing within her own group, writing for an ensemble, or working on an orchestra commission.

 

“[I am] finding different answers to the question of how to bring an intimate, vulnerable, human experience to a situation like working with an orchestra, which is a little bit disconcerting and I feel kind of disconnected as a composer for a couple different reasons. … If my only outlet was to make these marks on a page and then deliver it to people who I would never meet, I would be really depressed. I created this band, and I perform, and I write for my friends, and I try to be intimately involved with people who are in the process of performing my music to counteract that, to maintain some sense of control and involvement on every level.”

 

 

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The New York Times critic Nate Chinen observed “a moment of deep, transfixing confluence between the composer and his partners for the evening” during the New York premiere of acclaimed composer-pianist Vijay Iyer’s piece Time, Place, Action, written for the Brentano String Quartet. “It arrived in a largely improvised second movement, as a single sustained note slowly morphed into something as layered and ephemeral as a rolling cloud bank. Mr. Iyer’s first piano chord brought a bolt of clarity, and with it a blush of instant communion.”

Iyer’s aim with Time, Place, Action, which was created with support from a New Music USA project grant, is to put “the spirit of real-time invention in dialogue with the meticulous interpretative art of the string quartet”:

What the two approaches have in common is a focus on the experience of sound in time; the priority in both cases is not only the articulation of form, but also a heightened attention to moment-to-moment interaction and the flow of aural sensation. That zone (between score and experience, let’s say) is where this piece is meant to dwell.

In creating the work, which was co-commissioned and premiered on March 14 by the 92 Street Y, Iyer drew inspiration from flocking, an improvisational form of dance in which “a group takes its collective cue from a leader, like birds in migration.” The piece invests agency in the performers to animate the notated passages – which are designed to maximize resonance and are propelled by Iyer’s singular gestural language – with their own spontaneous decision making. “By highlighting the intentionality of the soundmaking process,” writes Iyer, “I strive to embrace each performer’s selfhood.”

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Few characters in the broad story of American culture are as ubiquitous as the jazz singer. The enormous contributions made by artists such as Billie Holiday, Dinah Washington, Sarah Vaughan, Ella Fitzgerald, and so many others are still with us today. A look to the worlds of hip-hop and turntablism—for instance, Venetian Snare’s breakbeat re-imagining of Holiday—reveal just how we still consume their music today, even if indirectly through a degree of separation.
For three consecutive weeks in May 2015, NewMusicBox paid tribute to three important female jazz vocalists of diverse styles, whose careers span decades. Our “Singing It—Generations in Jazz” featured conversations with the extraordinary Sheila Jordan, Fay Victor, and composer-vocalist Jen Shyu.

Sheila Jordan: “My heart and soul were totally into this music from the first moment I heard four notes of Charlie Parker’s “Now’s The Time.” That’s the first [jazz] tune I ever heard. That was in high school. Before that I was always a singer. I sang on radio programs, amateur hours, and whatever. I was always singing as a kid. But I never knew what I wanted to sing until I heard “Now’s The Time” by Charlie Parker and his Reboppers. They weren’t even called Beboppers yet. That to me was the beginning. And I knew from that moment, I said, ‘Oh my God, this is the music I’ll dedicate my life to. This is it.’ I was a kid, but it was almost like I was a grown-up person all of a sudden.

… [Charlie Parker] became a very dear friend of mine. And he turned me on to so many things. After I moved from Detroit to New York, I had a wonderful loft where I used to have wonderful sessions. I was studying with Lennie Tristano at the time, but I had known Bird before that and he started coming up to my loft a lot. A couple of times he had an LP under his arm and he said, ‘I want you to hear something.’ He put it on and it had nothing to do with jazz. He turned me on to Hindemith. He turned me on to Béla Bartók. He turned me on to Stravinsky. I used to say, ‘Bird, I tried to play these tunes, but I hear it quicker than I can play it.’ He said, ‘Well, you got million dollar ears, so use your ears.’”

Fay Victor: “My earliest memories of music are probably hearing calypso and reggae and also Indian music… That was a big part, and also African-American music, urban contemporary music, especially of that period—people coming out of the Motown era and the Philly sound and also Aretha Franklin. And also around my house we listened to a bit of classical music, mainly Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky I didn’t really get into, but Beethoven I kind of dug…As it turned out, one of my closest friends as a child, her father was a serious jazz fan…I’d go over to their house, and I’d kind of hear sounds that I liked and that were appealing. But I didn’t know what I was really listening to. When I thought I was listening to jazz, it was things like Bob James or Earl Klugh. That’s what I thought was jazz, usually things I never admit.

Betty [Carter] was trying to be a musician and to improvise like a horn player would. So that was actually more compelling and more interesting. I also began to hear from other people that perhaps I had the dexterity to go that way. Also, the way she led her band. I saw Betty live a few times. The way she handled her band, to make them create in the moment what she wanted to do deeply influenced me. So when I got to have a band, I really made it a point that it wouldn’t be just the way singers have groups: the so-and-so trio, the so-and-so quartet. If you hear a lot of records, across the parameters, they are pretty much the same. The roles of the musicians are the same, regardless of arrangement. I wanted to develop a band in the sense of Betty Carter where I wanted it to have its own sonic universe, whatever that would become. So that became something interesting to work towards.”

In the introduction to the NewMusicBox profile of Jen Shyu, Frank J. Oteri wrote: “Admittedly Jen Shyu’s definition of jazz is extremely broad at this point. She was deeply influenced to go in her current music direction through formidable interactions with multi-instrumentalist Francis Wong, a pioneer of the Asian-American jazz movement, and her many years of performing with the omnivorous Steve Coleman in his group Five Elements. It’s a direction that took her from performing standards ‘wearing very sequiny dresses’ to writing her own material and becoming proficient on many traditional East Asian instruments and in many different traditional vocal techniques, including Indonesian sindhen and Korean p’ansori. In fact, her monodrama Solo Rites: Seven Breaths–which incorporates many of the techniques she acquired through her immersive Asian travels and synthesizes them into a fluid whole—is a far cry from what you might usually hear in most jazz venues. However, the mesmerizing performance I heard her give of it took place at The Jazz Gallery, a non-profit space that showcases experimental jazz. But is it still jazz?”

Jen Shyu: “I always will be trying to break down any preconceived notions of anything that I’m supposedly doing. The word jazz is in there because I do feel tied to the continuum—or the tradition—of innovation, and I think jazz is very unique in that way. It’s such a large and dangerous word, but I still feel like what Randy Weston said is that he’s a fan of the music. I still feel like I’ll always be a fan of it—the study and the honoring of those giants, the deep looking inside of it and knowing these musicians, seeking out elders. I feel tied to jazz in that way, and that has inspired a lot of what I do and how I go about doing it. And vocalist? Voice has become my main instrument, even though I think my first love was dance, and it still is a deep love of mine. But I find that the voice has allowed me passage into meeting people from every part of the world. Even if I don’t speak the language yet, if I explain I’m looking for these older songs, then if I sing a little from another culture, then they’ll understand what I’m looking for, just from hearing that. And then they’ll understand, ‘oh, this isn’t just someone wanting something from our culture.’ There’s a relationship that’s immediately built. I feel like I’m very lucky to have such a tool that can make that connection with people so quickly.”

Published on NewMusicBox- May 6, 13, and 20, 2015

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Jazz pianist, composer, and bandleader Gerald Clayton took us on a journey through the tobacco factories, farms, and warehouses of Durham, North Carolina, to explore the historic southern landscapes that echo the Piedmont Blues. During his week-long Duke Performances residency, Clayton examined this musical tradition’s aesthetics which are characterized by ragtime rhythms, fingerpicking guitar patterns, and powerful yet understated singing—a style that embodies the history of African-American oppression under Jim Crow laws and the aggressive racism and discrimination that was prevalent in the 1920s. The project sought to powerfully revive and reimagine this musical tradition’s rich history, serving as an homage to the African-American struggle.

 

Drawing from the roots established originally by Blind Boy Fuller, Etta Baker, and Elizabeth Cohen, Clayton’s project brought the tradition back to life with help from collaborators Lizz Wright, Tivon Pennicot, Dayna Stephens, Becca Stevens, and others. By extracting harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic ideas from the original tunes, the nine-piece ensemble produced “a series of songs that knowingly nod to the past, while being fundamentally contemporary.”

 

New Music USA’s project grant helped support the presentation of the work, which integrated projected films, new and archival photography, folklore, and music, together producing a powerful testimony to the African-American experience.

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Published on NewMusicBox – May 28, 2014

When the critic Eugene Holley, Jr. first heard the term “jazz police,” he thought it was “one of the many linguistic inventions and dimensions spawned by musicians – one of many verbal turns of fancy that have weaved in and out of the jazz lingua franca from New Orleans to Manhattan.” As time went on, however, he came to realize that the term had a more sinister connotation, resting in the idea that a conspiracy of critics and insiders control access to the commanding heights of the jazz world.

In “Profiling The Jazz Police,” an article that sparked a flurry of on- and off-site comments, Holley breaks apart the notion of such a secret society. He argues that, especially given today’s democratized information sharing paradigms and jazz’s waning popularity, critics and musicians can and should work together in the interests of the field at large:

A critic could write that a musician’s new CD is not his or her best work, but a few clicks and you can hear for yourself whether you agree with the writer’s opinion. A consumer can also share his or her opinions about any musician with other like-minded listeners in an instant. This type of democratized discourse did not exist thirty years ago, and I suspect it’s here to stay. And while sites like Facebook and Soundcloud feature fan reviews and accessible sound files, respectively, the democratic accessibility of that data does not guarantee that opinions offered by fans are any less biased than the professional critics. We are still in the Wild West stages of this phenomenon. And while writers and record companies have been taken down a notch, their digital demotion may be a pyrrhic victory, because it still rings with the spirit of ‘us’ versus ‘them.’ And nobody wins that contest these days.

Today, in an age where all jazz artists in America are underrated, musicians should know that, in my opinion, the overwhelming majority of jazz scribes and other individuals in the jazz infrastructure are there to help them, and, more

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Colombian folk music and jazz play off each other in beautiful and unexpected ways in Edmar Castañeda’s compositions. Castañeda grew up in Bogotá, playing the Colombian folk harp, or arpa llanera, and dancing joropo, a traditional Colombian folk dance, with his sister. He moved to New York at age 16 to live with his father, who was also a musician, and go to school, where he began his jazz education.

Trained as a trumpet player, because there was no harp in the school band, Castañeda spent his nights playing solo harp in restaurants to support himself. During these evenings, his daytime instruction percolated into his harp playing, inflecting his traditional treatment of the instrument with the idioms of modern jazz. Soon, he was attending jam sessions and, through his playing, dispelling doubts about the role of his beloved instrument in jazz. “Castañeda,” says New York Times critic Nate Chinen, “has a percussive interface with his instrument, saving the sweeping glissandi for special accents and otherwise using a sharp attack, all pluck and strum.” In a Tiny Desk Concert for NPR, Castañeda demonstrated his ability to simultaneously juggle two or three ideas, using momentary lapses in a left hand tumbao to drop in chord coloration, all while following an improvisational thread—an element of jazz mirrored in the llanera music in which he is rooted.

With a grant from New Music USA, Castañeda, trombonist Marshall Gilkes, and drummer/percussionist David Silliman took part in the June 2015 D.C. Jazz Festival. In an interview at the festival, Castañeda explained that for him “jazz is freedom” and playing jazz enables him to “show a different face for the harp” than people are accustomed to. Inspired by the music of Duke Ellington, Paquito de Rivera, and Charlie Parker, Castañeda grooves and improvises with the best of them. In his review of the performance, Malcolm Barnes called Castañeda a “jazz harp angel” and commended his “melodic interludes with deeply mystical sounds that were perfectly complemented by his two sidemen.”

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Music Alive is an orchestral residency program administered in association with the League of American Orchestras that is designed to empower composers and positively change the culture of orchestras and their communities.

 

Over the past year, we were able to witness Music Alive’s ability to accomplish this through our one-week New Partnership residencies. We saw, for example, how a composer can help augment an orchestra’s relationship with their community.  In his residency with the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, Rick Robinson encouraged the orchestra to give chamber performances in unconventional spaces such as bars, restaurants, and senior centers—something that he does with his own CutTime® ensemble. Through this experiment, the orchestra was able to serve larger segments of their community and also show that new music is truly for everyone.  We also saw that many orchestras went above and beyond this round to secure additional funding to add either extra time or more content to their residency and that the relationships brokered by Music Alive often end up being long lasting and fruitful for the composer.  For example, the Boston Landmarks Orchestra found additional funding to commission a piece from their Music Alive residency composer Clarice Assad.  On top of that, the relationship did not end with the end of the residency, as Assad will be premiering a new concerto with the Boston Landmarks Orchestra and Akron Symphony in 2017.

Residency pairings can also push orchestras to explore types of music they might not have otherwise. Sumi Tonooka is a jazz composer who applied to Music Alive in order to be able to work closely with an orchestra.  The South Dakota Symphony was so excited about the possibilities of this unconventional residency that they used additional funds to commission a piece from Tonooka, and that opportunity has opened doors in the orchestra world for her.  Derrick Spiva is a composer who is interested in “exploring connections between musical cultures” and brought this interest to his residency with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra.  In addition to presenting his work Prisms, Cycles, Leaps which has West African and Balkan influences, Spiva spoke to students, gave West African music workshops for young musicians, and participated in pre-concert talks with the Zadonu African Music and Dance Company to help audiences understand the rhythmic complexities of his music.  Spiva described his residency as being “humbling and inspiring.  It has made me believe even more strongly in the power of music to bring people from different cultural backgrounds together through a shared, communal, experience.”

 

In the program cycle completed with the 2015/16 season, Music Alive offered two types of residencies.  The first of these, Principal Residencies, were three years long and included deep engagement from the composer and the orchestra.  These residencies featured premiers of new work, community engagement activities, and performances of other work by the composer.  This past round, Music Alive awarded Principal Residencies to the Albany Symphony and the Sleeping Giant Collective (Timo Andres, Andrew Norman, Jacob Cooper, Christopher Cerrone, Robert Honstein, and Ted Hearne); the Dayton Performing Arts Alliance and Stella Sung; the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and Gabriela Lena Frank; the Pacific Symphony and Narong Prangcharoen; and the Seattle Symphony and Trimpin.

 

The New Partnership pairings that were supported by this past round of Music Alive are: Claire Assad and the Boston Landmarks Orchestra, Douglas J. Cuomo and the Grant Park Music Festival, Annie Gosfield and the Chautauqua Symphony Orchestra, Takuma Itoh and the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, Jingjing Luo and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Missy Mazzoli and the Boulder Symphonic Orchestra, Rick Robinson and the River Oaks Chamber Orchestra, Carl Schimmel and the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, Laura Schwendinger and the Richmond Symphony, Derek Spiva and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Sumi Tonooka and the South Dakota Symphony Orchestra, and Dan Visconti and the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra.

 

While this past year marked the end of a multi-year round of Music Alive, New Music USA was recently awarded a $1.5 million dollar grant from the Mellon Foundation that will support a reinvented version of Music Alive that beginning immediately with the 2016/17 season. This new cycle prioritizes collaborative work and immersive experiences for composers, orchestra musicians, artistic leadership, and community members.  Through these changes to Music Alive, we hope to demonstrate—through active partnership with the participating residency pairings and our colleagues at the League—the power and value of living creative artists working at the center of American orchestras.

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“For each immigrant artist, the struggle to cross the cultural barrier presents great challenge and opportunity,” writes choreographer Nai-Ni Chen. “Each person finds a way to adapt and improvise on [her/his] own, creating [an] imprint of movement, language, and thought patterns along the way.”

Seeking to create a work exploring the transmigratory experience, Chen reached out to composer Huang Ruo, a fellow émigré. Their collaboration, Crosscurrents, will take the form of a fifteen-minute work featuring seven dancers and four musicians within a context fortified by sound, stage, choreography, set, and lighting design. The focus of the work will be the imprints described above: the physical and psychological byproducts of the highly individual experience of negotiating identity within a new culture. Chen and Ruo will work together this summer to synthesize a vocabulary of sound and movement inspired by this experience, which will serve as the foundation for the development of the piece (to be premiered in 2015).

Song of the Jasmine, a collaboration between choreographers Aparna Ramaswamy and Ranee Ramaswamy and composer-saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, is also centered on navigating the bicultural experience. Drawing inspiration from the transformative work of the Bhakti poets, who “redefined notions of the self by reconceiving spirituality apart from established ritual” in medieval India, the artists unite their unique perspectives in an exploration of American identity, global citizenship, and the divine. Premiered at the Walker Art Center in May, Song of the Jasmine was also a recipient of the National Dance Project Award.

Movement and sound are inextricably linked, and dance and music have a long and fruitful history of exchange to show for it. We supported both the creation of and the live music for Crosscurrents and Song of the Jasmine, and target funding every year to help ensure the continuation of this dialogue between composers, performers, choreographers, and dancers. In particular, we seek to enable the presentation of well-rehearsed, new live music during dance performances, which is frequently otherwise impossible due to financial restrictions. “Dancers hear music differently,” Mahanthappa explains. “They don’t deal with music like musicians do, regardless of the fact that this tradition is obviously so tied to music and tied to rhythm. It’s been really different so it’s fun to try to get inside of that too…it’s a whole interactive process between all ten of us.”

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For Gelsey Bell, musical success is not contingent upon perfection, polish, or even, well, success: “I love an aesthetic of mistakes. I want things to get a little messy. I’m not interested in the sounds of perfection.” Hailed by The New York Times as a “winning soprano,” Bell began as a singer-songwriter, a path she ultimately deviated from in search of a wider, more musically curious range of collaborators. As she opened herself to other kinds of music, Bell found herself increasingly drawn to the experimental music community in New York City. Attracted to its dedication to collaboration, exploration, and openness, Bell found a home in new music, joining the ensemble thingNY and the performance collective Varispeed, among others. Rather than abandoning her past, Bell now uses the song form that she believes in to create the genre-bending work that fits with the experimental music she loves.

NewMusicBox editor Molly Sheridan sat down with Bell in February 2015 for a Spotlight Session, during which they dug into the numerous idiosyncratic aspects of her work. In “Cradle,” Bell “spends some time coaxing the audience [closer] before she begins to sing” into the metallophone nestled lovingly in her arms, her dangling earrings striking the metal keys of the instrument. For a piece like “Bathroom Songs,” Bell invites the audience into the cramped space with her. As she sings, she sways her hips and slinks against the wall. These songs are more than words and music; they are performances in the theatrical sense, where gesture and setting weigh equally with the sonic elements of the work.  Given this propensity, Bell thinks extensively about the comfort level of her audience, describing how she works hard to establish boundaries while simultaneously shaping the performance to suit the specific group watching.

Since completing her PhD in performance studies at New York University in January 2015, Bell has increasingly been exploring how to cohesively bring together her background as a singer-songwriter and the experimental music that truly excites her to create daring, boundary-breaking new work:

“I feel like I’m at this place of total exploration and I’m just having faith that I’m going to come out with something. I feel like I’m really in that mode where you’re just like, okay, I’m an artist. I have to let myself fail. I have to try a million things. I have to hate stuff, I have to love stuff, and I have to trust that if I put something on that’s really horrible it won’t be that no one wants to see anything that I do ever again. And just have faith that this kind of dream of some sort of sound that I have in my head that doesn’t have these intense boundaries can happen.”

Published on NewMusicBox- February 18, 2015

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Gifted New Jersey youth, arts institutions, and musicians have been coming together throughout 2016 with one common goal: creating a city anthem that will represent the urban experience, cultural heritage, and high hopes for the future of Newark—all just in time to celebrate the city’s 350th anniversary later in 2016.

 

Educator, musician, and audio engineer Spencer Frohwirth, the co-founder of the organization Collaborate Audio Lab, partnered with institutions and educators who work with a diverse population of local youth in Newark. Holding songwriting workshops and working closely with mentors and recording engineers, Newark In Tune fostered an enriching musical experience that inspires learning through teamwork, self-expression, and positive communication in a safe, fun, and professional environment. Frohwirth describes the goal for the project to be “the creation of a city-wide anthem that will represent our urban experience, cultural heritage, and combined hopes for the future of this wonderful city.”

 

Through a project grant, New Music USA was able to support a unique commissioning process that incorporated education and outreach into a civic project, culminating in a number of workshops, events, and performances throughout Newark, and a professionally produced song that will be made available to the public online.

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Published on NewMusicBox - April 16, 2014

We first heard about the pianist-composer Aaron Parks when he was a teenager, but a lot has happened since then. Parks, who just turned 30, has matured musically as well, and has released albums of his own music on the storied Blue Note and ECM imprints. He has also collaborated with a broad range of artists on the stage and in the studio ranging from improviser-composers Kurt Rosenwinkel and Terence Blanchard to South Korean-born vocalist Yeahwon Shin and CANT, the solo project of Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor. We caught up with Parks for a Spotlight Session, in which we discussed the importance of reaching both the mind and the body in music, Arvo Pärt, and inhabiting the music fully as a performer:

I like music and I like songs and I like sounds. … I like to put myself in situations where I’m a little bit out of my comfort zone. I do also want to have some sort of entry point to the music, though. I want to be challenged all the time, but I don’t want to only be challenged in my head. So music which is purely cerebral, or feels that way to me, I don’t tend to have quite as much of an attraction towards. But if it’s cerebral and I can dance to it, or it makes me feel something, there’s more of a chance.

One of the problems with the scene today is everybody is so busy doing so many different things. Most people are pretty proficient at doing a lot of things; you can give somebody some music and they’ll read all of the notes and it’ll be great. But then they’re onto the next gig. I don’t want music to just be information like that. … There’s a focus on being an individual; you’ve got to do your own thing at all costs, being original so to speak. But they focus on that one particular side of what original means. Originality is not only creating something new, it’s also having authentic presence – being fully present in the interpretation of what you’re doing. … I want people who can play a part – inhabiting it fully – and make me believe a melody. I don’t want you to play the melody; I want you to sing it to me. That’s a rare thing.

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Novels and plays often provide the inspiration for operas; composers from Puccini to Berg have written music for the literature that surrounds them, but we rarely come across operas based on scholastic work that delves deep into the history of a musical movement the way George Lewis’s Afterword, The AACM (as) Opera does with his 2007 book, The AACM: A Power Stronger than Itself. Founded on the South Side of Chicago fifty years ago, the AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) was and still is a formidable player in the avant-garde music community, nurturing the early careers of many now-legendary jazz musicians including Jack DeJohnette, Henry Threadgill, Amina Claudine Myers, and Anthony Braxton. Drawing together a range of practitioners steeped in the worlds of avant-garde jazz, classical, and world music and dedicated to creative music based in improvisation,  the AACM is devoted to “nurturing, performing, and recording serious, original music.”

An “aesthetic extension” of the organization’s story, Afterword, The AACM (as) Opera, a sprawling stage production created by Lewis and longtime collaborators Catherine Sullivan and Sean Griffin, premiered at Roulette in concert version in May 2015 with support from a New Music USA project grant. Like many 19th-century German novels, Lewis explains that Afterword “is a kind of coming-of-age opera, a bildungsoper. So, I’m looking at the ways people in the AACM came of age and what they faced along the way.”

The Roulette performance featured three singers accompanied by members of the International Contemporary Ensemble. The fully-staged opera will be premiered at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago this coming season and will feature “pre-structured music, text, scenography, and movement in juxtaposition with analogous elements improvised in real time. The opera’s singers will be called upon to act and move, as well as taking on multiple roles, creating and transforming their own appearances and personae.”

New York Times critic Corinna da Fonseca-Wollheim applauded Lewis’s cerebral composition, calling the music “bracingly dissonant, with spiky vocal lines and fragmented utterances from the ensemble.” Afterword is an exploratory work that heightens an awareness of the AACM as an important institution where race, genre, politics, and art intersected to create a social and musical movement with deep and lasting roots.

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“Seven bodies stand in near darkness. A stripe of light falls across them, then another and another until the human shapes are stratified. … [S]olid flesh appear[s] to melt.” —The New York Times

 

The collision of sound, dance, light, and installations that make up the multi-disciplinary work, Borders achieves something otherworldly. Seven dancers’ movements are dissected and stunningly enhanced with the use of a 12-channel projection of textural light. Choreographed by the Brooklyn-based artistic duo LEIMAY, the work seeks answers to contemporary urban social questions: As individuals within a global city constantly negotiating or carrying borderlines with us, how does this shape the ways in which we engage the world? When do we transgress our own boundaries? When do we become borders ourselves?

 

For Borders, LEIMAY teamed up with composer Joe Diebes, a fellow Brooklynite whose work explores the convergence of electronic music, sound art, visual art, and live performance. The powerful and haunting landscape the piece evokes investigates human physicality by exploring the presence of its performers illuminated by lighting effects in meditative stillness and primitive disjointed movement, while enveloping its spectators in the sounds of live and digitally manipulated voices layered atop piano and electronics. In their project grant application the LEIMAY team noted, “With Borders, we will delve into what these aspects of borders mean in order to raise questions of how our choices and strategies for making connections, affecting, and being affected impact the world around us.”

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It is hard to overstate the impact of the current wave of small ensembles and organizations on the new music field. These trailblazers are bringing irreplaceable vitality to America’s musical landscape, giving voice to our living composers, organizing and mobilizing world-class performers, and engaging a whole new generation of listeners.

New Music USA remains firmly committed to these small, dynamic outfits, even as the general operating support they desperately need is growing scarcer than ever before. By making unrestricted investments in these organizations, we enable them to continue their intrepid programming, enhance their presentation, and pioneer new, unconventional means of sharing new music with a greater community.

Over the last fiscal year, we awarded more than $201,500 in general operating support to 41 New York City-based small ensembles and organizations through our Cary New Music Performance Fund, which supports innovation and excellence in new music programming: presenting, commissioning, recording, and performing music by living composers. The roster of singular organizations currently supported by our New Music Performance Fund includes the New York chapter of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), a longstanding and historic collective of innovative composer-performers dedicated to presenting world premieres of each other’s original works; Mantra Percussion, an ensemble exploring the art of percussion through interdisciplinary collaborations and works that push the boundaries of the classical music concert format; Metropolis Ensemble, a professional chamber orchestra dedicated to making classical music in its most contemporary forms with today’s most outstanding emerging composers and young artists; and Wet Ink, a New York-based ensemble commissioning, promoting, and organizing adventurous American music, while giving composers an open platform for their work that encourages artistic integrity and authenticity.

Most recently, the vital support we provide through the New Music Performance Fund has been made possible by a generous six-year gift from the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust, which closed in 2009. New Music USA is deeply committed to the continuation of the New Music Performance Fund and the support of grassroots new music groups, not just in New York but also throughout the United States. As we reach the end of the Cary Trust funding period, our belief in the vital importance of the grassroots of new music is as fervent as ever. We plan, over the course of the next 18 months, to explore all possibilities for doing everything we can for this sector of the new music world.

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Anna Halprin’s impact on the world of dance is invaluable: she created seminal pieces that changed how many thought of dance; taught now-legendary dancers such as Yvonne Rainer, Trisha Brown, and Meredith Monk; and collaborated with already established ones such as Merce Cunningham. A consistently radical innovator, Halprin influenced and collaborated with many artists, regardless of medium, who defined the 1960s, including The Living Theater, artists associated with the Fluxus movement, Allen Ginsberg, musicians such as The Grateful Dead and Janis Joplin, and composers including Terry Riley, La Monte Young, and Morton Subotnick. Speaking movingly on Halprin’s outsized influence, Shinichi Iova-Koga writes, “Anna is the stone, the rock. This rock drops into the pool and we’re all the little ripples that move out from the impact of the rock on the surface of the water.”

Halprin’s practice was highly oriented towards personal creativity and the exploration of anatomy as a method for informing effective movement.  Rather than dictating every movement, Halprin eventually developed the technique of using scores to create her dances. This working philosophy served her well in expounding on dance as a very self-oriented activity—one that, beyond an artistic discipline, had important resonance for one’s health and psyche.

In 1971, Halprin was diagnosed with a malignant colon tumor, after which she began to explore dance as ritual, a means by which to confront the difficulties and challenges in one’s life. Her artistic methodology strove to use movement to overcome physical and psychic trauma.

Created in celebration of Halprin’s 95th birthday, Iova-Koga’s 95 Rituals is structured around different scores for rituals (performances with a purpose). Iova-Koga considers 95 Rituals “an opportunity to…examine the forces that shaped her. I believe that working with the fundamental principles that Anna has articulated will yield something unlike what Anna has or would make. This piece will be for Anna.”

After 70 preliminary rituals were publicly tested in May and June 2015, all 95 rituals were presented in July at Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco (with Halprin herself in attendance) in performances that were free and open to the public.

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Over the past few years, NewMusicBox has explored issues of serious concern to the field through special theme weeks. This has allowed multiple writers to share their perspectives and provided a platform for wider community dialog. NewMusicBox held two theme weeks in the past year that focused on important aspects of an artist’s life: dealing with money and mental health challenges.

Making It: Music & Money

Following the New Music Gathering in Baltimore last winter, our team was eager to continue and expand on conversations that emerged there about the economic dimensions of being an artist.

“We viscerally understand that one of the salient experiences of being an artist in the United States is the tension between the value we feel in our minds, our hearts, our bones, and the valuation the culture tends to reflect back, negatively, in lack of money. We should all talk about this a lot. Sharing stories is one of the most empowering human acts.” –Ed Harsh

We tried to cover a lot of issues and avoid what could easily become a list of complaints about the difficulties of an artist’s life. We wanted to provide insight and stimulate more ideas. Topics ranged from advice on crowd-sourcing and audience-based commissioning, to strategies for holding “regular jobs” to sustain and work in tandem with artistic practice, to reflections on funding structures and the economic climate for new music in general.

We asked Bonnie Jones to share some of the thoughts she had presented at the New Music Gathering:

“My own path for making a living while making art was something that during the panel I referred to as the Bonnie Jones Grant. This ‘grant’ was all the various web-related freelance and fulltime jobs I’ve held during my 17 years in Baltimore, which directly funded my volunteer non-profit, curatorial work, and art practice. In other words, I had a lot of regular jobs, but I thought of them as very much part of my creative practice because they sustained that practice.… I realized early on that the music and writing I was drawn to might never be able to generate enough income to support my FOOD/SHELTER needs. So I got a job, a job job as artists sometimes call it, or job jobs in my case.”

Mental Health & Musical Creativity

After a blog post by composer Nico Muhly as well as a New York Times article by Keeril Makan about mental health issues and musical creativity, there were many expansive conversations and expressions of solidarity shared within the new music community. We noticed that this was a recurring topic that needed to be further addressed and paid attention to. Our theme week on this topic included a series of interviews and essays during which composers and musicians shared their personal experiences, serving to encourage open dialogue about how mental health issues are dealt with in relation to creative work. The week consisted of contributions by Marcos Balter, Jenny Olivia Johnson, Keeril Makan, Daniel Felsenfeld, and Carolyn O’Brien.

“Everybody thinks they understand depression because they’ve been through a breakup, or they’ve lost someone. But depression is a very specific thing. It’s good that we’re talking about it. … [S]o many composers, or artists, or creative artists generally, have experienced this.” —Daniel Felsenfeld

“Composing, for me, is almost like keeping a diary. I do feel more creative when I am happier. But, funny enough, my works that seem to resonate the most with other people tend to be the ones I’ve created during convoluted personal times. I try not to capitalize on it, not to romanticize depression or anxiety. … But, I’m human, and I have low points, and I do produce during these low points. So, these darker works do happen. I don’t seek them out, but they do happen.” —Marcos Balter

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Published on NewMusicBox – January 22, 2014

Money is a thing seldom discussed in new music journalism, despite the prevailing assumption among large segments of the general public that creating art is a luxury activity. In “The Shame of Poverty and Investing in the Future,” composer Joseph Hallman shares his personal struggles with poverty: growing up as a “functional orphan,” unable to afford basic necessities – let alone musical equipment – Hallman worked tirelessly to refine his craft, seeking to transcend his situation in the pursuit of his dreams. This article, which was shared widely and liked on Facebook close to 400 times just from our original post, ends with the following appeal to the community at large:

It is my hope, first of all, that no one – especially young musicians – should ever face the shame and the self-questioning that poverty could force on them. Young, poor musicians: take heart! Music, and more importantly access to music and music education, is vital to all communities, not just the wealthy. Second, it is my intention that each of us should understand the difficulties faced by impoverished music students. I urge all who are capable to invest in the future via young musicians. There is no reason to expound here on the virtues of music and music education. (That would be preaching to the choir, I know!) But without the support of the many folks who gave me a helping hand, either via donations to local music programs or directly to me for music fees, I would likely not be in the position I am in today. We must come to understand as a field the responsibility each of us bears to determine the best way to support young musicians of diverse socio-economic classes – it need not even be monetary! – and to then make it happen. And thanks to each and every one of you beautiful people who have supported and continue to support young musicians.

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Folk music usually conjures images of banjos, Bob Dylan, and Middle America; computers rarely come to mind.  Yet Dylan went electric, and when NewMusicBox editor Frank J. Oteri chatted with electronic music pioneer Laurie Spiegel in September 2014, she frequently argued that computers are folk instruments just as much as mandolins or washboards.

When Oteri visited Spiegel’s apartment, he found a cavernous Tribeca loft filled with generations of computers and keyboards.  In many ways, her apartment serves as a time capsule for her work, with many eras in the progression of technology displayed in a three-dimensional timeline. Spiegel’s living space tells the story of her life as a revolutionary electronic musician and, more than that, it embodies the history of American technology, allowing visitors to step back in time, briefly, and glimpse how we used to see the future.

A pioneering electronic music artist, Spiegel remains humble in the face of her tremendously prolific output. Her sonic realization of Johannes Kepler’s 1619 text Harmonices Mundi was included on a record sent into space as part of the Voyager mission, and her contemporaries and collaborators include a survey of the experimental Bell Laboratories crew of electronic music composers—Morton Subotnick included. In a perhaps more unusual setting, her piece Sediment was featured in a recent installment of The Hunger Games movie franchise.

Spiegel fell in love with machines the first time she saw a mainframe tape-operated computer at Purdue University while on a field trip with her high school physics class and she has been using them ever since.  That being said, she began her musical life as a folk guitar player and has never abandoned that music. In fact, she sees common ground between the seemingly oppositional aesthetics of folk traditions and the digital realm.

“The electronic model is very similar to the folk model… People will come up with new lyrics for the same melody, or they’ll change it from a ballad to a dance piece. Nobody can remember what the origin is. There is no single creator. … In the way that electronic sounds go around—people sample things, they do remixes or sampling, they borrow snatches of sound from each other’s pieces—the concept of a finite fixed-form piece with an identifiable creator that is property and a medium of exchange or the embodiment of economic value really disappears … in similar ways. … Prior to electronic instruments, you had to go through the bottleneck of written notation. So electronic music did for getting things from the imagination to the ears of an audience what the internet later did for everybody being able to self-publish, democratizing it in ways that obviously have pros and cons.”

Published on NewMusicBox- November 1, 2014

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“The idea is to take the community on an adventure through the creative landscape of contemporary African-American concert music.”

Ranging from neoclassical music to free improvisation, concerto to collaborative, Afrocentric to abstract, The Black Composer Project exhibited the richness of this tradition through an eclectic and exciting festival showcasing three generations-worth of brilliant music by African-American composers and musicians. The program fearlessly delved into and displayed new art music that is “composed and improvised, acoustic and electronic, academic and intuitive,” exploring a wide array of genres and aesthetics through a series of concerts, salons, panels, and discussions throughout Chicago, Illinois.

The Fulcrum Point New Music Project is dedicated to the pioneering and creation of new music that straddles what might be considered new art music and traditional grass-roots music. With support from New Music USA’s project grants, they commissioned composer Jeffery Mumford to write a concerto for piano and ensemble which was premiered at the project’s concluding concert, Proclamation!, at the Promontory. The piece, titled Becoming…, is described as “a virtuosic work for solo piano and ensemble that explores the abstract, sonic expression of the composer’s childhood memories of light, clouds, and atmosphere.” The sold out concert highlighted Fulcrum Point’s approach to presenting a widely varied range of works. This program also included the work of composers Jessie Montgomery and Kahil el’Zabar.

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Published on NewMusicBox – June 24, 2014

When our Chicago Regional Editor, the violinist and writer Ellen McSweeney, got wind that the Beethoven Festival had announced its fourth annual program, she was stunned. She, like many local musicians, had still not been paid for her participation in last year’s festival. In a piece for NewMusicBox that received a record-breaking 10,000 views and close to 2,500 Facebook likes within a day of publication, McSweeney examines the circumstances that allowed this to occur:

For me, the story of the Beethoven Festival is a story of vulnerability: my own individual vulnerability, that of my colleagues, and that of our entire musical community. Much of the most artistically adventurous work in Chicago isn’t unionized, and we take a leap of faith every time we work for each other. Usually, that trust is rewarded, and professional and collaborative bonds are formed that allow us all to thrive. … The community is indeed held together by trust, respect, and not much else. If circumstances like these are kept secret, it threatens the security and well-being of every musician in our city.

But was it the correct choice for us to remain silent, ostensibly to help the festival right itself? …The consequences of our silence go beyond when, or whether, we ever get paid. While we were being nice and patient and quiet, a whole new roster of musicians from throughout the U.S. agreed to play for the 2014 festival. At the very least, the national community should have known that these debts remained unpaid, so that they could have made an informed decision about whether to participate. These individuals, met with the uproar of the past weeks, now face the difficult decision of whether to withdraw.

 

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New Music USA has long provided general operating support for small artist-run new music ensembles in New York City through a grant program that began with our legacy organization, Meet The Composer. The program started with funding from JP Morgan Trust and continued with a grant from the Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust. When the Cary Trust spent out its funds in 2009, it made an important award to New Music USA to continue the grant program through 2015. These grants provided essential support to grassroots ensembles and venues in New York, and many, including ICE and Roulette, have grown beyond this program, gaining wide recognition and support for their consistently innovative and compelling work. In 2014, we awarded the final round of grants provided by the original Cary Trust gift. Recipients had the option to receive their grants over one or two years. See a full list of 2014-2015 awardees in the back of the booklet.

Over the years, this program has become increasingly important as the number of do-it-yourself artist-led ensembles has grown, while the number of programs offering general operating grants to arts organizations in NYC has shrunk. Due to this gap, we were particularly motivated to help small new music groups find new creative ways to sustain their work. We started exploring new paths to sustainability for this sector in collaboration with the New York State Council on the Arts as we administered the first round of a technical assistance program for small new music ensembles in New York State.

Based on the feedback we received during a series of convenings in 2014 with members of the community, in 2015 we ran a pilot version of the program that focused on marketing, promotion, and audience-building strategies. Participating ensembles included Musical Feast, Society for New Music, Ensemble Pamplemousse, Ensemble Mise-En, Astoria Music Society, Yarn/Wire, Loadbang, and Look & Listen. During our meetings with many of these ensembles, we were struck by the powerful desire participants expressed to collaborate with each other across multiple realms—creative, marketing, and administrative.

We took the energy behind that desire for collaboration as our inspiration to build a new program and seek funding for it. This resulted in a $495,000 three-year grant to New Music USA from The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. With this funding, we will implement The NYC New Music Impact Fund, a program that will offer funds for residency pairings and general operations to small DIY new music organizations in New York City, and create a new approach for the collective promotion of the sector through our online platform, newmusicusa.org. We hope to use the NYC New Music Impact Fund as a model for future programs in other cities across the country in the years to come.

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Cosmic revolution; the turning of the universe; aesthetics of molecular crystallizations; Hindu cosmology; phase-shifting patterns and asymmetrical rhythms—these are just some of the phrases used to describe the subject matter of the ethereal and awe-inspiring work for neo-gamelan orchestra and string quartet that The Washington Post describes to be “as cutting edge as cutting edge gets.”

Santa Cruz-based composer Brian Baumbusch worked with an undoubtedly powerful pair: the innovative avant-garde string quartet JACK and the 12-member new gamelan Lightbulb Ensemble (LBE) whom the San Francisco Classical Voice hails for their “refreshingly innovative performances [that] challenge conventional notions of how gamelan music should sound.” With New Music USA’s support, the collaboration between the composer and these two boundary-pushing ensembles made possible the birth of Hydrogen(2)Oxygen, a 30-minute, three-movement work that combines contemporary music, newly created instruments, and American gamelan that premiered at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.

“The music takes on a sense of immense and transcendent grandeur. The JACK players turned in a superb performance of a piece that, so simple on the surface, seems to float over infinite depths. … Bewildering at first, even overpowering, it turned maddeningly beautiful and—to these ears, at least—magnificent, and as intoxicating as a drug.”The Washington Post 

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Not long ago, the composer Gregg Wramage was on a plane from Chicago to Newark, recalling the milestones he had achieved in the past week: a successful first-time collaboration with a great conductor, Renée Baker, and her Chicago Modern Orchestra Project; a powerful and well-received new version of his most popular piece; and a chance to share his love of new music with young and enthusiastic students. Wramage had just participated in the latest iteration of our Music Alive program’s New Partnerships initiative, which cultivates new relationships between emerging composers and orchestras through one-week residencies.

The visit marked the first time that Wramage’s music had ever been performed in Chicago. The piece was a new edition of In Shadows, In Silence – which, according to the composer, is his most popular work – expanded from its original sextet configuration for a 20-piece chamber orchestra. “In the months before I began work on the piece I realized that my memories of earlier periods of my life were most strongly stimulated by shadows and silences,” explains Wramage. “As I started to sketch the work, shadows and silences acted as portals through which I would pass from the world of the present into the world of the past.”

We believe that the bond between orchestras and living composers, though historic, is hardly a thing of the past. The rich history of Music Alive, a program that we co-administer with the League of American Orchestras, showcases how that relationship is constantly evolving; since its inception, the program has supported 127 residencies involving 110 composers and 78 orchestras, with awards totaling $4.1 million. In addition to New Partnerships, Music Alive also has a Principal Residency component, which supports extended, two-year collaborations between composers and orchestras. The most recent of these multi-year awards were made last year. In addition to enabling emergent composers to continue pushing the boundaries of this storied musical format, the program also turns the attention of orchestras towards the living artists within their midst, which is critical to their long-term vitality.

Music Alive is another way for us to help situate composers within communities: in concerts and rehearsals, in public appearances and in the media, and in schools and community spaces. Wramage writes, “I hope that the time Renée and I spent with these young musicians will be of some use to them as they move through their lives, musical and otherwise, and that perhaps the next time I return to Chicago, some of them will be playing in Renée’s orchestra and working with me on my latest piece. For me, that would make this a truly successful residency, and ‘new partnership.’”

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“At North Carolina’s Black Mountain College, erstwhile commune and artistic playground of John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Robert Rauschenberg and many others, a spirit of radical democracy prevailed. Students and teachers shared roles and work, boundaries between disciplines dissolved, and art bled into life, nurturing an atmosphere of unfettered creative collaboration.”

So read the program notes for Black Mountain Songs, a stunning tribute to the twenty-three year existence of the utopian and experimental school of avant-garde multi-disciplinarians—poets, composers, artists, architects and, above all, pedagogues—whose affections for nature, the human body, and the fraught connection between the two created a profoundly organic space for artistic creation.

Black Mountain Songs was an evening-length multimedia affair including staged choral and instrumental music, dance, projection, and visual design that evoked the work of Black Mountain alumni Cy Twombly, Franz Kline, Buckminster Fuller, and others. These multimedia components and the movement of the chorus in various, nontraditional configurations called forth the spirit that permeated Black Mountain.

The Brooklyn Youth Chorus, led by Dianne Berkun-Menaker, partnered with Bryce Dessner (of the rock band The National) and Joseph Melillo (executive producer at BAM) to program a cross-genre concert honoring Black Mountain College featuring music by composers Caroline Shaw, Richard Reed Parry (Arcade Fire), Aleksandra Vrebalov, Nico Muhly, Tim Hecker, Jherek Bischoff, John King, and Dessner himself.

This project, backed by a New Music USA project grant, stands at the peak of a tremendous body of work by the Youth Chorus. Preceded by a week-long residency at the Fisher Center, which included a multitude of activities engaging school and community groups, the work was premiered at BAM’s Harvey Theater in a three-day run starting November 20, 2014.

“The choral songs at the heart of this work are performed with confidence, energy and tenderness (and from memory) by the 50 skilled singers of the Brooklyn Youth Chorus, who are mostly teenagers and mostly girls…The sheer beauty of their singing was captivating.” wrote New York Times critic Anthony Tommasini, who concluded that “it was heartening to see [the group] basking in the standing ovation that ‘Black Mountain Songs’ won from the audience” at BAM Harvey that night, collectively carrying old traditions into the present and richly embodying Black Mountain College’s continuing legacy.

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This Year in Review provides some examples of the work we’ve supported over the past twelve months.  What you don’t see here, however, is the sheer volume of amazing music being created that we simply don’t have the resources to support.  We know that as advocates it’s our role to communicate widely about the breadth, depth, and quality of the work that’s being done across the U.S., to find more support and to expand the resources we distribute to the field, and also to build and even broker relationships between artists and supporters that allow for more funding and support for new music artists, even independently of our programs.

So, back in 2015 we started building New Music Connect: A Network for Friends of New Music, and in 2015-16 we launched a small prototype, with a steering committee of five individuals who are deeply committed to supporting new music all across the U.S. These individuals have provided major financial support but even more importantly, they have helped us design a program that is now ready to launch and expand.

New Music Connect brings together new music patron enthusiasts to learn, exchange ideas, co-mentor, experience, and help build the world of new music in the United States. In addition to creating relationships between donors, a major goal of the network is to link donors with artists, both through additional funds members provide through project grants, but also through other activities that introduce members and artists to each other. Connect has the potential to become a powerful network to help artists do their work as well as address larger issues in our field.

Members of New Music Connect also have the opportunity to view projects that have gone through our panel process and individually support projects they are interested in.  Even in the nascent stage of this program, this has already led to an additional $60,000 being distributed to musicians through project grants that would not have been possible otherwise.

In addition to New Music Connect, in 2015-16 we launched a new program, The NYC New Music Impact Fund, which was funded by a $495,000 grant from The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. (New Music USA is the first music organization to receive a grant from the Rosin Fund.) We built this program to address the needs of a large and important sector of our field: small, artist-led ensembles and venues. Drawing on experiences from New Music USA’s history of support for the sector and on insights gained through multiple meetings we had in the previous year with those active in it, we designed the program to combine support for general operations and residency activity with creative collaborative marketing work on behalf of the sector as a whole.

Though the Impact Fund is initially focused on organizations in New York City, our dream is eventually to extend it to other areas and ideally across the entire country. The first cohort of participants was awarded in June 2016. You can sign up to receive updates about the Impact Fund here.

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The Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble (ECCE) and the Contemporary Portland Orchestra Project (CPOP) have a lot in common: both are community-focused ensembles that were founded by performers and composers under the age of 30, and both have a deep interest in presenting works by living, local composers.

For the past two years, the groups have presented separate programs at Portland’s annual March Music Moderne festival. This year, a New Music USA project grant helped them join forces, bringing together 27 performers from two cities to present a program of work by 15 Oregon-based composers. Strengthening the bonds between new music communities is critical to ensuring the continued vitality of our field: it encourages organizations to share ideas and resources, build audiences, and work together to reach new artistic heights. We were thrilled to see the organizers of this project reaching even further outward at every turn: partnering with the Community Music Center in Portland and building community participation pieces into their programs. “We believe that the strongest lasting connections in music are made by performing together,” they write, “[t]he rehearsals, the concerts, and of course, the celebrations with our audiences after a successful program.”

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The 2012 presidential election and the intense spotlight cast on Republican candidate Mitt Romney’s Mormon background precipitated a “Mormon moment” in the United States. This period of heightened inquiry into the relatively young but fertile religion spurred theologians, historians, and cultural critics to re-examine the denomination in the 21st century. Jeremy Grimshaw, a graduate of Salt Lake City’s Brigham Young University, wrote an article for NewMusicBox in September 2014 which broadly details Mormonism’s many luminary composers and musical ontology.

Grimshaw writes that “music was central to the Mormons’ effort to ‘make the desert blossom as a rose’ during their settlement of Utah and nearby regions in the second half of the 19th century. Stories abound of pioneers taking great pains to transport musical instruments across the plains while leaving so many other belongings behind. (My own family tree includes a great-great uncle, John Grimshaw, a multi-instrumentalist who took a liking to the xylophone but, unable to find or afford one in rural southern Utah, used his perfect pitch to carve one out of wagon wheel spokes.) Converts from abroad were encouraged to bring music with them when they emigrated, and a handful of second- and third-generation Mormons made a reverse trek for conservatory training in Europe or the eastern U.S., several of them at the New England Conservatory. Early efforts at cultural cultivation produced a number of local legends in the early 1900s. Evan Stephens (1854-1930), an early director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, penned dozens of hymns and other works. B. Cecil Gates, a grandson of Brigham Young, composed several choral and orchestral works, including an oratorio on the story of Mormon founder Joseph Smith titled The Restoration and a Christmas cantata, The Shepherd’s Vision.”

Grimshaw finds a particularly rich subject in minimalist pioneer La Monte Young; the composer is the subject of Grimshaw’s book, Draw a Straight Line and Follow It. During their first interview, Young declared: “There’s no question in my mind … principles of Mormonism did play an enormous influential role in the shaping of [me] and [my] music…These concepts of eternity, that souls would be able to reunite, these kinds of concepts were especially intriguing to me. And so there’s no doubt in my mind for even a milli-nothing that they didn’t influence my first work with long-sustained tones and certainly my ideas that things could last for a long time. And sure, I was also gradually becoming acquainted with Eastern thought, but this probably began in the mid-’50s sometime, with reading haiku, and reading the Tao. But it was like something that was an old friend because of the way it had already been introduced to me in Mormonism.”

Published on NewMusicBox- September 24, 2014

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The Oh My Ears (OME) Marathon Concert sprung out of a collective’s mission: community connection through musical engagement; breaking down barriers between audiences, performers, and composers; and fostering opportunities for musicians and teaching artists in the Phoenix metro area of Arizona.

To put this mission into action, New Music USA’s award helped OME present their fourth annual ten-hour marathon of innovative and daring new music by living composers and sound artists, with facilitated activities for audience engagement and interactive projects. The project organizers explained, “Each year, the concert reinforces the belief that the Phoenix metro new music scene is vital and home to supremely talented musical artists.”

This year’s festival featured the Southwest premieres of Michael Gordon’s Timber and Mark Applebaum’s Aphasia, followed by activities like the Epic Maker Instrument Challenge, where participants are invited to design their own instruments with DIY materials, and Musical Maps, which encourages the audience to make visual expressions of their listening experiences with paper and provided art supplies.   

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In addition to our regular editorial staff, NewMusicBox maintains a team of columnists who engage readers in lively discussions of issues facing the field. However, in an effort to keep pace with the myriad ideas and issues vibrating through our field, we have been inviting two new columnists to join us each month this calendar year. So far, these fresh voices have brought a new slate of diverse perspectives to the site, stimulating conversations on new topics and engaging our base while drawing in new readers.

In January, Adam Sliwinski – percussionist, conductor, educator, and member of SO Percussion – contributed widely-shared pieces on creating and nurturing satisfying artistic relationships: “What made them work? Are there general principles that can be applied to the process of collaboration? When and how does a professional relationship transcend the purely transactional?” Framed largely through the lens of his experience with SO, Sliwinski’s posts provide practical advice to performers and composers on how to build momentum together:

We were furiously ambitious to make a career as a chamber group, but there was an incredibly small extant repertoire to draw from. Making deals with our friends to generate new repertoire and seeking out other composers was what we needed to do to survive! We didn’t have Beethoven to fall back on, so we leapt headfirst. … We had to play new pieces as if they were old. Which is to say, as if we needed them to be good in order for our work to matter. The incredible thing is that sending composers the message that their work was essential to our existence drew stunning, visionary results out of many of them. Whether there was commission money involved or not – there has been, as often as possible – our mutual benefit equilibrium was optimum. We needed repertoire as badly as they needed others to be committed to their work.

Monika Herzig, a jazz pianist and educator, came on board for a “Women In Jazz” series in March. In addition to detailing her own experience, her posts gave shine to unsung female trailblazers within the field, and asked tough questions about the “masculine image of jazz, sexual stereotypes of instruments, behavioral and social differences between males and females, and sexual discrimination”:

Once I started looking, I discovered women such as Carla Bley, Jessica Williams, Geri Allen, Joanne Brackeen, Mary Lou Williams, Myra Melford, Regina Carter, Shirley Scott, Melba Liston, and many more with established and blossoming careers. Being part of a group gave me the confidence to proceed: to pursue a doctorate under the tutelage of David Baker at Indiana University; to lead my own groups on more than a dozen recording projects and tours around the world; to write music that received a DownBeat Award and that has been featured in television shows; but most of all to teach the following generations to do the same and get their voices heard. I did not find the stories of my role models in textbooks though; I had to seek them out and ask questions. Why are these trailblazers not included in our history canon?

In collaboration with the New York Philharmonic, we hosted Sean Shepherd, The Phil’s inaugural Kravis Emerging Composer, for coverage of the NY Phil Biennial. “Parsing it all out is also what I’m trying to do for now,” Sean wrote in his first post. “I’ll be going to nearly every event and will be reporting here on what I’m hearing and seeing – and what it all might mean for composers, and even for music, at a juncture such as this.” With the full weight of the Phil’s PR machine behind it, this campaign provided a gateway for new readers into the world of NewMusicBox while briefing our devotees on the happenings of the Biennial:

I was excited by what I heard and saw: some dazzling performances of new repertoire and the galvanized atmosphere of a happening. Professionals from as far as London and Los Angeles popped their heads in and seemed to be enjoying themselves as much as anyone else. Holders of the Biennial Pass (a golden key to every event) began to recognize each other and band together at intermissions and at après-concert events for conversation. Composers both young and not-so were out and about: in droves at the large concerts in Avery Fisher Hall; in trickles for other events. … Still, as exciting as it was this year, the most significant element of the biennial may be already stored away in the attics, waiting for 2016 (or ’18, or ’26) to be fully unpacked. Its potential as a driver and supplier of new projects and new music was (understandably) only just lightly tapped this year, with most pieces being US/NYC premieres as opposed to commissions. And yet, last week amounted to a floodgate of new music being opened: from a few new subscription-series pieces per season from major figures and some encouragement to young talent by way of CONTACT! commissions, the Philharmonic and partners performed well over 60 pieces from composers of all stages and many walks of life.

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At New Music USA, our mission is to serve as advocates for new American music. We do that not only through our grantmaking and media programs, but also as a representative in national and international music networks. New Music USA represents the United States as a member of the International Association of Music Information Centers (IAMIC) and the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), as well as by being one of thirteen members of the Performing Arts Alliance, an organization that brings together nationwide performing arts advocates.

This year, our President and CEO Ed Harsh and Composer Advocate Frank J. Oteri traveled to Wroclaw, Poland, as American representatives at ISCM’s World New Music Days 2014 and IAMIC’s 2014 Annual Meeting, which were timed to coincide and share a number of concerts and activities. Ed and Frank also attended the 24th Annual Underwood New Music Readings in May of 2015, where they participated in the Composer Development Workshop, an insightful set of talks focused on the business of being a composer: Ed participated as a panelist in “Support Structures For Composers,” while Frank moderated the “Publicity and Promotion” workshop.

Earlier in 2015, Frank represented New Music USA at the Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute and attended the February meeting of the American Choral Director’s Association (ACDA), which took place in Salt Lake City, Utah. Additionally, New Music USA was represented by Kevin Clark at this year’s New Music Gathering in San Francisco, California. Frank was also present in Detroit at the 2015 DSO EarShot readings, part of the program developed collaboratively by the American Composers Orchestra, the American Composers Forum, the League of American Orchestras, and New Music USA. This year, he moderated the “Composing An(d) Identity” and “Evolution/Revolution or (R)Evolutionpanels, and was one of two speakers on “Support Structures for Composers.”

Our Director of Grantmaking Programs, Scott Winship, gave a talk called “Resourcing Your Practice” at the 2014 Kresge Art Fellows meeting in Detroit, Michigan, participated as a panelist at the Jazz Connect Conference in January 2015, and in “New Strategies in Grantmaking: Enriching Communities Through the Arts” at the Support Center for Nonprofit Management.

 

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In the late 1960s and early 1970s amidst the growing American experimental music scene, another underground movement was simultaneously emerging called New Communalism. Its activity often went undocumented, as much of it took place in the privacy of intimate artist circles and communes. The experimental artists and researchers in this group were interested in exploring deeper levels of consciousness and pushing the boundaries of music, science, and art. In her article published on NewMusicBox, Kerry O’Brien provided a deep look into the movement via an exploration of the group Pulsa and documentation of the experiments and performances they held at their loft space and commune, Harmony Ranch, in rural Connecticut. There they hosted such legends as La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, and many others.

“In working with wave energies, part of Pulsa’s work dealt with often invisible or inaudible materials like heat, sound, and light. For instance, in early 1970, Pulsa held an installation in New York City at the MoMA’s Outdoor Sculpture garden. … [The work] aimed to gather ‘environmental information,’ including sound, light movement, and heat using microphones, infrared sensors, and photocells. They then fed that information back into the garden using strobe lights, infrared heaters, and loudspeakers.”

Pulsa’s intent was to develop technology for controlling perceptible wave energies and to create artworks based on and in dialogue with their research. Their ideas were concerned with the theme of interconnectivity and community—a sentiment that the group not only worked with in their art, but ardently practiced as a lifestyle

“Pulsa created art and music that not only made group collaborations audible and palpable, but they also reminded their audiences and participants—through light and sound—that actions have effects. … Pulsa’s work attested to the myriad ways that human beings are entangled­­—with each other and with environments—and you can hear this involvement; you can hear community through sound.”

 

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“I composed Jim Crow’s Tears to encourage people to reflect on the tragic times in our history in order to learn from them,” writes Detroit-based jazz trumpeter Kris Johnson. “I also want[ed] to pay tribute to those who endured dark periods in our nation[’s past] and fought to implement change,” he continues. “We will not advance unless we study our history.”

Jim Crow’s Tears shares a story that needs telling. Through the story of one man, the musical sheds light on the context surrounding blackface minstrelsy, the conditions that gave rise to it, and the enduring mark it has left upon our collective conscious. Composed and written by Johnson with the help of a book by Gary Anderson of Detroit’s Plowshares Theater, the work features six ensemble members, an eleven-piece jazz ensemble, and an eight-piece chamber orchestra.

The musical had its premiere in April 2013 at Art-X Detroit, a free concert series presented by the Kresge Arts Experience. This year, New Music USA provided support to ensure that this important work was documented on a high-quality audio recording. The album version will be released to the public and used to secure further performance opportunities, allowing the piece to continue to inspire audiences to interrogate our shared past.

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In Re-Scoring History, producer/artistic director Don DiNicola and composer Renee Baker assert that the 1925 film Body and Soul, which is often written off as an outdated “race film,” delivers a potent and complex message, making it both morally relevant and artistically compelling for viewers in 2015. With support from a New Music USA project grant, Baker wrote a new score for the film, which was directed and written by the groundbreaking Oscar Micheaux and starred the legendary Paul Robeson. Evocative and polished, her score adds depth to the characters, brings to the fore the film’s implicit social commentary, and makes the issues which are still important relatable to contemporary audiences.

Painter Lewis Achenbach wrote warmly of the film’s April 26, 2015 screening and performance at Chicago’s Museum for Contemporary Art, noting that “the score somehow created a wormhole and fused 1925 and 2015 […] The sound and vision was crisp and seamless, the score abstractly holding slightly behind the subject matter, yet portending and nudging like a ripple somehow.”

Crafting a score that fit Micheaux’s direct and unsentimental film was no easy task. “This film is especially important,” DiNicola and Baker emphasize, “[as] the narrative doesn’t rely solely on correcting racial stereotypes of the times. It delivers its message with a complex moral tinge that was frank and honest to the point where even the African-American audience was shocked to see a preacher portrayed in such a morally ambiguous light.”

In his work as a director, Micheaux pushed back against white stereotyping of the time by crafting complex black characters across the social spectrum. The film marks the debut of singer, actor, and activist Paul Robeson. He played a runaway prisoner masquerading as Rt. Reverend Isaiah T. Jenkins, a purported man of God, who throughout the film’s progression, steals, rapes, and kills. For a black filmmaker working in the 1920s, including a black character behaving in such a way was a daring move. Elaborating on what is already a complicated work, Baker’s music weaves an added sonorous dimension, such that “the music doesn’t just accompany the film, it embodies the narrative voice, speaks for the characters, and underscores the drama.”

Revisiting Micheaux’s film with a contemporary perspective, DiNicola and Baker give Body and Soul the respect and consideration that it deserves. “Oscar Micheaux was a pioneering filmmaker whose reputation deserves rescuing from the ‘race film’ categorization. This treatment of Body and Soul endeavors to change the dialogue and place Body and Soul squarely where it belongs, as a salient work of art and social commentary in the context of the early silent film era.”

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The rich and multi-faceted mind of Hannibal Lokumbe has powerfully expressed the African-American experience through music, community activism, and poetry for over four decades. He identifies his new piece, One Land, One River, One People, with a term he coined himself, “spiritorio.” This points to the nature of the work’s libretto and choir elements, the influences from blues, jazz, and spirituals, and its intent on speaking to the universality of human struggle, injustice, and—ultimately—spirituality.

Following the premiere of the piece at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center (SPAC) in August, New Music USA’s grant support allowed Hannibal to conduct a number of community outreach activities to “inspire others through the composer’s message of hope and healing through music.” The community activities around the Capital Region of New York engaged diverse groups that ranged from prison inmates to African-American congregations, and were designed to “address the societal and cultural concepts of [Hannibal’s] work, as well as the transformative power of art.”

All the beings of the world will one day come to see the truth of their nature. And the lies of ignorance, fear, and hatred will be gone from them and all that they do. Their minds will recall the cosmic womb from which it came and death will be known for the gift that it is. And grace will at last become their wealth and peace will become the ruler of the land. And this peace will hold them like a child holds a bowl full of all that it needs to grow in mind, flesh, and spirit. Then nations will fly the flag of One Land, and the pain of being, will be no more.” —Hannibal Lokumbe

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Over the past year, NewMusicBox has been a leading contributor to a passionate dialog about music, gender, and creative careers, inviting columnists, composers, and our readership to voice their thoughts on the matter through columns and comments. The composer Alex Temple picked up that thread in “I’m A Trans Composer: What The Hell Does That Mean,” offering insight on “what it’s like to be a composer on the trans-female spectrum in the early 21st century.” We reposted that piece on NewMusicBox, which led to an even further flurry of conversation on social media platforms.

Life experience, social conditioning, and biology can all affect a composer’s music, but those things vary enormously among men as a group and among women as a group, and how people react to them artistically is idiosyncratic and unpredictable. … That said, I have noticed that certain specific attitudes toward music seem to correlate with gender. In particular, it seems like nearly every composer-performer whose work depends on an intense, profound, almost mystical relationship with the artist’s own body is a woman; and nearly every composer who sees music as a purely abstract, formalist construction, free of emotional, social, psychological, or political meaning, is a man. Given how our society is put together, the existence of those correlations shouldn’t come as a surprise. But I don’t feel any connection with either of those points of view, and my own approach to music, which has to do with cultural history and the fuzzy boundary between humor and horror, doesn’t seem to be a particularly gendered one.

While I don’t think of my work as specifically female, I do think of it as specifically genderqueer. Just as I often feel like I’m standing outside the world of gendered meanings, aware of them but never seeing them as inevitable natural facts like so many humans seem to do, I also tend to feel like I’m standing outside the world of artistic meanings. The discourse surrounding music tends to take certain value judgments for granted, although
the value judgments vary with the musical style being discussed: complexity is better than simplicity, or emotional expression is better than cerebral formalism, or change is better than repetition, or raw authenticity is better than glitzy artifice, or whatever. But when I look at the world of music, I see an elaborate, sometimes gloriously absurd game, in which all of those rules are arbitrary conventions.

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In an ethnomusicological overview of the banjo, its practitioners, and musical legacy written for NewMusicBox, composer Erik Spangler grapples with the contentious history this beloved instrument carries.  Spangler hears echoes of American life dating back to the 19th century in the banjo—the pain and suffering undergone by African Americans and white Americans alike. Navigating what W.E.B. du Bois called “the color line” throughout the article, Spangler ends on a note of hope—that the banjo, inextricable from a history of racism, stereotyping, and injustice in the United States, can provide us with a means for healing and connection and lead us forward to a place of respect and solidarity.

“Is there an instrument that comes with more cultural baggage than the banjo? For many, it evokes a stereotyped image of the rural white Southerner, as in the scary hillbillies of Deliverance and many a comedy sketch. In the 19th century, by contrast, the banjo served as a caricature of enslaved Africans, gaining wide popularity through blackface minstrel shows. The instrument’s deeper story moves around and between the stereotypes. This is a timbre that cuts to some of the deepest seams of America’s past.”

“…I am drawn to the banjo as a means of grounding creative experimentation within a deep history that is relevant to connections that I am trying to make in my music. The legacy of slavery in the United States is one which is pushed fairly far back in our collective consciousness. The trauma of that institution still reverberates today in our economic structure, systems of social control, and self-segregation within our population. The banjo came into its own as an American instrument in the midst of that experience of slavery. It was brought into the white mainstream consciousness through the blackface minstrel show, a format which also continues to reverberate in mainstream American entertainment. In the process of this African instrument being adopted by popular society in America, it also took on the musical heritage of the English, Scottish, and Irish immigrants. It was embraced as an instrument of the Everyman, especially in the hollers and mining towns of Appalachia, where the banjo became a main outlet for expressing life’s troubles as well as a way of laying them aside through homespun entertainment.”

“…The hybrid cultural heritage of the banjo, kept alive by traditional players and continually reinterpreted by musicians from many different backgrounds, may be uniquely equipped to break through the divisions that separate people. It is an instrument that was originally embedded in the lives of enslaved Africans as well as the rural white settlers later on, and it has assimilated musical elements from both cultures. The tangled thread of minstrelsy that endures in popular media to this day is one that needs to be examined and understood in all of its complexity. Artists and musicians should attempt to examine that shadow and address it in a conscious way in contemporary art. The banjo stands squarely at the intersection of Anglo and African cultures at a formative period in American history, spanning different conceptions of heritage. Perhaps it can also be a tool to help to unravel the pain or prejudice and uplift us to better way of coexisting and collaborating in this world.”

 

Published on NewMusicBox- December 10, 2014

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New Music USA serves as advocates—and not just in the traditional sense of the word.  We view our grantmaking and online content as advocacy for the new music field, as well as all of our work to build a community that includes all participants—creators, appreciators, and supporters—and then connects them to each other.

We also engage in activities that are very specifically focused on advocating for American composers and their work. For example, New Music USA is a governing member of the International Association of Music Information Centers (IAMIC). President and CEO Ed Harsh serves as vice-president and Composer Advocate Frank J. Oteri serves as the chair of the Communications Group.  Ed attended two meetings of IAMIC in Europe this past year, working to build international networks for the advancement of new American music.

New Music USA also represents the United States in the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), where Frank was elected to the Executive Committee this year.  Frank traveled to Ljubljana, Slovenia, in September for ISCM’s 2015 World Music Days, and Tongyeong, South Korea, for ISCM’s 2016 World Music Days.  Frank also helped secure funding for Missy Mazzoli, whose work was nominated by New Music USA and then chosen to be performed at the 2016 World Music Days, to attend the festival.

Nationally, New Music USA is one of 13 national members of the Performing Arts Alliance (PAA), an organization for performing arts advocates. Ed also attended quarterly meetings of New York Grantmakers in the Arts and the national conference of Grantmakers in the Arts in LA in October.

Frank gave a presentation to composers participating in the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Edward T. Cone Composition Institute in July.  He also attended the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra Composer Institute in November and moderated a roundtable panel of composers and orchestra administrators.  Frank attended the Chamber Music America Annual Conference (serving as a mentor for a group of first-time attendees), served on the faculty of the Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute, and moderated two panels as a part of the American Composers Orchestra’s Underwood and Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute Readings and Workshop: “The Real Path to Programming” and “Publicity and Promotion.”  Scott Winship, our director of grantmaking programs, gave a presentation called “Support Structures for Composers” at this gathering, as well.  Scott also participated on a Grant Resources for Jazz panel at the 2016 Jazz Education Network in Louisville, Kentucky.

New Music USA’s grantmaking staff attended and led an interactive session at this year’s League of American Orchestras’ conference titled “Leveraging Creative Connections.”  Additionally, Ed and three other staff members attended the second New Music Gathering, which took place in Baltimore in January. Director of Platform Kevin Clark gave a presentation on economics and long-term planning for artists.

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When Two x Four – a project of violinists Jennifer Koh and Jaime Laredo in collaboration with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the IRIS Orchestra, and the Curtis Institute – commissioned composer Anna Clyne to write a companion piece to Bach’s Concerto in D minor for Two Violins, Clyne focused her attention on lineage. Specifically, the composer was captivated by the relationship between the two violinists; Laredo has been a mentor to Koh since she began studying with him at the Curtis Institute.

The resulting work, titled Prince of Clouds, is a Baroque-style tour de force centered on exchanges between the two soloists. The Chicago Tribune describes Koh and Laredo “trading and meshing phrases like champion relay runners…it’s the first concerto [Clyne has] ever composed, and it’s a winner.”

Once the West Coast premiere concert was scheduled, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra reached out to us to enable them to bring Clyne to town for a series of outreach events. These kinds of activities continue to be a vital component of our work, along with other support available through our project grants. As a result of this support, the composer was able to make key contributions to pre-concert discussions, give an interview to the Los Angeles Times, and host an intensive education program with students in the LACO’s Meet the Music program. 700 of those students were also given a sneak peak of the performance prior to the premiere, and 100 students from local youth music programs received complimentary tickets to the show.

Clyne’s presence also helped to make the West Coast premiere a smashing success. Donna Perlmutter of the LA Observer praised the “wondrous new piece,” while Mark Swed of the Los Angeles Times remarked, “It is lovely music, slightly too lovely and thus interrupted by harshness. Brutal, raspy percussive interludes appear suddenly, like slashes of the knife on the music, but sweet melody always returns, swooping with ever more determination. There is never resolution. Balance is gained, lost and regained, never maintained.”

“A Love Like That”- A New Work for Cantus and High School Choir
Minneapolis, MN

“Heaven’s Dust” – World Premiere by Randy James for 10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

“THE LONG WALK” WORLD PREMIERE
Saratoga Springs, NY

2015 Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival
Becket, MA

2015 New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival
New York, NY

2015 Ojai Music Festival
Ojai, CA

3 Singers
Chicago, IL

95 RITUALS (for Anna Halprin)
San Francisco, CA

A Cappella
New Brunswick, NJ

A Debut CD: The Music of Eric Nathan
Williamstown, MA

A new work for flute and electronics written for flutist Carla Rees
Denton, TX

A Piano Party for Terry Riley at 80
Berkeley, CA

After The Feast
New York City, NY

Along These Lines
San Francisco, CA

Alternative Guitar Summit
New York, NY

American Composers Orchestra Premieres Motormouth for Chamber Orchestra at Carnegie Hall
Los Angeles, CA

American Notes– Engaging new communities
New York, NY

ANATOMY THEATER
New York, NY

ASO Sound Investment Composer Residency with Paul Desenne
Birmingham, AL

Babbling
San Francisco, CA

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Presents Ten Centennial Celebration Commissions
Baltimore, MD

beaufort scales
Chicago, IL

Beirut Is A House Of Many Names
Muskegon, MI

Black Mountain Songs
Brooklyn , NY

BOSIE
Ann Arbor, MI

Brass Band Blastoff
New York, NY

Breath and Beat
Montclair, NJ

Call & Response 2016
San Francisco, CA

Capriccio
Boston, MA

CAUGHT IN TREETOPS
Austin, TX

Cello Solos Today
New York, NY

Choreographing LeWitt
Brooklyn , NY

Chromatic
New York, NY

Coffee County Tennessee
Austin, TX

Commercial Recording Featuring Solo Piano Works By Timo Andres and Phil Young
Chapel Hill, NC

Contemporaneous presents Self-Portrait, a Fifth Anniversary Celebration
New York , NY

Conversations with Sculptures
Hamilton, NJ

Don’t Look Back
Boston, MA

Dual-national collaboration between Cuatro Puntos and Afghanistan National Institute of Music to record Gullistan-e Nur by Dr. Sadie Harrison
Hartford, CT

Duo Damiana Debut Recording: Adventurous Repertoire for Flute and Guitar
Eugene, OR

Edgefest 2015: Wake Up Calls from the Edge
Ann Arbor, MI

Edmar Castaneda Performance and “Meet the Artist” Event
District of Columbia, DC

ESTHER
Brooklyn, NJ

Face Resection
Culver City, CA

Falling for Prepositions
Teaneck, NJ

Featured Composer Residency with Derek Bermel
San Francisco, CA

flux-mirror for saxophone and electronics
Minneapolis, MN

George Lewis: Afterword, The AACM (as) Opera + International Contemporary Ensemble
Brooklyn, NY

Girl Gods
Seattle, WA

Intimate Instruments Workshop: Building the Linguaphone of Tremulous Communion
Detroit, MI

Iron Shoes
Oakland, CA

Kettle Corn New Music 2014-15: Sandbox Percussion and Lisa Moore
New York, NY

Lisa Renée Coons in Residence at 2015 Women Composers Festival of Hartford
Hartford, CT

Luminous Etudes: Visions of the Black Madonna of Montserrat
Fullerton, CA

Man Forever with TIGUE – Percussion and Vocal Canons
Ridgewood, NY

Matana Roberts: COIN COIN
New York, NY

Meehan/ Perkins Duo Records New American Percussion Works
Chicago, IL

Metafagote
New York, NY

Music Creates and Destroys
Jersey City, NJ

Native American Composer Apprentice Project (NACAP)
Various, AZ

New Work for Avi Avital
New York, NY

New Works for the OpenICE Initiative
New York, NY

No Capacity to Consent
Washington, DC

Old Text Woven New
Baltimore, MD

Omaha Under the Radar 2015
Omaha, NE

Organon Novus: Contemporary Organ Works by American Masters
Chicago, IL

Paradigm Lost
Philadephia, PA

PATIENT(CE)
New York, NY

Pikes Falls Chamber Music Festival: Year 4
Jamaica, VT

Quartet Project sampler
Boston, MA

Qubit Presents SoundArt2016
New York, NY

Radiant Child Video Recording
Chicago, IL

Record Original Jazz/Classical Works for Piano
Roslyn, WA

Recording “Letting Time Circle Through Us”
Cambridge, MA

Re-scoring History
Chicago, IL

Resist/Surrender
San Francisco, CA

RighteousGIRLS
New York, NY

Roomful of Teeth 2015 MASS MoCA Residency
North Adams, MA

Rounder Songs
Pittsburgh, PA

Ruptured Horizon
New York, NY

Same Animal, Different Cages
Brooklyn, NY

SaxoVoce
Cleveland, OH

Second Inversion – Rethink Classical
Seattle, WA

Sher Flash: Fiction Becomes New Music
Austin, TX

Short opera for soprano and baritone
Duluth, MN

Smoke Lines.
Jersey City, NJ

SOLI : Experience
San Antonio, TX

Sonambient Pavilion
Chicago, IL

Song of Silver Geese
Brooklyn, NY

SOUNDIAL
Chapel Hill, NC

Sowah Mensah Commission
New Prague, Northfield, Faribault, Cannon Falls, MN

STEVE COLEMAN: SYNOVIAL JOINTS RECORDING PROJECT
Brooklyn , PA

string quartet and skyscraper
Manhattan, NY

Supporting Student Composers
Randolph, VT

Sympathetic Magic
Helena, MT

Synth Nights: Morton Subotnick
New York, NY

Talujon’s Pocket Gamelan
Brooklyn , NY

The Black Composer Speaks
Chicago, IL

The Black Rose
New York, NY

The Brain Piece
New York, NY

The Debut Series Expanded: Mentorship, Marketing, and Musical Incubation
New York, NY

The Magnetosphere
Austin, TX

The Monadnock Institute at The Walden School
Dublin, NH

The Snow Falls in the Winter
New York, NY

Tonecycle for Blues (2014) Base 30 Hz, 2:3:7 Vocal Version with 3:4 and 6:7
New York, NY

TRAFFIC JAM
Austin, TX

Two Commissions for Arturo O’Farrill
New York, NY

Undine
Los Angeles, CA

Walk to the Beat
Nyack , NY

WALKING WITH ‘TRANE
Brooklyn, NY

Water, Water, Everywhere
Fresno, CA

WAVES
NY and NJ

Wild Rumpus: In Time
San Francisco, CA

Written in Water
Minneapolis, MN

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An article published on NewMusicBox by musicologist Will Robin took a retrospective look at Bang on a Can’s history, legacy, and the community it built for American contemporary music.

About 30 years ago at the very first Bang on a Can marathon, Milton Babbitt’s Vision and Prayer was scheduled next to Steve Reich’s Four Organs. Before introducing his piece Babbitt joked, “Sorry I got here late, but I got lost—I’ve never been this far downtown before.”

Upon first arriving to New York, Bang on a Can founders—David Lang, Michael Gordon, and Julia Wolfe—noticed a stark contrast of musical communities and aesthetics: “Uptown” and “Downtown”. The philosophies or schools of thought were vastly different, and to the three young composers, this very contrast was the breeding ground for envisioning a new reality for American music.

“Wolfe titled her dissertation ‘Embracing the Clash,’ and that early ‘clash’ became an all-encompassing metaphor for Bang on a Can, extending out into its programming of non-Western music, rock, and free improvisation…. The Reich/Babbitt juxtaposition, though, wasn’t only about clashing. It was about resolution: imagining a new kind of new music community, one that would bring together two disparate scenes.”

The three composers’ initial vision of a musical community defined by a boundary-breaking, genre-bending, and “embracing the clash” postmodern mentality gave birth to the present day Bang on a Can—a now multifaceted umbrella organization that sponsors marathon concerts, a touring ensemble, record label, marching band, institute, and commissioning fund. Their dream to reimagine possibilities and create a sense of community within the plurality of differences that comprise the American music scene became a reality.

“Stepping past ideologies, placing oneself not only not within an uptown or downtown camp, but also beyond any squabbles between them, became a core mythos of Bang on a Can… [their] ideology is that of, as its website declares, ‘building a world in which powerful new musical ideas flow freely across all genres and borders.’”

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Published on NewMusicBox – April 1, 2014

Many revere Juan Orrego-Salas as the greatest living Chilean-born composer. However, the nonagenarian took up residence in the United States before most of us were born, and his work reflects that duality. Orrego-Salas has also been a tireless advocate for other composers and was the founder of the Latin American Music Center.

At 95, Orrego-Salas is the oldest person we have ever interviewed for NewMusicBox. “We constantly get to people at the beginning of careers and also at the midcareer stage,” remarks Frank J. Oteri, NewMusicBox’s senior editor. “Here’s someone who has stopped composing…this was the first person we interviewed who was able to reflect on a complete body of work.

The Cover Profile focuses on the composer’s life and work, his move to the United States and the foundation of the Latin American Music Center, and a few incredible (and hilarious) stories of his interactions with Aaron Copland, who was his teacher:

Aaron Copland was waiting for me in the station where you come from New York to Tanglewood. And he had reserved for me a room and so on. It was very nice to see him again. And he said to me, ‘Well, I’ll tell you, this afternoon you have a rehearsal of your Sextet. But I’ll have to pull your ears because you did a very naughty thing with the Sextet.’ What did I do? I was very frightened, you know. ‘You end pianissimo. You should never end pianissimo a work at your age because you need applause, and they never applaud pianissimo endings.’ ‘Well I’m sorry, because it’s written already.’ Okay, he sat with me at the premiere, and when it ended, there was a big applause. I said, ‘I am sorry. You are right, and I’m wrong.’

When I saw Aaron Copland for the last time, it was here. Sitting here. Perhaps in this chair. He had one of my granddaughters sitting in his lap. And I asked him suddenly, ‘Aaron, what are you writing?’ He looked. ‘Nothing. I’ve written all what I had to write.’ And that said a great thing for me. I know that Aaron had written everything that he had to write. And I was starting to feel that I had written also what I had to write. I had nothing more to say in music.

 

10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

Afro Latin Jazz Alliance
New York, NY

Alabama Symphony Orchestra
Birmingham, AL

Richard Aldag
San Francisco, CA

Anna de la Paz
Nyack, NY

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Baltimore, MD

Matt Barbier
Culver City, CA

Molly Barth
Eugene, OR

Beth Morrison Projects
New York, NY

Brooklyn Youth Chorus
Brooklyn, NY

Sarah Cahill
Berkeley, CA

Cantus
Minneapolis, MN

Carolyn Dorfman Dance
NJ

Chicago Youth Symphony Orchestras
Chicago, IL

Jung Hee Choi
New York, NY

Classical KING FM 98.1 / Second Inversion
Seattle, WA

Steve Coleman
Allentown, PA

John Colpitts
Ridgewood, NY

Company Stefanie Batten Bland
New York, NY

Contemporaneous
New York, NY

Cuatro Puntos
Hartford, CT

Danmari – Yass Hakoshima Movement Theatre
Montclair, NJ

DC Jazz Festival
Washington, DC

Amanda DeBoer
Omaha, NE

Diagenesis Duo
Helena, MT

Don DiNicola
New York, NY

Bill Doerrfeld
WA

DRIGGproductions

Experimental Sound Studio
Chicago, IL

Fast Forward Austin
Austin, TX

Festival of New Trumpet Music
New York, NY

David First
Brooklyn, NY

Flyaway Productions
San Francisco, CA

Freespace Dance
Monclair, NJ

Fulcrum Point New Music Project
Chicago, IL

Ellen Fullman
Berkeley, CA

Jeremy Gill
Boston, MA

Grand Canyon Music Festival
Grand Canyon, AZ

Pat Graney

Chris Gross
New York, NY

Randall Harlow

Joel Harrison
Brooklyn, NY

Sungji Hong
Denton, TX

Hybrid Vigor Music, Inc.
Amherst, MA

Ryan Ingebritsen
Chicago, IL

International Contemporary Ensemble
New York, NY

Shinichi Iova-Koga
San Francisco, CA

Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival
Becket, MA

Jody Oberfelder Projects
New York, NY

Jenny Olivia Johnson
Cambridge, MA

Molly Joyce
New York, NY

Kerrytown Concert House
Ann Arbor, MI

Kettle Corn New Music
NY

Kitka, Inc.
Oakland, CA

Bernd Klug
Brooklyn, NY

Sam Krahn
Minneapolis, MN

Lake Superior Chamber Orchestra
Duluth, MN

Lar Lubovitch Dance Company
New York, NY

Felipe Lara
New York, NY

Abigail Levine
Brooklyn, NY

Susanna Loewy
Philadelphia, PA

Lunar Ensemble
Baltimore, MD

Lustig Dance Theatre
New Brunswick, NJ

Pamela Madsen
Laguna Beach, CA

Keeril Makan
Cambridge, MA

Martha Graham Dance Company
New York, NY

A.J. McCaffrey
Los Angeles, CA

Meehan/ Perkins Duo
Chicago, IL

Tiffany Mills
Brooklyn, NY

Tim Munro
Chicago, IL

Music-COMP (Music Composition Online Mentoring Program)
Essex Junction, VT

Eric Nathan
Williamstown, MA

New Century Chamber Orchestra
San Francisco, CA

New York City Electroacoustic Music Festival
New York, NY

Nimbus Dance Works
Jersey City, NJ

Northfield Youth Choirs
MN

Ogni Suono Saxophone Duo
Cleveland, OH

Ojai Music Festival
Ojai, CA

Opera Saratoga
Saratoga Springs, NY

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
New York, NY

Steve Parker
Austin, TX

Emily Pinkerton
Pittsburgh, PA

Russell Podgorsek
Austin, TX

Claire Porter

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
New York City, NY and Philadelphia, PA

Qubit
New York, NY

Ragamala Dance
Minneapolis, MN

Chris Reilly
Ann Arbor, MI

RighteousGIRLS
New York, NY

Risa Jaroslow & Dancers
San Francisco Bay Area, CA

Roomful of Teeth

Roulette Intermedium, Inc.
Brooklyn, NY

Seán Curran Company
New York, NY

Shua Group
Jersey City, NJ

Jen Shyu
New York City, NY

SOLI Chamber Ensemble
San Antonio, TX

Anna Sperber
Brooklyn, NY

Splinter Reeds
San Francisco, CA

Matthew Steinke
Austin, TX

Susan Marhsall & Company
New York, NY

Mat Sweeney
Los Angeles, CA

Talujon
New York, NY

The Block
Muskegon, MI

The Jazz Gallery
New York, NY

The Kitchen
New York, NY

The Walden School
Dublin, NH

Third Practice
Washington, DC

Urban Bush Women
Brooklyn, NY

Lee Weisert
Chapel Hill, NC

Wild Rumpus
San Francisco, CA

Women Composers Festival of Hartford
Hartford, CT

Clara Yang
Chapel Hill, NC

Youth Orchestras of Fresno
Fresno, CA

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American composer and beloved new music advocate John Duffy, who founded Meet The Composer in 1974, died on December 22, 2015, after a long illness. He was 89.

In 2011, Meet The Composer and the American Music Center merged to form New Music USA. On NewMusicBox, Ed Harsh, current president and CEO, reflected on John Duffy’s life and profound impact on the field.

“With John Duffy, everything was possible. He radiated an optimism as forthright and clear as it was free of guile and self-importance. Though the limits of observable reality might be challenged, audacity never distracted from core purpose. His optimism happily went about its business. It lived solidly on terra firma. It got things done.”

Ed discussed how Duffy often saw the world in a way that was far ahead of his time:

“[His] omnivorous openness was paired with a healthy disregard for conventional hierarchies. He didn’t recognize them as valid, so he ignored them. For John, the idea that a “classical” symphonic work was, by nature, automatically worthy of higher status than the work of, say, Ornette Coleman or Burt Bacharach—to use two of his favorite examples—was simply bunk. He was quick to fight the ingrained privilege and prejudice that often hide behind those hierarchies. The energy and self-assuredness he brought to such spirited struggles embodied for me a muscular, practical, American blue-collar view of the value inherent in solidly workmanlike effort, no matter its form.”

“The exploding variety of creativity we’re blessed with in 2015, which blows through genre categories like so much thin air, may obscure for us now the uncommon character of his views. It’s worth pausing for a moment to make sure that we don’t take John’s openness for granted. Because we shouldn’t.”

Further, the combination of his ahead-of-the-times view with his optimism led Duffy to found an organization that was radical in its day and to continue to fight when others thought what he was trying to do was impossible or foolish.

“John embodied faith, broadly defined; faith in himself and in his fellow artists. This is the fuel that powered his will. And what a will it was, able to conjure abstract vision into very real being. For years in the late 1970s and early 1980s he enthusiastically regaled anyone who would listen with his idea for putting composers in residence with orchestras around the country. We can only imagine how many dozens (hundreds?) of indulgent smiles or blank stares he had to suffer. What an improbable idea it was for a little nonprofit with a tiny budget…. By 1992—ten years, several million dollars, and one transformed orchestral new music world later—it wasn’t improbable anymore. It was obvious.”

“That was a big victory, but it wasn’t the only one. There was also the MTC commissioning program, the composer-choreographer program, the New Residencies program. So many new realities conjured, to the benefit of so many. Yes, that’s the thing: to the benefit of so many.”

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At New Music USA, our mission is to serve as advocates for new American music. We do that not only through our grantmaking and media programs, but also as a representative in national and international music networks. New Music USA represents the United States as a member of the International Association of Music Information Centers (IAMIC) and the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), and is one of 13 members of the Performing Arts Alliance, which brings together nationwide performing arts advocates.

This year, our President and CEO Ed Harsh and Composer Advocate Frank J. Oteri traveled to Europe to the ISCM’s World New Music Days 2013 and IAMIC’s 2013 Annual Meeting as American representatives. Ed also attended IAMIC’s Winter Meeting in 2014. Additionally, both Ed and Frank participated in administering EarShot, a program developed collaboratively by the American Composers Orchestra, the American Composers Forum, League of American Orchestras, and New Music USA. EarShot helps orchestras around the country to identify and support promising composers in the early stages of their careers. Frank represented New Music USA at the EarShot readings in Detroit, while Ed gave a professional development presentation on “Support Structures for Composers” as part of the “Earshot Under Construction” program in Berkeley. Both Ed and Frank were panelists for the American Composers Orchestra’s Underwood New Music Readings, while Director of Grantmaking Programs Scott Winship served on the 2014 MATA Festival’s “Business of Being a Composer” panel. Ed also attended the PAA board meeting in New Orleans, which included a public session with local artists focusing on their potential power as advocates for the arts at all levels of government: local, state, and national.

In collaboration with the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), New Music USA organized three meetings of small new music ensembles and arts organizations based in New York state. Held in New York City and Syracuse, these convenings fostered interconnectivity and dialogue between the organizations while providing them with the opportunity to voice their needs to the organizers. Our goal is to gather results from these meetings and use them to design and implement a technical assistance project, which will address the needs of small new music ensembles and organizations.

Samuel Adams
Oakland, CA

Julia Adolphe

Andy Akiho
New York, NY

Ambrose Akinmusire
Los Angeles, CA

Albany Records

Joseph Alessi

Elizabeth Alexander

Vicente Alexim
New York, NY

Andy Algire

Dewa Alit

American Composers Orchestra
New York, NY

American Lyric Theater (ALT)
New York, NY

Jeff Anderle
San Francisco, CA

Matthew Andreini

Timo Andres
Brooklyn, NY

Austin New Music Co-op
Austin, TX

Austin SoundWaves
Austin, TX

Austrian Cultural Forum New York
New York, NY

Avi Avital

Dr. Allan Ballinger
East Windsor, CT

Stacey Barelos
Omaha, NE

Ashley Bathgate
New York City, NY

Holly Batt

Jeremy Howard Beck
Floral Park, NY

Michael Begay

Daniel Belcher

Robert Benford

Marla Berg

Derek Bermel

Tim Berne

Ranjit Bhatnagar
Brooklyn, NY

Kevin Bishop
Hartford, CT

Holly Bishop
Hartford, CT

Wojtek Blecharz
San Diego, CA

Olivia Block
Chicago, IL

Per Bloland
Oxford, OH

Suzanne Bocanegra

John Boesche
Chicago, IL

Benjamin Boone
Fresno, CA

Charlotte Bray
Berlin, Germany

Leigh Breslau
Chicago, IL

BRIC
Brooklyn, NY

Nick Brooke
Bennington, VT

Brooklyn Rider
Brooklyn, NY

Courtney Brown

Amiya Brown
Santa Fe, NM

Kyle Bruckmann
Oakland, CA

Douglas Buchanan
Cockeysville, MD

Meaghan Burke
Brooklyn, NY

Patrick Burke
Pittsburgh, PA

Stephen Burns
Chicago, IL

Burnt Sugar Index,LLC
NY, NY

Kayleigh Butcher
Chicago, IL

Aubrey Byerly

Taylor Ho Bynum
New Haven, CT

Cal Performances
Berkeley, CA

Hermes Camacho
Austin, TX

Nerissa Campbell
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Campbell
Oakland, CA

Cindy Capraro

Christian Carey
South Amboy, NJ

Joshua Carro
Los Angeles, CA

Edmar Castenada

Catalyst Quartet
New York, NY

Christopher Cerrone
Brooklyn, NY

Raven Chacon

Anthony Cheung

Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Mary Ellen Childs
Minneapolis, MN

Danny Clay
San Francisco, CA

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Benjamin Cold
Minneapolis, MN

David Coll
Oakland, CA

COLLIDE
Austin, TX

Lisa Renée Coons
Kalamazoo , MI

Cordova Quartet
Austin, TX

Heather Cornell
Valley Cottage, NY

Dancers’ Group
San Francisco, CA

Jeanna Dara
Brooklyn, NY

Thanos Daskalopoulos

Degenerate Art Ensemble
Seattle, WA

Amy Denio
Seattle, WA

Paul Desenne

Bryce Dessner

Deviant Septet
New York, NY

Nicholas Deyoe
Alhambra, CA

Natacha Diels
Brooklyn, NY

Mark Dion
New York, NY

Michelle Dorrance
New York, NY

Andrew Drury
Brooklyn, NY

Danny Echevarria
Los Angeles, CA

Aaron Einbond
New York, NY

Either/Or, Inc.

Hadi Eldebek
Brooklyn, NY

Tamzin Ferré Elliott
Annandale on Hudson, NY

Kahil El’Zabar

Matthew Evans
Brooklyn, NY

Peter Evans
Queens, NY

Fabrica Records
Brooklyn, NY

Face the Music
New York, NY

Tim Fain
Los Angeles, CA

Ginger Farley
Chicago, IL

Vicki Fingalson

Dave Fiuczynski

Stephanie Fleischmann
Brooklyn, NY

Ashley Fure
New York, NY

Fusebox

Amy Garapic
Brooklyn, NY

Travis Garrison
Greenville, NC

Sean Griffin
Los Angeles, CA

Satoshi Haga

Sean Hagerty
New York, NY

Joseph Hallman
Philadelphia, PA

Hamilton Live

Sadie Harrison
Shaftesbury, Great Britain

Mary Harron
Brooklyn, NY

Ted Hearne
Brooklyn, NY

Rebekah Heller
Brooklyn, NY

Dieter Hennings
Lexington, KY

Holter Museum of Art
Helena, MT

Geoffrey Hudson
Amherst, MA

Iktus Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Innova Recordings
St. Paul, MN

Inscape Chamber Orchestra
Bethesda, MD

International Contemporary Ensemble
New York, NY

Bryan Jacobs

Pierre Jalbert

Dana Jessen
Oberlin, OH

Wang Jie

JP Jofre
New York, NY

Scott Johnson

Alan Johsnon

David Merlin Jones (Sidwell Friends School – Music Department)

Bill Kalinkos
Columbia, MO

Ramya Sundaresan Kapadia

Mugiyono Kasido
Surakarta, Indonesia

Howie Kenty
Brooklyn, NY

Marina Kifferstein
New York, NY

Mari Kimura
New York, NY

Jonathon Kirk
Chicago, IL

Knockdown Center
Maspeth, NY

Joshua Kohl
Seattle, WA

Glenn Kotche
Chicago, IL

Morgan Krauss
Chicago, IL

Kronos Quartet
San Francisco, CA

Fides Krucker
Toronto, Canada

Valerie Kuehne
Brooklyn, NY

Christopher Kuhl
Brooklyn , NY

Sam Kulik
Astoria, NY

Janet Kutulas
El Sobrante, CA

La MaMa
New York, NY

La Otra Orilla
Montreal, Canada

David Lang
New York, NY

Anne Lanzilotti
Brooklyn, NY

Felipe Lara
New York, NY

Libby Larsen
Minneapolis, MN

Steve Larson
Winsted, CT

Pascal Le Boeuf
New York, NY

James Lee III
Edgewood, MD

Nolan Lem
New York City, NY

Jonathan Leshnoff

George Lewis
New York, NY

Nathan Lincoln-DeCusatis
New York, NY

Scott Lindroth
Durham, NC

line upon line percussion
Austin, TX

Pete List
Brooklyn, NY

Thomas Loewenheim

Lorelei Ensemble
Cambridge, MA

Jenna Lyle
Chicago, IL

Eric Lyon
Blacksburg, VA

Steven Mackey
Princeton, NJ

Jeffrey Madison

Make Music New York
Brooklyn, NY

Malpaso Dance Company
Havana, Cuba

Wu Man
San Diego, CA

Mat Maneri
Brooklyn, NY

Jessie Reagen Mann
New York, NY

Marina Abramovic Institute
New York, NY

Susan Marshall

Scott Marshall
New York, NY

Fritz Masten

Dylan Mattingly
New Haven, CT

Daniel McBride AKA 13 Hands
Montclair, NJ

Bob McGrath
New York, NY

Joe McPhee

Todd Meehan
Waco, TX

Jack Mehler

MELA Foundation
New York, NY

Sowah Mensah

Miro Quartet

Momenta Quartet
New York, NY

Carson Moody

Lisa Moore
New York, NY

Daphna Mor

Thomas Morgan
New York, NY

Theodore Morrison
Ann Arbor, MI

Erica Mott
Chicago, IL

Nico Muhly

Jeffrey Mumford
Oberlin, OH

NANO Fiction
Austin, TX

Daniel Neumann
Brooklyn, NY

New England Guitar Quartet
West Hartford, CT

Nimbus Dance Works
Jersey City, NJ

NOW Ensemble
New York, NY

Katherine Oakes

Larry Ochs
Berkeley, CA

Suki O’Kane
Oakland, CA

Miles Okazaki
Brooklyn, NY

Laurie Olinder

Jaime Oliver

Pauline Oliveros

Tawnie Olson
New Haven, CT

Thomas O’Neill
Bergen Community College

Steven Osgood
Ossining, NY

Outlier
San Antonio, TX

Margel Overton

Tae Hong Park

Parker Quartet
Boston, MA

Aaron Parks

Richard Reed Parry
Montreal, Canada

David Passmore

Lavinia Pavlish

Jessica Pavone
Brooklyn, NY

Peggy Pearson

Doug Perkins
Chicago, IL

Sebastian Peters-Lazaro
Los Angeles, CA

Prasanna

Jonathan Melville Pratt
Brooklyn, NY

Jonathan Ragonese
New York, NY

Ranee Ramaswamy
Minneapolis, MN

Aparna Ramaswamy
Minneapolis, MN

Sarah Ratcliff

Trevor Reed
Hotevilla, AZ

Carla Rees
London, United Kingdom

Prudence Rees-Lee

Renee Baker Chicago Modern Orchestra Project & FAQtet Ensemble
Chicago, IL

Samuel Rhodes

Gyan Riley
Brooklyn, NY

Amanda Ringger

Rockefeller Chapel, University of Chicago

John Fitz Rogers
Columbia, SC

Joshua Roman
New York, NY

Roulette Intermedium, Inc.
Brooklyn, NY

Christopher Rouse

Dave Ruder
Brooklyn, NY

Adam Rudolph
Maplewood, NJ

Sandbox Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Eleonor Sandresky
Brooklyn, NY

Steve Schick

David Schweizer

Seattle Symphony Orchestra
Seattle, WA

Madeleine Shapiro
New York, NY

Caroline Shaw
New York, NY

Judith Sherman
New York, NY

Erika Chong Shuch

Sarah Silver
San Antonio, TX

Sirius Quartet

Sky-Pony

Kate Soper

Sam Sowyrda

Lalit Subramanian

Catherine Sullivan

John Supko
Durham, NC

Kathleen Supove
Brooklyn, NY

Rajna Swaminathan
New York, NY

Anjna Swaminathan

Talea Ensemble
New York, NY

Ohad Talmor
Brooklyn, NY

The Apple Hill String Quartet

The Paul Dresher Ensemble [aka Musical Traditions, Inc.]
San Francisco, CA

Christopher Theofanidis
New Haven, CT

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Thrill Jockey Records

TIGUE
Brooklyn, NY

Adam Tinkle
Saratoga Springs, NY

Jeff Tobias
Brooklyn, NY

Joan Tower
Red Hook, NY

Maureen Towey

Annie Trépanier
Winsted, CT

Jason Treuting
Princeton, NJ

Danny Tunick
Brooklyn, NY

Ken Ueno
Berkeley, CA

Dan VanHassel
Oakland, CA

Aleksandra Vrebalov
New York City, NY

Michael Wall
Salt Lake City, UT

John Walsh
Brooklyn, NY

Jen Wang
Richmond, CA

Ellen Warkentine

Monte Weber
Brooklyn, NY

David Wegehaupt
Oakland, CA

Dan Weiss
Brooklyn, NY

Travis Weller
Austin, TX

Philip White
Brooklyn, NY

White Eagle Hall / Jersey City Theater Center

Allen Willner

Gary Wise

Daniel Wohl
Brooklyn, NY

Theresa Wong
Berkeley, CA

Randall Woolf
Brooklyn, NY

La Monte Young
New York, NY

Phil Young
Saratoga, CA

Marian Zazeela
New York, NY

Evan Ziporyn
Lexington, MA

(Working Title)
Garrison, NY

12th Annual Carlsbad Music Festival
Carlsbad, CA

2016 LCCMF Young Composer Seminar Commission
Burlington, VT

A Dance for Life: Stories of Surviving – a New Song-Cycle Ballet
Lambertville, NJ

a veil of liquid diamonds
Boston, MA

Adams @ 70: Celebrating Music of our Time
St. Louis, MO

American Music Festival 2016: Songs of the Rolling Earth
Troy, NY

American Notes: Harold Meltzer and Jessie Montgomery
New York, NY

Amy Briggs: Piano Etudes of David Rakowski, Vol. 4
New Rochelle, NY

And All Time
Chicago, IL

And the Hummingbird Says . . .
New York, NY

Appeasing Radhika
Brooklyn, NY

ARA: Waterways Time Weaves
Oakland, CA

Artist Engagement Residency at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
Chicago, IL

Blue Streak Ensemble performs 12 concerts
Cleveland, OH

Borders
Brooklyn, NY

Brooklyn ReZound
Brooklyn, NY

Carolyn Dorfman Dance’s “Traces”
Newark, NJ

Carve
Oberlin, OH

CAST, STAGE, AUTHOR
New York, NY

Chaconne: a New Work for String Quartet by Fred Lerdahl
Philadelphia, PA

Chamber Dance Project Project
Washington, DC

Chimera: New work for five-string baroque cello by Ken Ueno
Berkeley, CA

City Boy: Music of Judd Greenstein
New York, NY

City of Glass
New York, NY

CLEPSYDRA
Brooklyn, NY

Color Theory: Saxophones and Percussion
Brooklyn and Philadelphia, NY and PA

Connecting Hamburg and Louisiana with Christopher Trapani
Hamburg, DE

Cuatro Corridos – A Chamber Opera
San Diego, CA

Cultivate – emerging composers institute and concert
Cortlandt Manor, NY

Death With Interruptions – bringing a new opera to new audiences
San Francisco, CA

Dia de los Muertos, Lake Monsters, and Plants
Twin Cities, MN

Digital Streaming of SONiC: Sounds of a New Century
New York, NY

DOT AIR – experimental music and art festival
Pawtucket, RI

Dream Seminar/Drömseminarium
Bellport, NY

Ecstatic Music Festival 2016
New York, NY

Edgefest 2016: 20 Years at the Edge
Ann Arbor, MI

Eko Nova – premiere season
Omaha, NE

Embedded Environments
Buffalo, NY

ENSEMBLE IPSE – New Commissions
New York, NY

Family Tree – Street Scenes
Easton, PA

Fathom
Beacon, NY

Fellow Fellow: A Debut Album
Los Angeles, CA

Five
Newark, NJ

FLUX Quartet Double LP: Spencer Topel
Hanover, NH

Galileo
Santa Monica, CA

George Lewis Portrait Album
Chicago, IL

Gerald Clayton | Piedmont Blues Project
Durham, NC

Hannibal’s One Land, One River, One People Composer Community Outreach
Saratoga Springs, NY

Harrison 100 / Thingamajigs 20
Oakland and Joshua Tree, CA

Heritage/Evolution: PRISM Quartet with Joe Lovano
Philadelphia and New York, PA and NY

Hydrogen(2)Oxygen
Santa Cruz and Los Angeles, CA

IlluminArts presents Pulitzer Prize winning composition directed by R. B. Schlather
Miami, FL

Inside You Is Me
San Francisco, CA

InterPlay
Schenectady, NY

Jesse Jones: persona mechanica
Oberlin, OH

John Lindberg & Wadada Leo Smith: Celestial Weather Midwest Duets
Grand Rapids, MI

Ken Ueno: Throat-singing, orchestra, and a new work
Pittsburgh, PA

Kurtág Piano Duet Commissioning Project
New York, NY

L.A. Signal Lab: Whisper & Howl
Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, CA

Land Bridge
Winston-Salem, NC

LIgNEouS 4 – A new Work for Marimba and String Quartet
Brooklyn, NY

Luke DuBois Artist Residency and Installation
Brunswick, ME

Marfa Sounding: Alvin Lucier and Charles Curtis
Marfa, TX

Marksman
New York, NY

Mega-Organ: the interactive improvisation space
New York, NY

Mill Town Memories
Lewiston, ME

Music of Maurice Chedid
Bloomfield, NJ

Neurosonics (cont.)
Chicago, IL

New American Works at the 2016 Ojai Music Festival
Ojai, CA

New works for flute and piano: collaboration, commission, and concert tour
Rochester, NY

Newark in Tune
Newark, NJ

OME Marathon Concert
Mesa, AZ

Open Source: the wulf.’s Electronic Music Series
Los Angeles, CA

Petite Afrique: The Other Black in Harlem
New York, NY

Phono Solo
Seattle, WA

Quo Vadis: A New Composition for Old Instruments
Charlottesville, VA

RAGAS & POLYPHONY: New works for multi-track Indian vocals, just intonation piano and tabla by Michael Harrison
New York, NY

Resonant Bodies Festival 2015
New York, NY

Rift
Santa Cruz, CA

SCAT!
New York, NY

Second Inversion – On Demand Videos
Seattle, WA

Should we go?
New York, NY

Silent Voices
New York, NY

Six Perspectives on Latin America
New York, NY

So Percussion and Shara Nova record ‘Time Line’
Brooklyn, NY

Somewhere in the Upstream
Amherst, MA

Speak Angels
San Francisco, CA

String Quartet 3 (working title only)
Buffalo, NY

Studio Recording and Performances of Golijov’s Azul and Other Works with Yo-Yo Ma
Brooklyn, NY

Swarms of Light in Metal: Trevor Saint, glockenspiel
Whitewater, WI

Synth Nights: Lesley Flanigan
New York, NY

The Black Iris Project’s “Brown Baby”
New York, NY

The Click! Commission: Hannah Lash
Boulder, CO

The Dither Extravaganza! 2016
Brooklyn, NY

The Extended, Evening-Length “Myelination”
New York, NY

The Garden of Diverging Paths
New York, NY

The Grey Land
Brooklyn, NY

The Lost String Quartet
New York, NY

The Other Side of My Heart
Greensboro, NC

The performer-composer: performances, lectures, commission projects w/Jane Rigler, flutes & electronics
Multiple Cities, ES

The Pianos without Organs Festival
Raleigh, NC

The Propelled Heart’ World Premiere with Lisa Fischer
San Francisco, CA

The Rendezvous
New York, NY

The Sea: Tales of Lapham
Boston, MA

The Set Up: Saya Lei
New York City, NY

THIEFS: Up/Rooted
New York, NY

Tod Dockstader: From the Archives
Boulder, CO

Trance-figured Night with Dal Niente and Murat Çolak
Chicago, IL

Tyondai Braxton’s Fly By Wire with Dance Heginbotham
New York, NY

Uncharted Destiny
Newark, NJ

Vireo: The Spiritual Biography of a Witch’s Accuser, Episode 9
San Francisco, CA

Works for Contrabass by Gosfield, Masaoka, Sharp, & Thirlwell
New York, NY

 

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Alarm Will Sound, Inc.American Contemporary Music Ensemble

American Lyric Theater Center Inc.

American Modern Ensemble

American Opera Projects

Argento New Music Project

Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, New York City Chapter, Inc.

C4: the Choral Composer/Conductor Collective

Da Capo Chamber Players, Inc.

Dither

Ear Heart Music

Either/Or, Inc.

Ekmeles

ETHEL’s Foundation for the Arts

Harvestworks

ISSUE Project Room

League of Composers/ISCM

Look & Listen Festival

Mantra Percussion

Metropolis Ensemble

MIVOS quartet

Momenta Quartet

Music at the Anthology

Music From China

Music Mondays

New Amsterdam Presents

New Thread Quartet

Newspeak

PRISM Quartet, Inc.

Qubit New Music

Quintet of the Americas

S.E.M. Ensemble

So Percussion

Talea Ensemble

Talujon, Inc.

The Firehouse Space

The Jazz Gallery

TRANSIT

VisionIntoArt Presents Inc.

Wet Ink Music Productions, Inc.

Yarn/Wire

10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

a canary torsi | Yanira Castro
Brooklyn, NY

A Far Cry
Jamaica Plain, MA

Albany Symphony
Albany, NY

Alejandro Rutty
Greensboro, NC

Alia Musica Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Alonzo King LINES Ballet
San Francisco, CA

American Composers Orchestra
New York, NY

Amy Williams
Pittsburgh, PA

Andrew McManus
Chicago, IL

Anthony Davis
San Diego, CA

Bates Dance Festival
Lewiston, ME

Ben Neill
Garrison, NY

Blackstone Valley Tourism Council
Pawtucket, RI

Blue Streak Ensemble
Cleveland, OH

Bowdoin International Music Festival
Brunswick, ME

Brian Baumbusch
Santa Cruz, CA

Bridge Records
New Rochelle, NY

Brooklyn Youth Chorus
Brooklyn, NY

Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music
Santa Cruz, CA

Carlsbad Music Festival
Carlsbad, CA

Carolyn Dorfman Dance
Union, NJ

Castle of our Skins Concert Series
Boston, MA

Chamber Dance Project
Washington, DC

Classical KING FM 98.1 / Second Inversion
Seattle, WA

Collect/Project
Chicago, IL

Colorado Music Festival
Boulder, CO

Companion Star Inc
Patchogue, NY

Cooper Wolken
Los Angeles, CA

Copland House
Cortlandt Manor, NY

Dana Jessen
Oberlin, OH

Daria Faïn
Brooklyn, NY

David Felder
East Aurora, NY

Dena Beard
San Francisco, CA

Dither
Brooklyn, NY

Dohee Lee Puri Arts
Oakland, CA

Dorrance Dance
New York, NY

Duke Performances
Durham, NC

Edward Einhorn
New York, NY

Eighth Blackbird
Chicago, IL

Elinor Frey
Montreal, CA

Empire State Youth Orchestras
Schenectady, NY

Ensemble Dal Niente
Chicago, IL

Ensemble Ipse
Brooklyn, NY

Fifth House Ensemble
Chicago, IL

Garrett + Moulton Productions
San Francisco, CA

Gavin Chuck
New York, NY

Hans Tammen
Brooklyn, NY

Helen Simoneau
Winston-Salem, NC

Ian David Rosenbaum
Brooklyn, NY

IlluminArts
Miami Beach, FL

James Ilgenfritz
New York City, NY

Jane Rigler
Colorado Springs, CO

Javier Farias
Potomac, MD

Jennifer Burris
Bogotá, CO

Jeremy McQueen
New York, NY

John Lindberg
Battle Creek, MI

Joseph Phillips
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Weare
Brooklyn, NY

Keith Witty
New York, NY

Kerrytown Concert House
Ann Arbor, MI

Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival
Burlington, VT

Laura Watts
Easton, PA

Left Coast Chamber Ensemble
San Francisco, CA

LEIMAY
Brooklyn, NY

Lisa Bielawa
New York, NY

Malini Srinivasan and Dancers
Brooklyn, NY

Manitoga
Garrison, NY

Martin Rowe
New York, NY

Merkin Concert Hall
New York, NY

Michael Dessen
Irvine, CA

Michael Harrison
Yonkers, NY

Mivos Quartet
Brooklyn, NY

Mosaic Dance Theater Company
Glen Ridge, NJ

MPLS (ImPulse)
Twin Cities, MN

Murat Çolak
Boston, MA

Music Mondays
New York, NY

Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company
Fort Lee, NJ

Noah Meites
Los Angeles, CA

Oh My Ears
Phoenix, AZ

Ojai Music Festival
Ojai, CA

Omaha Chamber Music Society
Omaha, NE

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
New York, NY

Pianos without Organs
Raleigh, NC

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
Brooklyn and Philadelphia, NY and PA

Resonant Bodies Festival
New York, NY

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

Rulon Brown
Seattle, WA

Sarah Hennies
Ithaca, NY

Sarah Outhwaite
Brooklyn, NY

Saratoga Performing Arts Center
Saratoga, NY

Sky Macklay
New York, NY

So Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Somi
New York, NY

Spencer Frohwirth
Newark, NJ

Spencer Topel
Hanover, NH

St. Louis Symphony
St. Louis, MO

Starkland
Boulder, CO

Stephanie Griffin
New York, NY

Susan Narucki
San Diego, CA

The Daedalus Quartet
New York City, NY

The Industry
Los Angeles, CA

The Kitchen
New York, NY

The Knights
Brooklyn, NY

the wulf.
Los Angeles, CA

Thingamajigs
Oakland, CA

Three Notch’d Road: The Charlottesville Baroque Ensemble
Charlottesville, VA

Trevor Saint
New Haven, CT

Urban Bush Women
Brooklyn, NY

WCV, Inc. / Wally Cardona
Brooklyn, NY

Xak Bjerken
Ithaca, NY

Zach Sheets
Rochester, NY

PROJECT GRANTS

92Y Concerts Presents New Music by Vijay Iyer
New York, NY

A Commission and Regional Premiere of The Radio Hour by Jake Heggie
Minneapolis, MN

Abandon Fear
Boston, MA

American Notes – a musical exploration
New York, NY

American Power: Mitch Epstein and ErikFriedlander Commission/World Premiere
Minneapolis, MN

American Voices: New Choral Works
San Francisco, CA

An Afternoon with Jennifer Higdon, composer
Fort Worth, TX

Andrew Norman: Play
Boston, MA

Bach Unwound
New York, NY

being Here…/this time
New York, NY

Big Fun
Charleston, SC

Birmingham New Music Festival
Birmingham, AL

Bonhoeffer- A Choral-Theater work by Thomas Lloyd
Philadelphia, PA

Boston Counterpoint
Boston, MA

Branches: So Percussion performances and residency at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Chintimini Chamber Music Festival Commission/Residency
Corvallis, OR

Cinderella: A New Score for a Restored Silent Film
Houston, TX

Commission: On the Mutability of Time
Minneapolis, MN

Court/Garden (CG)
New York, NY

Crosscurrents
Fort Lee, NJ

Crossing Boundaries: New Music for Dance in China
Beijing and Guangdong, China

David Lang’s ‘love fail,’ with Anonymous 4
New York, NY

David Ludwig Violin Concerto Consortium Commission
Burlington, VT

Dithyrambalina
New Orleans, LA

Divertimento #4 for Piano
Quartet Moab, UT

Double Jeopardy (2013) for octet, commissioned by Ensemble Proton Bern
Bern, Switzerland

Dry Spell
St. Paul, MN

Echoes, Westminster Performing Arts Center, Bloomfield College
Bloomfield, NJ

Edgefest 2014: BAS(S)ically Sound
Ann Arbor, MI

Elicit Inquest
Easton, PA

Emerging Composers Partnership 2014-15
Chicago, IL

End of the World
San Diego, CA

Europa: new piano work by Jonathan Howard Katz
Chicago, IL

FALL
Lambertville, NJ

Four Pianos Festival at JACK
Brooklyn, NY

From The Mountains: Hazel Dickens in Baltimore
Baltimore, MD

Ghosts of Crosstown
Memphis, TN

g-h-o-s-t-c-r-o-w-n(working title)
New York, NY

Glimpse 2
New York, NY

Global Concertos for Soloist and B’shnorkestra
Seattle, WA

Grant Park Music Festival Presents World Premiere and Composer Residency with William Bolcom
Chicago, IL

Heritage/Evolution: PRISM Quartet with Ravi Coltrane and Chris Potter
Philadelphia, PA and NYC

High Zero Festival 2014
Baltimore, MD

HOMEMADE NEW WORKS
New York, NY

I will remember everything
San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley, CA

ICElab
New York, NY

Illuminations
Evanston, IL

Ima Ima – (L’dor Vador) by The Pan Asian Chamber Jazz Ensemble
New York, NY

In the Garden of Sonic Delights
Katonah, NY

INVISIBLE CITIES: FIRST COMMERCIAL RECORDING
Los Angeles, CA

iv: contemporary American music for electric guitar
San Francisco, CA

Jack DeJohnette’s Made In
Chicago, Chicago, IL

Jenny Scheinman and H. Lee Waters | Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait
Durham, NC

Jim Crow’s Tears
Detroit, MI

Joe McCarthy’s Afro Bop Alliance Big Band presents the music of Roland Vaquez, Paquito D’ Rivera and Friends
Washington, DC

KcEMA Happy Hour
Kansas City, MO

Kepler Quartet’s CD3 |completing the 10-quartet Ben Johnston cycle
Milwaukee, WI

Kojo Roney residency at JACK
Brooklyn, NY

L@TE: Pauline Oliveros
Berkeley, CA

Look and Listen Festival Premieres Toy Piano Works by Jo Kondo and Phyllis Chen
New York, NY

MATA JR.
New York, NY

Memory Rings
New York, NY

Metamorphosis Trilogy
New York, NY

Middlemarch in Spring
San Francisco, CA

Music for Contemplation
Brooklyn, NY

Music From China’s 30th Anniversary and Beyond
New York City, NY

Music in their Words
Allendale, MI

New guitar concerto by Clarice Assad
San Francisco, CA

New Music for Viola d’Amore
Treviso,Italy

New work for electric guitar by Davide Ianni
Boston, MA

New Works for the Open-Hole Bass Flute
Chicago, IL

NHSO Artist Residency in the Community with Chris Brubeck
New Haven, CT

Sunstruck Mobile
New York, NY

Philadelphia Freedom Festival
Philadelphia, PA

Pittsburgh Opera: American Opera Composer Residency
Pittsburgh, PA

Predator Songstress: Dictator,
Seattle, WA

Prince of Clouds West Coast Premiere
Los Angeles, CA

Puhutawi: A New Traditional Hopi Sound
Grand Canyon, AZ

Reconstructed: The New Americana
Boston, MA

Riverside Whistles and Bells
Riverside, CA

Roomful of Teeth
North Adams, MA

Roscoe Mitchell New Quintet – Vision Festival XX World Premiere
New York, NY

Roscoe New Opera Workshop
Saratoga Springs, NY

Schuller to Schnyder: A Third Stream Exploration
Chicago, IL

Schulmeister/Pàmies Collaboration at ANODE 2014
New Orleans, LA

SKETCH 4
San Francisco, CA

Snow
NYC and Cherry Valley, NY

Soundwave ((6)) Water
San Francisco, CA

Studio Recording of Bobby Previte’s TERMINALS
New York, NY

Table of Silence Project 9/11: Musician Fees
New York, NY

Tectonics: Brooklyn
Brooklyn, NY

Ten Thousand Birds
St. Louis, MO

The Acoustic Bicycle Tour (West Coast)
CA

The Blind Men and the Elephant by Julie Bour with Commissioned Score by Kyle Olson/Live Music by Violinist Gillian Rivers
New York and New Jersey

The Dither Extravaganza! 2014
Brooklyn, NY

The Gaita and Orchestra Commissioning Project
Worldwide

The Hunger
St. Louis, MO

The Immersive Early Music of Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

The Parable of Otto John
Los Angeles, CA

The Poe Project:Embedded and Buried Alive
Fargo, ND

THE POTATO KING OF BLOCK 72
San Francisco, CA

The Source
New York, NY

The Space Between Us, for 8 strings, and robotic percussion instruments
Seattle, WA

Sunstruck
New York, NY

The Sweetest Song: Traditional Song Genres and Their Performance in Brooklyn
Brooklyn, NY

The War Project
San Francisco, CA

Thingamajigs Exhibit @ Center for New Music
San Francisco, CA

Turbine (working title)
Philadelphia, PA

Unforgettable: A disc of the music of George Tsontakis
Troy, NY

Uniting New Music Communities in Oregon
Portland, OR

Voices from the Dust Bowl
Chicago, IL

We Won’t Be in Love Much Longer
Seattle, WA

Wet Ink Ensemble- Relay / TEXTUREN Tour
Lucerne, Switzerland

Punching The Clock
Lancaster, PA

Wuorinen: Orchestral works, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Levine/Serkin
New Rochelle, NY

Zazzi and the Trees of Omburo
Saratoga, CA

Zeke Suite
Appleton, WI

ORGANIZERS

10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

92nd Street Y
New York, NY

a canary torsi | Yanira Castro,
Brooklyn, NY

Afro Bop Alliance
Washington, DC

Alarm Will Sound
New York, NY

Albany Symphony
Albany, NY

Karim Al-Zand
Houston, TX

American Lyric Theater (ALT)
New York, NY

Amy Seiwert’s Imagery
San Francisco, CA

Arts for Art
New York, NY

Ashley Bathgate
New York, NY

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Berkeley, CA

Beth Morrison Projects
New York, NY

Birmingham Art Music Alliance
Birmingham, AL

Philip Blackburn
St.Paul, MN

Samantha Boshnack
Seattle, WA

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Malden, MA

Bridge Records
New Rochelle, NY

Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC)
Brooklyn, NY

Buglisi Dance Theatre
New York, NY

Taylor Ho Bynum
New Haven, CT

Cantaloupe Music
Brooklyn, NY

Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts, Inc.
Katonah, NY

Center for New Music
San Francisco, CA

Christopher Cerrone
Brooklyn, NY

Phyllis Chen
Astoria, NY

Yafonne Chen
San Francisco, CA

Chicago Jazz Philharmonic
Chicago, IL

Chicago Philharmonic Society
Chicago, IL

Winston Choi
Chicago, IL

Danmari – Yass Hakoshima Movement Theatre
Montclair, NJ

Degenerate Art Ensemble
Seattle, WA

Jack DeJohnette
Woodstock, NY

Dither
Brooklyn, NY

Duke Performances
Durham, NC

Max Duykers
Brooklyn, NY

Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble
Eugene, OR

Fifth House Ensemble
Chicago, IL

Giacomo Fiore
San Francisco, CA

Marjani Forte
New York, NY

John Glover
Brooklyn, NY

Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble
Allendale, MI

Grant Park Music Festival
Chicago, IL

Sean Griffin
Los Angeles, CA

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Lawton Hall
Milwakee, WI

Harvestworks
New York, NY

Howard Hersh
Nevada City, CA

High Zero Foundation
Baltimore, MD

International Contemporary Ensemble
New York, NY

ISSUE Project Room
Brooklyn, NY

Jack Arts, Inc.
Brooklyn, NY

Kristopher Johnson
Detroit, MI

Kansas City Electronic Music and Arts Alliance
Kansas City, MO

Kepler Quartet
Milwaukee, WI

Friedrich Heinrich Kern
New York, NY

Kerrytown Concert House
Ann Arbor, MI

Kitka, Inc.
Oakland, CA

Kurtis Lamkin
Charleston, TX

Leah Stein Dance Company
Philadelphia, PA

Mu-Xuan Lin
Los Angeles, CA

Lorelei Ensemble
Cambridge, MA

Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
Los Angeles, CA

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

Keeril Makan
Cambridge, MA

Marion Walker
Reno, NV and Seattle, WA

MEDIATE Art Group
San Francisco, CA

Moab Music Festival
Moab, UT

Music at the Anthology, Inc. (MATA)
New York, NY

Music From China
New York, NY

Musiqa
Houston, TX

Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company
Fort Lee, NJ

New Haven Symphony Orchestra
New Haven, CT

New Orleans Airlift
New Orleans, LA

New Thread Quartet
New York, NY

Nimbus Dance Works
Jersey City, NJ

Meg Okura
New York, NY

Opera Memphis
Memphis, TN

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
New York, NY

Cristina Pato
New York, NY

Christopher Patregnani
Saratoga Springs, NY

Phantom Limb Company
New York, NY

Pittsburgh Opera, Inc.
Pittsburgh, PA

Robert (Bobby) Previte
New York, NY

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
New York, NY and Philadelphia, PA

Trevor Reed
Hotevilla, AZ

Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Riverside Art Museum
Riverside, CA

Roomful of Teeth
New York,NY

Dominique Schafer
Los Angeles, CA

Andrew Schloss
Seattle, WA

Kathryn Schulmeister
Chicago, IL

Allen Shearer
San Francisco, CA

Erik Spangler
Baltimore, MD

RoseAnne Spradlin
New York, NY

Brandin Steffensen
New York, NY

Stephen Petronio Company
New York, NY

Maarten Stragier
Brussels, Belgium

Marc Teicholz
San Francisco, CA

The Cliburn
Fort Worth, TX

The Crossing
Philadelphia, PA

The Mann Center for the Performing Arts
Philadelphia, PA

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Third Rail Projects
New York, NY

Vermont Symphony Orchestra
Burlington, VT

VocalEssence
Minneapolis, MN

Volti
San Francisco, CA

Jeremy Wagner
Berkeley, CA

Walker Art Center
Minneapolis, MN

Laura Watts
Easton, PA

Wet Ink Ensemble
New York, NY

Tyler Wilcox
Brooklyn, NY

Randall Woolf
Brooklyn, NY

Netta Yerushalmy
New York, NY

COLLABORATORS

Bard College Conservatory of Music
Annandale on Hudson, NY

ENSEMBLE MISE-EN, INC.
New York, NY

Face the Music
New York, NY

JACK Quartet
New York, NY

Look and Listen
Brooklyn, NY

Lorelei Ensemble
Cambridge, MA

National Queer Arts Festival
San Francisco, CA

New Music Bay Area
Oakland, CA

Stephen O’Malley
Paris, France

The Paul Dresher Ensemble [aka Musical Traditions, Inc.]
San Francisco, CA

The Theatre Project
Baltimore, MD

Thingamajigs
Oakland, CA

Young People’s Chorus of New York City
New York, NY

Muhal Richard Abrams
New York, NY

John Luther Adams
New York, NY

Kyle Walker Akins
Reno, NV

Karim Al-Zand
Houston, TX

American Composers Forum
St. Paul, MN

Timo Andres
Brooklyn, NY

Anna and Elizabeth
Baltimore, MD

Matthew Antaky
San Francisco, CA

Archive of Documentary Arts, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library,
Duke University
Durham, NC

Clarice Assad
New York, NY

Harrison Bankhead
Chicagoland, IL

Eric Banks
Seattle, WA

Rusty Banks
Lancaster, PA

Michael Barrett
New York, NY

Juantio Becenti
Aneth, UT

Judith Berkson
Brooklyn, NY

John Berndt
Baltimore, MD

Ranjit Bhatnagar
Brooklyn, NY

Bias Studios
Springfield, VA

Daniel Blomquist
San Francisco, CA

William Bolcom
Ann Arbor, MI

Joshua Bornfield
Baltimore, MD

Boston Guitarfest
Boston, MA

Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Malden, MA

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Boston, MA

Julie Bour
New York, NY

Brentano String Quartet
New York, NY

Deborah Brevoort
North Bergen, NJ

Mark Broschinsky

Laura Brown
Moab, UT

Chris Brubeck
Los Angeles, CA

David Bruce
San Diego, CA

Rick Burkhardt
Brooklyn, NY

Frank Byrne
Kansas City, MO

Joan Caldwell
Corvallis, OR

Canyon Records
Phoenix, AZ

Elizabeth Carena
New York, NY

Erik Carlson
New York, NY

Catalyst Quartet
New York, NY

Orlando Cela
Beijing, China

Phyllis Chen
Astoria, NY

Yi Chen
Kansas City, MO

Cherry Valley Artworks
Cherry Valley, NY

Kyong Mee Choi
Chicago, IL

Mary Chun
San Francisco, CA

Nels Cline
Los Angeles, CA

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Ravi Coltrane
Brooklyn, NY

Composers, Inc.
Berkeley, CA

Conspirare
Austin, TX

Contemporary Portland Orchestra Project
Portland, OR

Jacob Cooper
Brooklyn, NY

Linda Corbitt
Riverside, CA

Shawn Crouch
Miami, FL

Paquito D’ Rivera
North Bergen, NJ

Anthony Davis
San Diego, CA

Lisa Delan

Donnacha Dennehy
Princeton, NJ

Phil Denslow
Lilburn, GA

Jay Derderian
Portland, OR

Zosha Di Castri
New York, NY

Mark Doten
New York, NY

Mark Dresser
San Diego, CA

Tucker Dulin
Brooklyn, NY

David Eisenband
Eugene, OR

Ekmeles
New York, NY

EMPAC – The Curtis R. Priem Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY and New York, NY

ensemble proton
Bern, CH

Mitch Epstein
New York, NY

Robin Estrada
Berkeley, CA

ETHEL’s Foundation for the Arts
New York, NY

Ray Evanoff
New Orleans, LA

Morgan Evans-Weiler
Boston, MA

Luosha Fang
Philadelphia, PA

Fargo-Moorhead Opera
Fargo, ND

Suzanne Farrin
New York, NY

Scott Faulkner
Reno, NV

Jim Findlay
Brooklyn, NY

Simon Fink
St. Joseph, MO

First Look Sonoma
Sebastopol, CA

Daniel Fish
New York, NY

Fort Worth Opera
Fort Worth, TX

Forum Neue Musik Luzern
Emmen, Switzerland

Erik Friedlander
New York, NY

Robbie Fulks
Chicago, IL

Marco Fusi
Milano, IT

Diana Gannett
Ann Arbor, MI

Stacy Garrop
Chicago, IL

Robbie Gjersoe
Chicago, IL

Monroe Golden
Pell City, AL

Malcolm Goldstein
Sheffield, VT

Philip Gotanda
Berkeley, CA

Grand Canyon Music Festival
Grand Canyon, AZ

Larry Gray
Chicago, IL

Jessica Grindstaff
New York, NY

Group Delphi/Justin Hersh
Almeda, CA

Moon Young Ha
New York, NY

Sean Hagerty
New York, NY

Harkness Dance Center
New York, NY

Harvestworks
New York, NY

Imamyar Hasanov
San Francisco, CA

Ted Hearne
Los Angeles, CA

Jake Heggie
San Francisco, CA

Mark Helias
New York, NY

Jennifer Higdon
Philadelphia, PA

Ben Hjertmann
Chicago, IL

Holy Sheboygan!
Fox Valley, WI

Eric Honour
Kansas City, MO

Robert Honstein
Boston, MA

Bart Hopkin
Point Reyes Station, CA

Holland Hopson
Tuscaloosa, AL

Adam Hougland
Bristol, Great Britain

Houston Cinema Arts Society
Houston, TX

Bella Hristova
New York, NY

Ruo Huang
New York, NY

Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art
Peekskill, NY

Craig Hultgren
Birmingham, AL

Jeffery Kyle Hutchins
Minneapolis, MN

Davide Ianni
Boston, MA

IN/S
San Francisco/Oakland, CA

Kamran Ince
Memphis, TN

innova Recordings
St. Paul, MN

Mara Isaacs
Princeton, NJ

Vijay Iyer
New York, NY

Jacob Burns Film Center
Pleasantville, NY

David A. Jaffe
Berkeley, CA

Noah Jenkins
Eugene, OR

John Cage Trust
Red Hook, NY

Chuck Johnson
Oakland, CA

Kari Johnson
Overland Park, KS

Timothy Ernest Johnson
Chicago, IL

Ben Johnston
Madison, WI

Juan Camilo Hernández Sánchez
Paris, France

Jonathan Howard Katz
Brooklyn, NY

Zoe Keating
San Francisco, CA

Kevin Keller
New York, NY

William Kennedy
Albany, CA

Jonathan Khuner
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Kim
Philadelphia, PA

Joshua Kohl
Seattle, WA

Jo Kondo
Tokyo, Japan

Mary Montgomery
Koppel, MA

Tom Kraines
Philadelphia, PA

Morgan Krauss
Chicago, IL

Jay Kreimer
Lincoln, NE

Andrew Kype

Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

Andrew Lafkas
New York, NY

David Lang
New York, NY

Orlando le Fleming
Brooklyn, NY

Cheryl Leonard
San Francisco, CA

Shaw Pong Liu
Boston, MA

Thomas Lloyd
Philadelphia, PA

Benjamin Loeb
El Paso, TX

Quincy Long
New York, NY

Michael Lowenstern
Brooklyn, NY

Phil Lowery
Oakland, CA

Alvin Lucier
Middletown, CT

David Ludwig
Philadelphia, PA

Lyndhurst
Tarrytown, NY

Evan Mack
Saratoga Springs, NY

MAK Center for Art and Architecture, L.A., at the Schindler House
West Hollywood, CA

Philip Mantione
Riverside, CA

Ruotao Mao
Ewing, NJ

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA)
North Adams, MA

Joshua McGuire

John Medeski
New York, NY

Marc Mellits
Chicago, IL

Mendelssohn Club Chorus
Philadelphia, PA

Metropolis Ensemble
Jackson Heights, NY

Milford Public Schools
Milford, CT

Katarina Miljkovic
Boston, MA

David Alan Miller
Albany, NY

Roscoe Mitchell
Chicago, IL

Mode Records
New York, NY

Eric Moe
Pittsburgh, PA

Montalvo Arts Center
Saratoga, CA

Stephan Moore
Pawtucket, RI

Jordan Morley
Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Quintron
New Orleans, LA

John Muehleisen
Seattle, WA

Jeff Myers
New York, NY

NakedEye Ensemble
Lancaster, PA

Joe Nankin
Oakland, CA

Neighborhood Music School
New Haven, CT

Neuberger Museum of Art
Purchase, NY

New Albion Records, Inc.
Tivoli, NY

New Asia Chamber Music Society
New York, NY

New Haven Public Schools
New Haven, CT

New World Records
Brooklyn, NY

Haruko Nishimura
Seattle, WA

Vince Norman
Middletown, MD

NOW Ensemble
New York, NY

Pauline Oliveros
Kingston, NY

Kyle Olson
Brooklyn, NY

Scott Ordway
Dresden, ME

Steven Osgood
Ossining, NY

Jim Santi Owen
San Francisco, CA

Pacific Chorale
Santa Ana, CA

Nicole Paiement
San Francisco, CA

Joan Arnau Pàmies
Chicago, IL

William Parker
New York, NY

Zeena Parkins
Oakland, CA

Robert Patterson
Memphis, TN

Performing Arts of Northeast Connecticut
Pomfret, CT

Jack Perla
San Francisco, CA

Erik Peterson
Denver, CO

Petroglyph Music
Norway

Jonathan Pfeffer
Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia Singers
Philadelphia, PA

Sam Pluta
New York, NY

Chris Potter
New York, NY

William Price
Birmingham, AL

Jeff Ray
Oakland, CA

Zach Redler
Brooklyn, NY

Jacqueline Reid
Rutgers, NJ

Gyan Riley
Brooklyn, NY

Gillian Rivers
New York, NY

Jason Roebke
Chicago, IL

Laurie Rogers
Philadelphia, PA

Katharina Rosenberger
San Diego, CA

Mark Roxey
Lambertville, NJ

David Samas
San Francisco, CA

Lanier Sammons
Santa Cruz, CA

Erik Sanko
New York, NY

Michael Santoro
Taipei, Taiwan

Everett Saunders
Harlem, NY

Jenny Scheinman
Petrolia, CA

M.C. Schmidt
Baltimore, MD

Daniel Schnyder
New York, NY

Sabrina Schroeder
Somerville, MA

Gunther Schuller
Boston, MA

Eric Segnitz
Milwaukee, WI

Amy Seiwert
San Francisco, CA

Peter Serkin
MA

Joshua Shank
Austin, TX

Eleanor Shapiro
Berkeley, CA

Craig Shepard
Brooklyn, NY

Silo Kirkland Farm
Springtown, PA

Isaiah Singer
Brooklyn, NY

Sirius Quartet
New York, NY

Sleeping Giant
Brooklyn, NY

Jessie Marion Smith
Seattle, WA

Nancy Stark
Smith, MA

Sarah Kirkland Snider
Princeton, NJ

Steven Snowden
Austin, TX

So Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Emilio Solla
Brooklyn, NY

Janera Solomon
Pittsburgh, PA

Patrick Soluri
New York, NY

Gregory Spears
Brooklyn, NY

Ron Stabinsky
Wilkes-Barre, PA

Alisha Stauss
Pittsfield, MA

Claudia Stevens
Williamsburg, VA

Andrew Stiefel
Eugene, OR

Howard Stokar
New York, NY

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture
Pocantico Hills, NY

Nathaniel Stookey
San Francisco, CA

Lois Svard
Lewisburg, PA

Swoon
New York, NY

Finn Taylor
Berkeley, CA

Clark Tenakhongva
Hoat’Ve’La, AZ

The Industry
Los Angeles, CA

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Augusta Read Thomas
Chicago, IL

Henry Threadgill
New York, NY

Brenda Tom
San Francisco, CA

Trimpin
Seattle, WA

George Tsontakis
Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

Curtis Tucker
Saratoga, NY

Sierra Urich
Bristol, VT

Mike Vargas
Florence, MA

Octavio Vazquez
New York, NY

Roland Vazquez
Red Hook, NY

Luca Veggetti
Italy

Ilan Volkov
Iceland

Michael Volpe
Nutley, NJ

Vox Femina
Los Angeles, CA

Jeff “Tain” Watts
Easton, PA

Wende Museum
Culver City, CA

Mark Winges
San Francisco, CA

Wisconsin Alliance for Composers
Madison, WI

Woodstock Chimes Fund
Shokan, NY

Charles Wuorinen
New York, NY

Yale School of Music: Music In Schools Initiative
New Haven, CT

Byron Au Yong
Seattle, WA

Jeffrey Young
Brooklyn, NY

Jeffrey Zeigler
Brooklyn, NY

Long Zhou
Kansas City, MO

Cary New Music Performance Fund Recipients

Alarm Will Sound

American Contemporary

Music Ensemble

American Lyric Theater

American Modern Ensemble

American Opera Projects

Argento New Music Project

Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, New York City Chapter, Inc.

C4: The Choral Composers/Conductors Collective

Da Capo Chamber Players

Dither

Ear Heart Music

Either/Or

Ekmeles

ETHEL

Harvestworks

ISSUE Project Room

League of Composers/ISCM

Look and Listen Festival

Mantra Percussion

Metropolis Ensemble

MIVOS Quartet

Momenta Quartet

Music at the Anthology (MATA)

Music From China

Music Mondays

New Amsterdam Presents

New Thread Quartet

Newspeak

PRISM Quartet

Qubit New Music

Quintet of the Americas

S.E.M. Ensemble

So Percussion

Talea Ensemble

Talujon

The Firehouse Space

The Jazz Gallery

TRANSIT

VisionIntoArt Presents

Wet Ink

Yarn/Wire

PANELISTS

Kati Agócs
Boston, MA

César Alvarez
Yonkers, NY

Cristian Amigo
New York, NY

Byron Au Yong
Seattle, WA

Renee’ Baker
Chicago, IL

Myra Bazell
Philadelphia, PA

Cindy Bernard
Los Angeles, CA

Edward Bilous
New York, NY

Dan Blake
Brooklyn, NY

Michael Boriskin
Bedford Hills, NY

Kitty Brazelton
New York, NY

Kirsten Broberg
Minneapolis, MN

Margaret Brouwer
Cleveland, OH

Chris Cerrone
New York, NY

Evan Chambers
Ann Arbor, MI

Dorothy Chang
British Columbia, Canada

Yu-Hui Chang
Boston, MA

Eric Chasalow
Boston, MA

Shih-Hui Chen
Houston, TX

Anthony Cheung
Chicago, IL

Michael Ching
Ames, IA

Eric KM Clark
Los Angeles, CA

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Tracey Cockrell
Portland, OR

Chris Cogburn
Austin, TX

Viv Corringham
Minneapolis, MI

Robin Cox
Los Angeles, CA

David Crumb
Eugene, OR

Conrad Cummings
New York, NY

Amy Denio
Seattle, WA

Jay Derderian
Portland, OR

Robert Dick
New York, NY

Avner Dorman
Gettysburg, PA

Hamid Drake
Evanston, IL

Elena Dubinets
Seattle, WA

David Dzubay
Bloomington, IN

Monica Ellis
New York, NY

Jan Faidley
Kansas City, MO

Joshua Fineberg
Charlestown, MA

EvanFlory-Barnes
Seattle, WA

Dan Froot
Los Angeles, CA

Erin Gee
Champaign, IL

Doug Geers
New York, NY

Christine Goodman
Jersey City, NJ

Wycliffe Gordon
New York, NY

Dan Grabois
Madison, WI

Pat Graney
Seattle, WA

Sean Griffin
Los Angeles, CA

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Daron Hagen
New York, NY

Conor Hanick
New York, NY

Barbara Heroux
San Francisco, CA

Julia Holter
Los Angeles, NY

Susie Ibarra
Kerhonkson, NY

Mark Izu
Bay Area, CA

John Jasperse
New York, NY

Margaret Jenkins
San Francisco, CA

Jeri LynneJohnson
Philadelphia, PA

Marcia Kamper
Baltimore, MD

Lisa Kaplan
Chicago, IL

John Kennedy
Berkeley, CA

Marianne Kim
Phoenix, AZ

Amy Knoles
Los Angeles, CA

Joanna Kotze
New York, NY

Joann Kulesza
Baltimore, MD

Kristin Kuster
Ann Arbor, MI

Charlton Lee
San Francisco, CA

Gabriela Lena Frank
Berkeley, CA

Lei Liang
San Diego, CA

Jenny Lin
New York, NY

Lisa Lipton
Portland, OR

Zhou Long
Kansas City, KS

Sarah Lutman
St. Paul, MN

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

Carol McGonnell
New York, NY

Paula Mlyn
New York, NY

James Mobberley
Liberty, MO

Clint Needham
Cleveland Heights, OH

KT Nelson
San Francisco, CA

Miles Okazaki
New York, NY

Madeleine Oldham
Berkeley, CA

Moto Osada
New York, NY

Lothar Osterburg
Brooklyn, NY

Tim Page
Los Angeles, CA

Tae Hong Park
New York, NY

Tomeka Reid
Chicago, IL

Matana Roberts
New York, NY

Harold Rosenbaum
New York, NY

Mathew Rosenblum
Pittsburgh, PA

Daniel Bernard Roumain
New York, NY

Chris Rountree
Los Angeles, CA

Hahn Rowe
New York, NY

Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez
Rochester, NY

Molly Shanahan
Philadelphia, PA

Kevin Stalheim
Milwaukee, WI

Rand Steiger
San Diego, CA

Christopher Tignor
New York, NY

Liuh-Wen Ting
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Vincent
Boston, MA

Ines Voglar
Portland, OR

Lawson White
New York, NY

Meg Wolfe
Los Angeles, CA

Scott Wollschleger
Brooklyn, NY

Francis Wong
San Francisco, CA

Randy Woolf
New York, NY

Jay Alan Yim
Evanston, IL

Julie Yoon
New York, NY

Karim Al-Zand
Houston, TX

David Bakakrishnan
Albany, CA

Stefanie Batten Bland
New York, NY

John Bischoff
Oakland, CA

Per Bloland
Oxford, OH

William Boughton
Guilford, CT

Seth Boustead
Chicago, IL

Don Braden
New York, NY

Elizabeth Brown
Brooklyn, NY

Ronald Brown
Brooklyn, NY

Nicholas Brown
Washington DC

Monique Buzzarté
New York, NY

Sarah Cahill
Berkeley, CA

Ed Campion
Oakland, CA

Raven Chacon
Albuquerque, NM

Luciano Chessa
San Francisco, CA

Andrea Jane Clearfield
Philadelphia, PA

Majel Connery
Berkeley, CA

Kitty Daniels
Seattle, WA

Tina Davidson
Lancaster, PA

Gabriela Diaz
Wellesley, MA

Kurt Doles
Bowling Green, OH

David Dorfman
New London, CT

Dave Douglas
New York, NY

Richard Einhorn
New York, NY

Mandy Fang
Irmo, SC

Jim Findlay
Brooklyn, NY

Jefferson Friedman
Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth Froelich
Fresno, CA

Mara Gibson
Kansas City, MO

Jeremy Gill
Jamaica Plain, MA

David Gompper
Iowa City, IA

Mark Grey
San Francisco, CA

Jorge Villavicencio Grossmann
Ithaca, NY

Paulette Haupt
Waterford, CT

Holly Herndon
San Francisco, CA

Sungji Hong
Denton, TX

Edward Jacobs
Greenville, NC

Craig Hella Johnson
Austin, TX

Virginia Johnson
New York, NY

Bonnie Jones
Baltimore, MD

Chris Jones
Chicago, IL

Victoria Jordanova
Los Angeles, CA

Peiling Kao
Oakland, CA

Bevin Kelley
Providence, RI

Chris Kim
Ithaca, NY

Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

Dorothy Lawson
New York, NY

Sarah Lipstate
Brooklyn, NY

Caroline Mallonee
Buffalo, NY

Miya Masaoka
New York, NY

Arjun Mendiratta
Boston, MA

Susanne Mentzer
San Francisco, CA

Lisa Miller
Dresher, PA

Andy Milne
Shohola, PA

Nicole Mitchell
Long Beach, CA

Andreas Mitisek
Chicago, IL

Beata Moon
Queens, NY

Stephan Moore
Pawtucket, RI

Steve Nalepa
Los Angeles, CA

Amy X Neuburg
Oakland, CA

Francisco Nunez
New York, NY

Linda Oh
New York, NY

Meg Okura
New York, NY

Ed Osborn
Providence, RI

Jason Palmer
Roslindale, MA

Joo Won Park
Oberlin, OH

Bobby Previte
New York, NY

Linda Reichert
Philadelphia, PA

Todd Reynolds
Sunnyside, NY

Belinda Reynolds
San Francisco, CA

Jason Roebke
Chicago, IL

Mikel Rouse
New York, NY

Paul Rudy
Perry, KS

Elena Ruehr
Brookline, MA

Jenny Scheinman
Arcata, CA

Laura Schwendinger
Madison, WI

Amy Seiwert
San Francisco, CA

Sydney Skybetter
New York, NY

Christine Southworth
Lexington, MA

Erik Spangler
Baltimore, MD

Leah Stein
Seattle, WA

Nat Stookey
San Francisco, CA

Stella Sung
Oviedo, FL

Jeff Surak
Chevy Chase, MD

Todd Tarantino
New York, NY

Yosvany Terry
New York, NY

Zhou Tian
Hamilton, NY

Barbara Day Turner
San José, CA

Matt Ulery
Chicago, IL

Andy Vores
Cambridge, MA

Diane Wondisford
New York, NY

Evan Ziporyn
Lexington, MA

10 Hairy Legs
Highland Park, NJ

4Culture
Seattle, WA

a canary torsi | Yanira Castro
Brooklyn, NY

A Far Cry

Adam Abeshouse
Pelham, NY

John Adams

Andy Akiho
New York, NY

Alarm Will Sound
New York, NY

Alia Musica Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA

Alonzo King LINES Ballet

American Academy of Indian Classical Music

American Composers Orchestra
New York, NY

American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME)
New York, NY

Sahba Aminikia
San Francisco, CA

Jennifer Archibald

Arditti String Quartet
London

Tony Arnold

Artist Trust

arx duo
New Haven, CT

Clarice Assad

Frauke Aulbert

Katherine Balch

Michael Baldwin

Marcos Balter
Chicago, IL

Reid Bartelme

Bates Dance Festival

Brian Baumbusch
Santa Cruz, CA

Elizabeth Kennedy Bayer
Phoenix, AZ

Beacon Institute

Jeff Beal

Dena Beard

Jenny Beck
Philadelphia, PA

Ashkan Behzadi
New York, NY

Jonathan Bepler
Brooklyn, NY

José Manuel Berenguer

Derek Bermel

Lisa Bielawa
New York, NY

Anne Carolyn Bird

Xak Bjerken

Blackstone Valley Tourism Council

Blue Streak Ensemble
Cleveland, OH

Jorge Boehringer
Prague

Gabriel Bolaños
Davis, CA

Bowdoin International Music Festival

Tyondai Braxton
Brooklyn, NY

BRIC
Brooklyn, NY

Bridge Records
New Rochelle, NY

Amy Briggs

Taylor Brook
New York, NY

Brooklyn Youth Chorus
Brooklyn, NY

Margaret Brouwer

Rulon Brown
Seattle, WA

Kyle Bruckmann
Oakland, CA

Helena Bugallo

Svjetlana Bukvich
New York, NY

Jennifer Burris

Matthew Burtner
Virginia/Alaska

Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music
Santa Cruz, CA

Calder Quartet

Rachel Calloway

Carlsbad Music Festival

Carolyn Dorfman Dance

Nikki Carrara

Center for New Music
San Francisco, CA

Mark Cetilia
Providence, RI

Chamber Dance Project
DC

Jun Chang

Ryan Chase
Bloomington, IN

Anindo Chatterjee

Maurice Chedid

Carolyn Chen
San Diego, CA

Nan-Cheng Chen
New York, NY

Gerald Chenoweth

Daniel Cilli
Palo Alto, CA

Claremont Trio
New York, NY

Classical KING FM 98.1 / Second Inversion
Seattle, WA

Gerald Clayton

Anna Clyne
Chicago, IL

Murat Çolak
Boston, MA

Collect/Project
Chicago, IL

Colorado Music Festival

ComMUSICation

Companion Star Inc
Patchogue, NY

Castle of our Skins Concert Series
Boston, MA

Steven Cook

Copland House

Brian Coughlin

Lauren Cox

Timothy Cramer

Charles Curtis

Dance Heginbotham
Brooklyn, NY

Ian David Rosenbaum
Brooklyn, NY

Anthony Davis

Kris Davis

Amanda DeBoer
Omaha, NE

Decoda
New York, NY

Erik DeLuca
Charlottesville, VA

Nick DePinna
Los Angeles, CA

Michael Dessen

Bryce Dessner

Joseph Di Ponio
New York, NY

Patrick Diamond
New York, NY

Joe Diebes
Brooklyn, NY

Aaron Diehl

Dither
Brooklyn, NY

Dog Star Orchestra
Los Angeles, CA

Dohee Lee Puri Arts

Donovan Dorrance

Michelle Dorrance
New York, NY

Dorrance Dance

Paul Dresher
Berkeley, CA

Luke DuBois

Duke Performances
Durham, NC

Phoebe Dunn

Max Duykers
Brooklyn, NY

Jason Eckardt
Kerhonkson, NY

EcoSono

Erik Ehn

Eighth Blackbird
Chicago, IL

Nikki Einfeld

Edward Einhorn
New York, NY

Empire State Youth Orchestras

Ensamble de Guitarras de Chile

Fireworks Ensemble
New York, NY

Ensemble Dal Niente
Chicago, IL

Ensemble Ipse

Peter Evans
Queens, NY

Experimental Music Yearbook

Daria Faïn

Javier Farias
Potomac, MD

David Felder
East Aurora, NY

Fifth House Ensemble
Chicago, IL

Lisa Fischer

FLUX Quartet
New York City, NY

Kathleen Flynn

Miguel Frasconi

Elinor Frey
Seattle, WA

Friction Quartet
San Francisco, CA

Spencer Frohwirth

Gallery Aferro

Garrett + Moulton Productions
San Francisco, CA

Stacy Garrop
Chicago, IL

Jeffrey Gavett

Sleeping Giant
NY

Mimi Goese

Osvaldo Golijov

Ashleigh Gordon
Boston, MA

Jacqueline Gordon

Annie Gosfield
New York, NY

Grand Central Art Center

Anthony Green
Providence, RI

Judd Greenstein
Brooklyn, NY

Andrew Greenwald
Stanford, CA

Stephanie Griffin
New York, NY

Lorena Guillén

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Matthew Hardy

Patrick Harlin
Ann Arbor, MI

Joe Dan Harper

Craig Harris

Michael Harrison
Yonkers, NY

Harrison House Music & Arts
Joshua Tree, CA

Ted Hearne
Brooklyn, NY

Sarah Hennies

Barbara Heroux

Jeff Herriott
Fort Atkinson, WI

HOCKET
Los Angeles, CA

Matilda Hofman

John Hollenbeck
Binghamton, NY

Robert Honstein
Boston, MA

Shawn Hove

CHIA YU HSU
WI

Jason Hwang
Morris Plains, NJ

James Ilgenfritz
New York City, NY

IlluminArts
Miami Beach, FL

Indexical

Infrequent Seams

innova Recordings
St. Paul, MN

Inter American Development Bank (IADB)

Roulette Intermedium, Inc.
Brooklyn, NY

International Contemporary Ensemble
New York, NY

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

JACK Quartet
New York, NY

Bryan Jacobs

Zachary James

Dana Jessen
Oberlin, OH

Nathalie Joachim

John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Michael Douglas Jones
East Patchogue, NY

Darius Jones

Jesse Jones
Columbia, SC

Leila Josefowicz

Gabriel Kahane
Brooklyn, NY

KANEKO
Omaha, NE

Aleck Karis

Ayano Kataoka
Amherst, MA

Danya Katok

KCETlink

Aaron Jay Kernis

Kerrytown Concert House
Ann Arbor, MI

Mashkoor Ali Khan

Amirtha Kidambi
Brooklyn, NY

KIMMEL CENTER
Philadelphia, PA

John Klinghammer

Robert Kocik

Stephan Koplowitz

Mary Kouyoumdjian
Brooklyn, NY

Ulrich Krieger
Los Angeles, CA

Tim Krol

Jennifer Lacey

Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival

Lake Monster Brewing

David Lang
New York, NY

Travis Laplante
Brooklyn, NY

Hannah Lash
New Haven, CT

Ingrid Laubrock
BROOKLYN, NY

Ninh Lê Quan

Dohee Lee

Left Coast Chamber Ensemble
San Francisco, CA

LEIMAY
Brooklyn, NY

Tania Leon

Fred Lerdahl

Michael Lewanski
Chicago, IL

George Lewis
New York, NY

Lei Liang
San Diego, CA

John Lindberg
Edgemont, SD

Ellen Lindquist
Rissa

David T. Little

Hannibal Lokumbe

Joe Lovano
New York, NY

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

Alvin Lucier

Curtis Robert Macdonald
Brooklyn, NY

Steven Mackey
Princeton, NJ

Sky Macklay
New York, NY

Robert Maggio
Lambertville, NJ

JC Maillard

Malini Srinivasan and Dancers

Manitoga
Garrison, NY

Marfa Live Arts

Daniel Marschak
Los Angeles, CA

Miya Masaoka

Wade Matthews

Paula Matthusen

Ellen Maynard

John Mayrose

Christopher McElroen

Andrew McManus

Kitty McNamee
Pasadena, CA

Mary Kokie McNaugher

Jeremy McQueen

Marcel McVay

Noah Meites
Los Angeles, CA

Harold Meltzer
New York, NY

Merkin Concert Hall
New York, NY

David Clay Mettens
Rochester, NY

Tiffany Mills
Brooklyn, NY

Stratis Minakakis
Cambridge, MA

Mivos Quartet
Brooklyn, NY

Momenta Quartet
New York, NY

Jessie Montgomery
New York, NY

Stephan Moore
Pawtucket, RI

Miho Morita
Brooklyn, NY

Mosaic Dance Theater Company
Glen Ridge, NJ

MPLS (ImPulse)

Nico Muhly
New York, NY

Jeffrey Mumford
Oberlin, OH

Music Maker Relief Foundation

Music Mondays
New York, NY

Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company
Fort Lee, NJ

Sangwook Nam

Susan Narucki
San Diego, CA

Ben Neill
Garrison, NY

Carrie Nelson

New Amsterdam Presents
Brooklyn, NY

Newark Arts Council

Newark School of the Arts

Nonesuch Records

NOW Ensemble
New York, NY

Now Hear Ensemble
Santa Barbara, CA

Mark Nowakowski

Hitomi Oba
Los Angeles, CA

Oh My Ears
Phoenix, AZ

Ojai Music Festival
Ojai, CA

Oktaven Audio
Yonkers, NY

Dennis O’Leary Gullo

Omaha Chamber Music Society
Omaha, NE

Tom Ontiveros

Oracle Hysterical

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
New York, NY

Charlie Otte

Sarah Outhwaite

PAMAR (Pan American Musical Art Research, Inc.)

Christophe Panzani
Bronx, NY

William Parker

Partch
Los Angeles, CA

Perez Art Museum Miami

Althea Pergakis

Heather Petrie

Mark Phillips
Athens, OH

Joseph Phillips
NY

Pianos without Organs

Sam Pluta
New York, NY

Larry Polansky

Adrianne Pope
Ann Arbor, MI

Linnea Powell
Los Angeles, CA

Freddi Price

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
New York and Philadelphia, NY and PA

Q2 Music
New York, NY

David Rakowski

Arun Ramamurthy

Vicki Ray
Los Angeles, CA

Scott Reber

David Reeder

Ellen Reid
Los Angeles, CA

Resonant Bodies Festival
New York, NY

Todd Reynolds

Gregory Richardson

Jane Rigler
CO

Amanda Ringger

Joshua Roman
New York, NY

Alessandra Rombolá

Roomful of Teeth

Michelle Ross

Martin Rowe

Mark Roxey
Lambertville, NJ

Jonathan Russell

Alejandro Rutty

Trevor Saint
Milwaukee, WI

Katie Salmon

San Francisco Conservatory Guitar Ensemble

Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez

Sanctuary Studios

Kamala Sankaram
Brooklyn, NY

Saratoga Performing Arts Center

Josie Say

R.B. Schlather

Ursel Schlicht

Daniel Schlosberg
Brooklyn, NY

Shared Ground Farmers’ Cooperative

Elliott Sharp
New York, NY

Caroline Shaw
New York, NY

Susanna Shearman

Zach Sheets

Glenn Siegel

Arlene Sierra
London

Emerson Sieverts

Helen Simoneau
Winston-Salem, NC

Adam Sliwinski
Brooklyn, NY

Stephanie Cheng Smith
Los Angeles, CA

Wadada Leo Smith

Bill Smothers

So Percussion
Brooklyn, NY

Somi
New York, NY

Kate Soper

Sound Energy
Boston, MA

Spektral Quartet
Chicago, IL

St. Louis Symphony

Lindsey Stapleton

Starkland
Boulder, CO

John Starosta

Strathmore

Macy Sullivan

Mihoko Suzuki

Peter Swendsen
Oberlin, OH

Albany Symphony
Albany, NY

Hans Tammen
Brooklyn, NY

Three Notch’d Road: The Charlottesville Baroque Ensemble

The Daedalus Quartet
New York City, NY

The Industry
Los Angeles, CA

The Institute of Music for Children

The Kitchen
New York, NY

The Knights
New York, NY

The Time In Children’s Arts Initiative

the wulf.
Los Angeles, CA

Thingamajigs
Oakland, CA

JG Thirlwell
Brooklyn, NY

Suzanne Thorpe
San Diego, CA

Spencer Topel
Hanover, NH

Chris Tordini
Brooklyn, NY

Christopher Trapani
New York, NY

Trilogy:An opera company

Colin Tucker
Buffalo, NY

Ken Ueno
Berkeley, CA

Urban Bush Women
Brooklyn, NY

Vermont Performance Lab
Guilford, VT

Fernando Villa Proal

Volti
San Francisco, CA

Wake Forest University
Winston-Salem, NC

Michael Ward-Bergeman
New Orleans, LA

Joseph Waters

Laura Watts
Easton, PA

Jeff “Tain” Watts
Easton, PA

WBGO Jazz Radio 88.3 fm

WCV, Inc. / Wally Cardona
Brooklyn, NY

Kate Weare
Brooklyn, NY

Lee Weisert
Chapel Hill, NC

Dan Weiss
Brooklyn, NY

Tim Weiss

Richard Wesley

Wet Ink Ensemble
New York, NY

Philip White
Los Angeles, CA

Chris Wild

Amy Williams

Keith Witty
New York, NY

Cooper Wolken

Shara Worden
Detroit, MI

Lizz Wright

Wei-Han Wu
Rochester, NY

Yendor Productions

Rachel Yoder

Du Yun
New York, NY

Eva Zöllner

Digital to Analog: The Needle and Thread Running Through Technology
No Strings Attached: A Prism on the Saxophone Quartet

Singing It—Generations in Jazz

The Opposite of Brain Candy—Decoding Black MIDI

Musings on the Media

In search of Musical Integration Between the United States and the Rest of the Americas / En busca de
una integración musical entre Estados Unidos y el resto de las Américas

Digital to Analog: Plug and Play

A Reuniting Repertoire–The Guitar Music of Ernst Bacon

“This is My Design”

Psychedelic Citizenship: Jimi Hendrix as Tone Poet

Income, Expenses, and Mileage, Oh My! The Musician’s Guide to Reaching Organizational Nirvana In the New Year

The Banjo Faces Its Shadow

Thank You For Your Reply

Island Exports & Descendants Broaden Jazz Expressions

The Know-Nothings of Jazz

DarwinTunes and Cultural Reductionism

Mormon Music after the “Mormon Moment”

The Role Of College Teaching In The Life of A Creative Musician

Style Points

Trauma, Meaning, and The Quietest of Whispers

The Dangers of Secondhand Music

Who is Creative Placemaking? New Music, Integrity, and Community

Music Criticism is Broken and It’s All Your Fault

Hafez Modirzadeh: Crossing The Bridge

Melinda Wagner: It’s Just Who I Am

Jen Shyu: No More Sequined Dresses

Fay Victor: Opening Other Doors

Sheila Jordan: Music Saved My Life

Erik Friedlander: Stories Without Words

Samuel Adler: Knowing What You’re Doing

Miranda Cuckson: String Alchemist

Caroline Shaw: Yes, a Composer, but Perhaps not a Baker!

Gelsey Bell: Get a Little Closer

Jerome Kitzke: Stories That Must Be Told

Julian Wachner: Transcending the Sacred and the Profane

Daron Hagen: The Human Element

Ken Thomson: Energized Complexities

Paul Dresher: Intense Beauty, Visceral Energy, and Sonic Curiosity

Susan Alcorn: Fearless Slides

Laurie Spiegel: Grassroots Technologist

Lainie Fefferman: Strength In Numbers

Paola Prestini: Following Her Vision

Du Yun: No Safety Net

“Which of these Aaron Jay Kernises am I?”

Robert Honstein: Oblique Strategies

Jim Staley and His Home for New Music: Roulette @ 35

James Lee III: Don’t Miss a Chance

Pablo Ziegler: Making the Music Dance

Realizing Unrealized Projects

Advice from Strangers: Finding Your Own Strangers

Curation as a Third Possible Activity for Composers

Advice from Strangers: When Resources Are Low

Curation is Not a Form of Marketing

Advice from Strangers: A Path to Collaboration

New Music Needs Curators

Advice from Strangers: A Trust Recipe

Why I’m Not Getting a Doctorate

Advice from Strangers: The Craft of Community

Mantras & Filters: Overcoming Composer’s Block

Advice from Strangers: In Pursuit of Growth

Watching TV at Copland House

Now Hear This: NMBx Interviews Now On SoundCloud

Advice from Strangers: The Best of Two Worlds

On Not Composing

Selling Out is Not Selling Out

Student Debt is a Music Policy Issue

Friday Informer: Where Profanity Meets Art

In It to Win It: Lessons from the Long Game

Lost in Translation

Right Place, Right Time

Who Counts as an Expert?

What Have YOU Been Up To?

Jazz Remixes

There’s This Thing Happening: The New York Avant Garde Festival and Its Audience

Brahms’s Third Racket

FLUX-PIECE, FLUXCONCERT, FLUXFEST: Maciunas’s FluxFest Kit 2

Mad Fresh

Why Not Include the Bird—Tudorfest, 1964

Biting Breaks: Sampling and Ownership

It’s Music Because I Can Hear It: 1960s Experimental Music Festivals

Getting the Point

Be the First Follower

Dotting Dots

How to be While in Rehearsals

Decisions Made

Can’t See the Trees for the Forest at the 2015 Grammys

Advocating for New Music

Lessons Learned

What About Those Great American Symphonies?

Talking About Contemporary Music in a Helpful Way

Our Responsibility to the Next Generation

Blogging from Estonia: Creative Energy and New Perspectives

Rugged Individualism Meets the Orchestra—A Snapshot of the 2015 Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute

Eco-Music: Not Just a Theory

Helena Tulve: Trust, Discovery, and the Creative Process

Hoping To Hit a “Bird”: A Critical Analysis of the Phenomenon of Mentorship

Whose Job Is It To Teach Audience Experience?

Art and Environment: Connections, Community, and Being

THINGS HAVE GOT TO CHANGE!–Writing Political Music in Today’s World

New Music and Globalization 4: Archipelagos

Blogging from Estonia–A Search for Fresh Sounds

New Music Boxes: Wring Out the Old

Everything is real. There is no audience.

New Music and Globalization 3: Embodiment and Mobility

The Audience: More Than Money and Applause

This Year’s Model (or, That’s What They Don’t See)

New Music and Globalization 2: Networked Music

The Performer, the Audience, and the Measure of Success

New Music and Globalization, Part 1: Silk Road and Global Collaborations

Why I Make Music

Incarceration and Musical Inspiration Part Four: The Last Class

Classical Music Has Open Data Sets?

The Art of Doubting Myself

Incarceration and Musical Inspiration Part Three: A Live Concert in Prison

Listen To Music, Dammit!

Incarceration and Musical Inspiration Part Two: The Human Piano

There Is No Right Experience

Incarceration and Musical Inspiration Part One: Meeting the Men at Auburn’s Maximum Security Prison

Hindustani Music: The Four-Syllable Darling and Text Setting in Hindi

Disposable Spaces, Plastic Music

We Are Sitting In (Another) Room: Improv with Architecture

Hindustani Music: Cultural Collisions (and Washing Machines)

Music in a Time of Snapchat: Ephemeral Contexts

Hindustani Music: Let It Go

Monumental Listening

Hindustani Music: Recitals of Gratitude

Off the Trail: Absorbing the Reflection of the PCT

The T.A.R.D.I.S. of Opulence

Do You Hear the People Sing? Music and Protest in the Street

(Don’t) Leave it to Bieber

12 Things I’ve Learned from Church Music, Parts 10-12: Stick to Texts Even Though It’s All About the
Music…Actually, It Isn’t

The Dilemma of the “Postmodern Avant-Garde”

12 Things I’ve Learned from Church Music (Parts 7-9): Write Faster; Hear It, Change It; Churches Do Tons
of New Music

It Ain’t Us, Babe

12 Things I’ve Learned from Church Music, Parts 4-6: Make Them Sound Good, Follow the Rules, then Break
the Rules

The Musicology of the Present

Rethinking Grants: Sometimes Smaller is Bigger

12 Things I’ve Learned from Church Music Parts 1-3—Where You Are plus What and Who You Know

Back to School: Five Articles to Get the Semester Started Right

Unexpected Song

Location, Location

Dying From Exposure

What Are We Afraid Of?

The Media and the Message

Claire Chase and the Winner-Take-All Economy

New Music Opportunities for Young Students Grow in Missouri

When Entrepreneurship and Artistry Conflict

Finding a True Name in a Post-Genre World

Who’s Got a Question?

In Response: You’re an Artist AND an Entrepreneur

You’re an Artist, Not an Entrepreneur

The Improvisation Continuum

A Very Long Walk: Time, Distance, and Creativity on the PCT

On the Met Opera Lockout

A Feedback Loop of Movement and Sound: Five Questions with Choreographer Cori Marquis

An Rx for Improvisation

Why “Don’t Play for Free” Is Not Enough

What Lies Ahead For Teenage Composers?

Good Vibrations: Towards a Fair Trade Standard for Live Music

School’s Not Out for Summer

Advertising vs. Reality: Opera America Magazine Editor Responds

Of New Music and the 99%

Truth in Advertising

New Music USA Awards $287,050 to 54 Projects

One of Our Brothers as Well as a Bright Light—Remembering James Horner (1953-2015)

Compromise and Conviction at the National Composers Intensive

Beyond the Margins of Self

The Freedom Of A Bird In Flight – Ornette Coleman (1930-2015)

David Hertzberg Wins ACO’s Underwood Commission

Gunther Schuller Dies at 89

Follow the Bang on a Can Marathon and Make Music NY on NewMusicBox

2015 Paul Revere Awards & Other MPA Annual Meeting Highlights

2015 Composers Now Creative Residencies Announced

2015 Doris Duke Impact Awards Announced

Jazz Pioneer Ornette Coleman Dies at 85

Let Them Eat Non-Perishables: How ALIAS thrives by giving all its proceeds away

Celebrating New Music Awards Week

From Groupmuse to the BSO: Show-hopping in Boston

Killsonic: L.A.’s wild, war-painted musical incubator

Attend NewMusicBox LIVE on May 19

Julia Wolfe Wins 2015 Pulitzer Prize in Music

2015-2016 Rome Prize Recipients Announced

OPERA American Awards $100,000 to 7 Female Composers

Four Composers Chosen for 2nd Berkeley Symphony EarShot Readings

2015 Guggenheim Fellowship Awards Announced

Postcard from Pittsburgh: Contemporary Chamber Music Thrives in the Steel City

Missing the Gig: Remembering Clark Terry (1920-2015)

2015 Class of Doris Duke Artists Announced

ACO Announces Composers Chosen for Underwood Readings

ASCAP Announces 2015 Morton Gould Young Composer Award Winners

Remembering Tod Dockstader (1932-2015)

Aaron Jay Kernis to Direct New Nashville Symphony Composer Lab & Workshop

Robert Dick’s The Other Flute Mocked on Network TV

Remembering Ezra Laderman (1924-2015)

16 Composers Receive More Than $200K from American Academy of Arts and Letters

Remembering Tom McKinley (1938-2015): A Personal Reflection

Bobby Previte Awarded 2015 Greenfield Prize

American Composers Forum Announces 2015 Champions of New Music

2015 New Music Bake Sale Line-Up Announced

Come Away – Ezra Sims (1928-2015)

2015 ASCAP Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Awards Announced

Digital to Analog: Poems and Histories

Mason Bates Appointed Kennedy Center’s First Composer-In-Residence

The 2015 CMA/ASCAP Awards for Adventurous Programming and Other New Music at CMA

New Music USA Awards $284,250 to 62 Projects

Meeting of New Music Minds at SF Gathering

Chicago: The Spektral Quartet goes to pieces (and rots)

Mark Lanz Weiser Receives Nissim Prize

Spring For Music Has Second Life as SHIFT in Washington DC

New NEA Reports Crunch the Numbers on Culture

John Luther Adams Wins William Schuman Award

Eve Beglarian Wins 2015 Robert Rauschenberg Award

The Queen of Grace and Kindness—Deborah Atherton (1951-2014)

Corigliano and Over 130 Other Music Creators Honored at ASCAP Foundation Awards

Violinist Mark Sokol—American Music Advocate (1946-2014)

57th Annual Grammy Award Nominations Announced

Boston: Passports and Layovers from Lorelei and Roomful of Teeth

Musical America Honors NMBx Regional Editor with “Profile in Courage”

Fromm Foundation Announces 2014 Commissions

Happy Birthday, Adolphe Sax!

John Luther Adams Named Musical America’s 2015 Composer of the Year

Intense, Hardworking and Fun Loving—Remembering Stephen Paulus (1949-2014)

ACF Announces 2014 JFund Awardees

Chicago: A scavenger hunt of world premieres

League of American Orchestras & New Music USA Announce 12 New Music Alive Residencies

Getting Past Difficult Pronunciations to Answering Some Difficult Questions—the 2014 ISCM World Music
Days

Boston: A Fight for Love and Glory—Pipeline! at 25

Three Musicians Among 2014 USA Fellows

Chicago: The Unbearable Intimacy of Wandelweiser

Boosey & Hawkes Signs David T. Little

Two Women Composers Commissioned in New League/EarShot Program

Open Letter from American Composers to Atlanta Symphony

Chicago: Enter the Dollhouse—Colombine’s Paradise Theatre

Steve Coleman Awarded 2014 MacArthur “Genius Grant”

A Peek from the Peaks of the PROs

Chicago: Hiking the Song Path, hearing music everywhere

2014 Barlow Winners Announced

New Music USA Requesting Feedback on Project Grants

British Report on Commissioning Fees Inspires Concern

All Up In Your Space: Billie Howard on How Artists Live

Washington National Opera to Mount 3 New 20-Minute Operas

New Foundation Will Support Performance and Commissioning of American Music

Todd Lerew Wins the 2014 ACF National Composition Contest

Richard Toensing (1940-2014)—“The Oak Doesn’t Grow as Fast as the Squash”

Tanglewood: Sessions and Lessons on Successful Composition

Loudness Isn’t What It Used to Be: Southland Ensemble and Robert Ashley

Charlie Haden (1937-2014)—One of the Greatest

Visconti Chosen as California Symphony Young American Composer-in-Residence

Remembering Seymour Barab (1921-2014): Composer, Cellist, Friend

Mary Rodgers (1931-2014): A Woman of Many Talents

New Music USA Awards $311,000 to Artists

American Lyric Theater

Arts for Art

Bearthoven

Emsemble Pampelmousse

Harvestworks

Jack Arts Inc.

JACK Quartet

Loadbang

Look + Listen

Mivos Quartet

MATA

PRISM Quartet Inc.

Publiquartet

Righteousgirls

So Percussion

Sybarite5

Talea Ensemble

Talujon

The Jazz Gallery

Thingny

Wet Ink Ensemble

Yarn/Wire

YMusic

Julia Adolphe

Anahid Ajemian

Eugene Birman

Carla Bley

Emily Bookwalter

Roger Bourland

Daphne Carr

Ted Chapin

Mark Clague

Kevin Clark

Bradley Colten

October Crifasi

Brian Current

Rob Deemer

Kevin Erickson

Reena Esmail

Nat Evans

Eddy Ficklin

Robert Fink

Álvaro Gallegos

Emily Green

Jeremy Grimshaw

Matthew Guerrieri

Trevor Gureckis

David Harrington

Ethan Hein

Aaron Holloway-Nahum

Megan Ihnen

Marie Incontrera

Willard Jenkins

Dan Joseph

George Grella Jr

Linda Kernohan

Kristin Kuster

Libby Larsen

R. Andrew Lee

Shaya Lyon

Payton MacDonald

Marcus McLaurine

Ellen McSweeney

Matt Mendez

Dean C. Minderman

Theodore Mook

Nick Norton

Frank J. Oteri

Joan Arnau Pàmies

Sam Reising

Will Roseliep

Marc Rossi

Mikel Rouse

Tim Rutherford-Johnson

Isaac Schankler

Isaac Schankler

Heidi Schaul-Yoder

Caitlin Schmid

Garrett Schumann

Alex Shapiro

Molly Sheridan

Daniel Siepmann

Matthew Sigman

Sara Sitzer

Kile Smith

Erik Spangler

NewMusicBox Staff

Heather Stebbins

Tom Steenland

Debbie Steinglass

David Stock

Jamaaladeen Tacuma

Dale Trumbore

Jenny Undercofler

Matt Walker

Nate Wooley

Brittain Ashford

Byron Au Yong

Harrison Bankhead

Stacey Barelos

Dan Becker

Sidra Bell

Suzanne Bocanegra

Samantha Boshnack

Heather Buchman

Stephen Burns

Sara Carina Graef

Natalie Chami

Ananya Chatterjea

Gloria Cheng

Brian Chin

Chris Cogburn

Anthony Cornicello

Michael Daugherty

Brent Michael Davids

Amy Denio

Jeff Denson

Mario Diaz de Leon

Natacha Diels

Cornelius Eady

Jennifer Edwards

Liberty Ellman

Marti Epstein

Katie Faulkner

David First

Ellen Fullman

Karen Galvin

Sheetal Gandhi

Orlando Jacinto Garcia

Janice Garrett

Paul Geluso

Gina Gibney

Christine Goodman

Nathan Hanson

Dan Hart

Stephen Hartke

David Heuser

Jonathan Bailey Holland

Cynthia Hopkins

CHIA YU HSU

Geoffrey Hudson

Jenny Olivia Johnson

Galen Joseph-Hunter

Daniel Kellogg

Michael Korie

Robert Kyr

William Lackey

James Lee

Sasha Leitman

Todd Lerew

Erica Lindsay

David Liptak

David Ludwig

Mary Mackenzie

Rudresh Mahanthappa

Ben Makino

Lou Mallozzi

Gesel Mason

Sally McCune

Justin Merritt

Lisa Mezzacappa

Brent Miller

John Musto

Eric Nathan

Keir Neuringer

Kevin Noe

Mark Olivieri

Aaron Parks

Forrest Pierce

Lauren Radnofsky

Jon Raskin

Jacob Richman

Steven Ricks

Pierre Ruhe

Laurie San Martin

Carl Schimmel

Micah Silver

Stephanie Skura

Sydney Skybetter

D. J. Sparr

Laura Steenberge

Mimi Stillman

Rhonda Taylor

Dan Tepfer

Anthony Tidd

Spencer Topel

Maggie Vail

Doug Varone

Wayne Wallace

Ashley Walters

Noah Stern Weber

Dana Wilson

Clara Yang

ENDOWMENT

 

Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust

The Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Inc.

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

Baisley Powell Elebash Fund

The Ford Foundation

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The National Endowment for the Arts

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund

The Helen F. Whitaker Fund

Anonymous

INSTITUTIONS

$100,000+

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Booth Ferris Foundation

The Mary Flager Cary Charitable Trust

The New York State Council on the Arts

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

The Scherman Foundation

$50,000-99,999

The Aaron Copland Fund

The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

MailChimp

The National Endowment for the Arts

The Alice M. Ditson Fund

$10,000-$24,999

The Amphion Foundation

The Francis Goelet Trust

The Getty Foundation

The Reed Foundation

$3,000-$9,999

ASCAP Corporation

The ASCAP Foundation

The Fan Fox and Leslie Samuels Foundation

The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts

$1,500-$2,999

The Rodgers and Hammerstein Foundation

$1,000-$1,499

BMI Corporation

The BMI Foundation

COMPOSERS LEADERSHIP CIRCLE

Leaders ($5,000+)

John Adams

John Harbison

Steve Stucky

Advocates ($2,000 -$4,999)

Dan Godfrey

Augusta Read Thomas
In honor of James Kendrick, Kristin Lancino, Frances Richard, and Steven Stucky

Endorsers ($500-$1,999)

John Luther Adams

Samuel Adler

Daniel Asia

Donald Crockett

Michael Daugherty

Joel Harrison

Stephen Hartke

Jake Heggie

Jennifer Higdon

Pierre Jalbert

Lori Laitman

David Liptak

David Ludwig

Beata Moon

Robert Paterson

Shulamit Ran

Steve Reich

Michael Schelle

Elliott Schwartz

Laura Schwendinger

Alex Shapiro

Judith Shatin

Donald Walker

Dan Welcher

Anonymous

Individuals

$10,000+

Tom Brenner

Dorothea Endicott

Alan Kornberg

Frederick Peters

Justus and Elizabeth Schlichting

Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

Cece Wasserman (The Cheswatyr Foundation)

$3,000-$9,999

NancyBell Coe

Timothy Gallagher

Harriet Kaufman

Marya Martin and Kenneth Davidson

A Slade and Phyllis Mills

Barbara A. Petersen

Esa-Pekka Salonen

$1,200-$2,999

Arts Federation

Michael Embler and Maria Cilenti

The Counterpoint Fund

Mr. Edward Harsh

Kristin and Thierry Lancino

Gayle Morgan

Linda and Stuart Nelson

Jim and Warrie Price

Frances Richard

Paul Sperry

Dr. Carol and David Zale

Michel and Caroline Zaleski

$600-$1,199

Dr. Rae Alexander-Minter

Toni and Seth Bernstein

Mrs. Helen Coyner

Mr. Anthony Creamer

Leslie Kandell

Thomas L. Kempner Jr.

Mr. James Kendrick

Richard and Karen LeFrak

Elyse Montiel

Mr. Thomas W. Morris

Steven and Brenda Schick

Mr. Elliott Schwartz

Ms. Deborah Steinglass

Matias Tarnopolsky

Ms. Cia Toscanini

$300-$599

Samuel Adler

Rhoda Baruch

Mr. and Mrs. Astrid and John Baumgardner

Theodore and Joanna Chapin

Yi and Zhou Long Chen

Ms. Susan Cheng

Mr. Anthony Creamer

Ms. Susan Feder and Todd Gordon

Mitch Gillette

David Indyke

Mattie Kaiser

Mr. and Mrs. Barry and Sally Mandel

Mr. David Alan Miller

Martin and Lucy Miller Murray

Frank J. Oteri

Amy and Robert Poster

Frank Proto

Dr. Michael Schelle

Jennifer Wada

Dr. and Mrs. Alex and Audry Weintrob

Ms. Judith Lang Zaimont

$120-$299

Dan Anastasio

T.J. Anderson

Robert and Linda Attiyeh

Dan Becker

Dr. Nancy Bogen

David Borden

Mr. Seth Bousted

Seth Brenzel

Joanne Hubbard Cossa

Phyllis Farley

Peter Golub

Joel Harrison

Ms. Lydia Kontos

Paul and Toby Koren

Pascal Le Boeuf

Mr. Richard LeSueur

Mrs. Catherine Leuning

Mr. Ed Matthew

Dr. Sasha Matson

Greg Mays

Mr. Harold Meltzer

Maury Newburger

Mr. Marc Ostrow

Ms. Vivian Perlis

Mr. Daniel J. Perlongo

Stanislaw Skrowaczewski

Ann and Dick Sullivan

Robert Sutherland

Lawrence Tarlow

Matthew Welch

Gernot Wolfgang

Zhou Long and Chen Yi

Wes York and Bob Scrofani

$60-$119

Roger M. Aldridge

Mr. Greg Allen

Mr. Bill Alves

Lawrence Axelrod

Mr. David Balakrishnan

Mrs. Lilian Barbash

Ms. Carol Barnett

Nancy Barry

Ms. Eve Beglarian

Ms. Elizabeth Bell

William Hayes Biggs

David Bloom

William Bolcom and Joan Morris

David Briggs

Allen Brings

Mr. Philip C. Brunelle

Doranne Croon Cedillo

Ms. Gloria Cheng

Mr. Wesley A. Clark

Noah Creshevsky

Mr. Conrad Cummings

Andrew Cyr

J-P Douglas

Ms. Mary DuPree

Mr. Paul A. Epstein

John Evans

Peter Golub

Mr. Ralph Grierson

Lucille Herbert

MaestroThomas Hampson

Mr. Samuel H. Hope

Stephen Jaffe

Judith Kellock

Ms. Laura Kaminsky

Ms. Jessica Krash

Ms. Tania Leon

Sharan Leventhal

Arthur Levering

Mrs. Nancy B. Loeffler

Clara Longstreth

Ed Matthew

Ms. Janice Misurell-Mitchell

John Neuchterlein

Ms. Ursula Oppens

Vera Parkin

Paul Dresher Ensemble/Musical Traditions

Neva Pilgrim

Jayn Rosenfeld

Mr. Peter Rubardt

Mr. Anthony W. Schuman

Ms. Lucy A. Shelton

Gerald Starlight

Dawn Upshaw

Libby Van Cleve and Jack Vees

Mark Winges

Elizabeth Wood

Yehudi Wyner

$1-$59

Mr. Gregory Beyer

Emily Bookwalter

Ms. Kim Braun

Mr. Thomas D. Brosh

Lydia Busler

Luke Cissell

Ms. Nancy S. Clarke

Mr. Kenneth Deveney

Richard Einhorn

Sivan Eldar

Kathryn Engelhardt

Dr. Marti Epstein

Ms. Jan Faidley

Ms. Joanne Feltman

Dr. Lyudmila German

James Ginsberg and Patrice Michaels

Jake Goodman

Mr. William Holab

Ms. Debra Kaye

Harold Lichtin

Alanna Maharajh

Lucy Mattingly

William Merrill

Network for Good

Ed Osborn

Tristan and Lesley Perich

Mr. Mark W. Phillips

Kala Pierson

Janese Quitugua

Ms. Erin Rogers

Julie Sandler-Friedman

Nanette Shannon

Mr. Allen Shearer

Jane Sheldon

Mr. Sean Shepherd

J. Sloan

Thomas Steeland

Andrew Steifel

David Stock

John Toenjes

Mr. Steven Tintweiss

Dr. Aleksandra Vebrelov

Mr. Gregory R. Wanamaker

Gail Wein

Anna Williams

Roger Zahab

Mr. John Zielinski

 

“People Power” – The Communal Ethos of Satyagraha

…But I Hate Modern Music

[Title]

10 American Composers’ Works Chosen for 2016 Ars Electronica Forum in Switzerland

12 Composers Among the 178 Guggenheim Fellows for 2016

2015 Koussevitzky Commissions Announced

2016 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award Recipients Announced

2016 Doris Duke Artist Awards Announced

2016 NEA Jazz Masters Announced

2016 Pew Arts Grants Announced

2017 NEA Jazz Masters Fellows Announced

64th Annual BMI Student Composer Award Winners Announced

A Few Things I Failed to Mention

A Letter to Leslie Bassett (1923-2016)

A Tribute to Jed Speare, Composer and Phonographer (1954-2016)

A Week in Havana

About Those 2016 Grammy Nominations

ACF Announces 2016 Champion of New Music Awards

Adams’s Become Ocean Inspires Taylor Swift to Make $50K Gift

After One Ear

American Academy of Arts and Letters Announces 2016 Music Awards Totaling Over $200K

American Academy of Arts and Letters Announces Winners of Vocal Composition Prizes Totalling $90K

An Atheist Composer on Choral Music

An Ode to Community

AndrΓ Previn: How Lucky I Am Now

Andy Milne on Star Trek

Andy Milne: Putting the Theory Into Practice

Are Transformative Fair Use Principles Foul to Musicians?

Are Unions Relevant to New Music?

Arto Lindsay: Space, Parades, and Confrontational Aesthetics

Bernd Klug: traces of [dis]location

Better Know a Composer: Disambiguation Edition

Bridging Gastronomy and Art Requires Making Connections

Build the Playground: Carolyn O’Brien on composing through depression

Cabrillo and the Post-Alsopian Future

Celebrating John Duffy with Music and Memories

Chamber Music America Announces $483,000 in Grants for New Works

Choosing the Three-Letter Response Over the Two-Letter One

Classical and Contemporary Cambodian Music and Dance

Classical and New Music Culture in Taiwan

Close Listening: Music and Genre

Close Listening: Music and Power

Close Listening: Music and Race

Close Listening: Music and Us

Commissioning Fees Calculator

Communal Experimentalism in the Sixties: The Pulsa Group

Complex but Emotional–Remembering Ursula Mamlok (1923-2016)

Complicity and the Chemical Senses

Composer Advocacy Notebook: A Tale of Three Cities

Composers, Performers, and Consent

Composing Advocacy: Social Voices

Composing is a Lonely Craft, but We Can’t Do It Alone

Con vibrato ma non troppo: Rethinking Sopranos

Congrats to the 2016 Grammy Award Winners

Copyright Conundrums for Collaborators

Courting the “Lay” Listener

Creating Points of Entry Into Opera Through Video

Creation is Messy

Cultivating a Sense of Belonging: Our Debate over Electroacoustic Music Terminology

Daniel Wohl: The Seamless Ideal

Define Inspiration

Do Candidates Have the Right to Conscript Songs for Political Purposes?

Do You Have the Chutzpah to Take a Gamble on Fair Use?

Electroacoustic Music is Not About Sound

Electroacoustic Music with Video: Comparison with Sound for Film

Enthusiastic, Shy, Quirky and Brilliant: Remembering John Eaton (1935-2015)

Five Takeaways from the Conversation on Female Composers

Forging Institutional Networks through BAM’s Next Wave Festival

Foundation for Contemporary Arts Announces 2016 Award Recipients

Four Emerging Composers’ Works Premiere in Columbus Through EarShot

Get Vulnerable

Good Career Hunting: On Being a Deer Chaser

Good Old-Fashioned Human-to-Human Connection on a Very Honest Level

Got a Question? Get Answers on Twitter #MUSOCHAT

Hamilton Creator Lin-Manuel Miranda Named 2015 MacArthur Fellow

He Knew Everything and Everyone–Remembering David Stock (1939-2015)

Henry Threadgill wins 2016 Pulitzer Prize in Music

Homage to Captain Swing

How Landscape Music Evokes the Natural World

I don’t have to choose, do I?

ICE Hires New Executive Director

If the Medium Is the Message, Then Who Should Sing It?

Imagining Community at Bang on a Can’s First Marathon

Improvising With the Instrument, Not Just On It – A Remembrance of Paul Bley (1932-2016)

In The Absence of Money

Indeterminacy 2.0: How to Burn Your Harpsichord

Indeterminacy 2.0: In Which We Agonize Over Terminology

Indeterminacy 2.0: The Music of Catastrophe

Indeterminacy 2.0: Under the Hood

Interview with Daniel Spreadbury of Dorico

It’s a Floor Wax and a Dessert Topping

It’s Difficult to be a World Showcase with Limited Resources: The 2015 ISCM World Music Days

James Moore: The Hunt for Sonic Solutions

Jessie Montgomery: Conjuring Memories

John King: It All Becomes Music

Jonathan Berger and Christopher Trapani Win 2016 Rome Prize

Kate Soper: Real Communication

Lessons from the Outside: A Venture Capital Firm for New Music

Linda Oh: Lean In and Listen

Listening to Labor in the “Little Cities of Black Diamonds”

Loving the Lottery: Arts Funding for the Unfunded

MacArthur’s Creative and Effective Institutions and Bielecki Foundation Awards Announced

Maintaining a Creative Life: New Orleans Edition

Making It: Music and Money

Manifesting Community in Early Minimalism

Mary Ellen Childs: Engaging All the Senses

Mary Ellen Childs: On Merging Sound and Scent

Mary Jane Leach: Sonic Confessions

Memories of Milton

Michael Jackson-Themed Orchestra Piece Wins ASCAP Nissim Prize

Missy Mazzoli: Communication, Intimacy, and Vulnerability

Mister, Make Me a… Song?

Money, Support, and the Voice of New Music

Muhal Richard Abrams: Think All, Focus One

Music After Life: Guiding Lights

Music After Life: Posthumous Lessons

Music After Life: Searching for Survival

Music After Life: Twists of Fate

Music Inspired by Visual Art

Music is So Flippin’ Hard: Adversity Training for Musicians

Music Publishers Association Announces 2016 Paul Revere Awards

Musical America Announces Recipients of Its 2016 Awards

Musicians at Work: Ensemble Residencies as Social Relationships

My Neck, My Back: Composing through PTSD and Chronic Pain

New Detroit Symphony Streaming Service Filled with New Music

New Music and Place: Creating Community

New Music as Advocacy for Place

New Music for Chinese Instruments

New Music for Learning

New Music Gathering 2016 Schedule Posted

New Music Is Not (Necessarily) Contemporary Music

New Music on Vinyl: Everybody Loves It, But It Doesn’t Make Much Sense

New Music USA Announces the Inaugural Impact Fund Cohort

New Music USA Awards $276,770 to 53 Projects

New Music USA Awards $310,820 to 60 Projects

New Music USA’s Six Submissions to the 2016 ISCM World Music Days

New Music: A Product of Modernity (and Capitalism)

NewMusicBox LIVE! presents Gabriel Kahane

NewMusicBox LIVE! Presents Joan Tower

NewMusicBox LIVE! presents Matana Roberts

NewMusicBox Mix: 2015 Staff Picks

Now Streaming on a Device Near You: New Music Playlists

NYFA and EtM Announce Fellowships and Residencies to NY Composers

One Year as a Composer, Computer Musician, and Teacher in Taiwan

Opera Philadelphia Names Rene Orth 6th Composer in Residence

Overthinking Genre

Para-composition

Paul Moravec: The Whole Range of Human Emotion

Positive Power: Develop the Growth Mindset of Success

Power of the Project-Based Life

Productivity, Pressure, and the Power of Listening: Marcos Balter

Pursuing Diversity: New Voices, New Sounds

Queer and Loathing in Las Vegas: Performing Community in Hagen’s Vera

Raindrops Keep Falling on my Head

Remembering Composer and MTC Founder John Duffy (1926-2015)

Remembering Steven Stucky (1949-2016)

Roundtable: Facing the Hard Questions

Roundtable: Let’s Make a List

Roundtable: The Bonnie Jones Grant

Royce Vavrek: So Many Juicy, Amazing Words

Rudresh Mahanthappa: Getting To Know Who I Am

Saad Haddad: It’s Not Going to Be Exact

Sarah Kirkland Snider: The Full 360

Seven Musicians Are Among the 37 New USA Fellows Announced for 2015

Should Composers Read Music Critics?

Six Emerging Composers Chosen for All-Scholarship Program at Copland House

Sixteen Jazz Composers’ Works to be Performed by Three Orchestras

Songs by David Lang and J. Ralph Denied Oscar Performance

Sonic Uprising: Songs for Freddie Gray

Sounds Heard’Liaisons: Re-Imaging Sondheim from the Piano

Space Matters: A Call for Community Action

Spreadsheets and Skeptics: a philosophical tale of data and music

Stay Tuned: Celebrating Ben Johnston’s 90th Birthday with his 10 String Quartets

Steve Reich Awarded 2016 Nemmers Prize

Steven Stucky (1949-2016)

Still B.A. After All These Years

Stream the 2016 Bang on a Can Marathon

Structural and Playback Issues in Current Electroacoustic Music

Summer Rewind: 10 Posts To Read Again

Tasting Notes

Tempering My Friends Anxiety and Doubt

The Best and Worst Thing: A conversation with Keeril Makan and Daniel Felsenfeld

The Case for Radio

The Cistern Chapel: Resonance from the Pacific Northwest

The Defeat of New Music

The Forgotten Man: Teo Macero and Bitches Brew

The Gathering Storm: How We Made a Conference

The Generalization Generation

The Long and Winding Road

The Opportunity of Electroacoustic Musicology

The Pun is Mightier than the Portmanteau

The Rush of Performing vs. Merely Being a Witness

The Slow Listening Revolution

The Wizards of New Music: Reflections on the 2016 ISCM World Music Days

Thirteen Emerging Composers Will Participate in Two of USA’s Most Prestigious Orchestra Programs

This Week: Musical Creativity and Mental Health

Timbre, Envelope and Variation in Electroacoustic Music

Tony Conrad (1940-2016): Writing “Minor” History

Towards The Future: New Music in the 21st Century

Tracing Influence

Two American Composers Among Five Chosen for Gaudeamus Shortlist

Unbroken Art

Vertical Performance

Vinfonies, Nessun Dorma, and Gastromorphology

We Need More (On-Demand) Films of New Operas

What 4’33” Teaches Us

What Are You Trying to Decide in Your Career?

What I Didn’t Learn in Music School

What to Ware? A Guide to Today’s Technological Wardrobe

When Do I Get to Stop Exposing Myself?

Where Is Do?

Whose Classical Music? Assumptions and Representation in Online Participatory Projects

Why Landscape Music is More Important Than Ever

Why Pastiche Has Taken Over Music

William G. Baumol and You: (Broader Economic) Context Is Everything

Winning the Lottery

Words After Music: Stories from the Archive

Total Revenue :
$2,489,462

Total Expenses :
$2,476,460
(including $990,327 in grants to the field)

Endowment value as of 6/30/15:
$16,958,072

Jeff Arnal

Astrid Baumgardner

Lisa Bielawa

Robert Carl

Eric Chasalow

Brian Chin

Kevin Clark

Nicolas Collins

Andy Costello

Christopher DeLaurenti

Gahlord Dewald

Jeff Dunn

Ryan Ebright

Ray Evanoff

Nat Evans

Lainie Fefferman

Daniel Felsenfeld

Eddy Ficklin

Ruby Fulton

Lee Gardner

Aaron Gervais

Jeremy Gill

Carol Goss

George Grella Jr

Matthew Guerrieri

Gretta Harley

Brian Harnetty

Ed Harsh

Joanna Helms

Sam Hillmer

Emily E. Hogstad

Ben Houge

Jenny Olivia Johnson

Bonnie Jones

Susan Kander

Kenneth Kirschner

Judith Kogan

Mary Kouyoumdjian

R. Andrew Lee

Gabriela Lena Frank

Shaya Lyon

Matt Marks

Ellen McSweeney

Sasha Metcalf

Imani Mosley

Patrick Nickleson

Kerry O’Brien

Marc D. Ostrow

Frank J. Oteri

Joan Arnau Pàmies

Rachel Peters

John Pippen

Alba Potes

Sam Reising

Will Robin

Christopher Rouse

Christina Rusnak

Isaac Schankler

Eric Segnitz

Alex Shapiro

Nell Shaw Cohen

Molly Sheridan

Alice Shields

Maggie Stapleton

Jim Stephenson

Jacob David Sudol

John Supko and Jeffrey Edelstein

Alex Temple

Mari Valverde

Melinda Wagner

Maia Jasper White

Meg Wilhoite

Randall Woolf and Kathleen Supové

NEWMUSICBOX ARTICLES 2013–2014

When Sunny Gets Blue—Remembering Harold Shapero (1920-2013)

Stacy Garrop: With a Story to Tell

Sounds Heard: Luke Cissell—Cosmography

The Mush Race of Boston: The SICPP 2013 Iditarod

April 2013 Composer Assistance Program Awardees Announced

What Do You Sound Like, and Where Are You Going?–Thoughts from the 2013 June in Buffalo Festival

Austin Summer Festivals: Business as Unusual

Back on the Road

Winners and Losers

Harbison Receives BSO’s Horblit Award

On the Road with Mischa Zupko

Sounds Heard: Christine Southworth—String Quartets

Wearing Two Hats: Stewart Copeland on Playing and Composing

Derivative Works

Manufactured Innocence

Acknowledging the Rhino: Talking Art In a Capitalist World

End of the Road

Words of Encouragement

Submission, Discomfort, and Transcendence

Mark Adamo’s The Gospel of Mary Magdalene

Sounds Heard: Rzewski, Tenney, Parkins—Music for String Quartet and Percussion

Paula Matthusen: Attention to Light

New England’s Prospect: Babylon Revisited

Five Lessons American Musicians Can Learn From Guildhall’s Music Leadership Program

Cable Comparisons

Back in the Apple

Join The Chorus

Sounds Heard: Daniel Wohl—Corps Exquis

Newly Launched Composer Subscription Service Offers Alternative Publishing Model

Shape Notes, Billings, and American Modernisms

New England’s Prospect: Arlene Sierra at Yellow Barn

Austin Chamber Music Center Summer Festival: Victoire and Pride

A Hot Time in the Old Town

Big Picture

Laterna Magica

I’m a Trans Composer. What the Hell Does That Mean?

Wanted: Local Bay Area Musicians

A Wholly Factual Account of a Failed Attempt to Transcend Gender Through Electroacoustic Musical Theatre

Sounds Heard: Jacqueline Humbert and David Rosenboom—Daytime Viewing

Carman Moore: Curiosity Is the Strongest Engine

Up Against the Ceiling

It’s Not Carved in Stone

No Place Like This—The 2013 Mizzou International Composers’ Festival

New England’s Prospect: All-Lou Harrison Concert At Monadnock Music

Sounds Heard: Brooklyn Rider—A Walking Fire

The Second Performance and Beyond

In the Bay Area: Cahill at the Piano and Music@Menlo

Forest for the Trees

Delay Is Denial

The Numbers Game

Sounds Heard: Rebekah Heller—100 names

Listening to the Unknown

Caleb Burhans: Inner Voices

Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival: A Sandbox of Sounds

A Category of Our Own

Copy Rites

It’s Always Now

Grant Enables Major Expansion of American Lyric Theater’s Composer Librettist Development Program

New England’s Prospect: The Manicured Lawns (Tanglewood’s Festival of Contemporary Music)

Sounds Heard: In the Mood for a Melody (Piano Person Edition)

New Music USA Announces More Than $1.2M in New Grants

Your 2013-14 Attitude Guide: Four to Cop, Four to Drop for an Amazing Season

Music is Music: The 2013 PARMA Music Festival

Turn Out the Stars

Composing and Responsibility

Wellesley Composers Conference and Chamber Music Center

NewMusicBox Mix: The Jazz Edition

Judged By Its Cover

On Repetition

Preparing for Takeoff

Narong Prangcharoen Wins $15K 2013 Barlow Prize

Lest We Forget

Friends

Derek Bermel: Context is Key

Sound Heard: Mark Gustavson— Dissolving Images

Two Strains

The Smithsonian Institute Blues

Solidarity Revisited

For Even the “Most Stupid Persons”

Sounds Heard: The Disquiet

Junto Food Opera: Merging Taste and Sound in Real Time

Stockhausen and Terror

The Travis Weller Instrumentarium

9/11 – Jazz

Never the Same Twice

Sounds Heard: Blowing In The Wind (Flute Edition)

Iron Composer 2013

Kenneth Kirschner: Pirate This Music

Space Age Synths

Perceptions of Success

Thoughts of Mainstream

Inviting Possibilities for New Music and Music Education

How We Learn Now: Education Week

Andrew Norman Joins Opera Philadelphia as Third Composer in Residence

Notes From the Other Side of the Desk

Sounds Heard (Historical Edition): Henry Brant—Young People’s Records

Vijay Iyer and Jeremy Denk Among 2013 MacArthur Fellows

Music, MOOCs, and Copyright: Digital Dilemmas for Schools of Music

Unteaching

Speaking of Which: Musical Expression in a Foreign Language

Reflections on Liberal Arts and Late Bloomers

Austin Soundwaves: A Challenge Like Nothing Else

On Lying To My Students

Hail to Thee, and Sing Out!

Jazz in Education

The World Beyond the Classroom: SFCM Nurtures Community Creativity and Optimism

Standards and Creativity

Learn How To Learn How To Learn: On Being a Self- Taught and a Non-Self-Taught Composer

Kernis Resigns from Minnesota Orchestra

Morton Subotnick: The Mad Scientist in the Laboratory of the Ecstatic Moment

The Medium

Controlling the Catalogue

Culture Counter Culture

It Isn’t Over Because “the Fat Lady Wasn’t Singing”

Diligence is to Magic as Progress is to Flight

Sounds Heard: Noah Creshevsky—The Four Seasons

New Music USA’s Project Grants Are Now Open

Copland House Announces 2013 Residency Awards

You Used to Like Terrible Music

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 2
Can We Move Past Post-Race, Already?

Ostrava 2013

Sounds Heard: Erik Friedlander—Claws and Wings

After Einstein

Morton Subotnick’s Sidewinder

From the Shed to the Stars: Reflections on the Boston University Tanglewood Institute

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 3

Wonder and Magic

Music is the Gateway Drug to Listening

Sounds Heard: Make It Big (Large Ensemble Edition)

Van-Anh Vanessa Vo: Old Sounds / New Music

Double Trio: line upon line and Konk Pack

Revise THIS!

Culture Counter Culture, Pt. 4

Competitive Nature

Making It Matter

Gloriously Messy Lodging:Zappa’s 200 Motels

Sounds Heard: Florestan Recital Project—Early Songs of Samuel Barber

Alone At The Top: What Conductor Susanna Malkki’s Success Means—and What It Doesn’t

Stayin’ Alive: Preserving Electroacoustic Music Culture

Laura Kaminsky: Every Place Has a Story

Creative Partners in the Work of Life

Every Place is a Musical Capital

SoundSpace: Graphic Notation

Sounds Heard: Taylor Ho Bynum—Navigation

#Yeezus: Lessons in Contemporary Performance from the Stadium Set

Lou Reed Got Married and He Didn’t Invite Me

Cage’s (More Than) Ten Thousand Things

Finally, Movement on the Notation Front

Culture Counter Culture Pt. 5

Guided By Sound: Crissy Broadcast Debuts in San Francisco

New England’s Prospect: Celebrating Ned Rorem @90 in Boston

Sounds Heard: Alvin Lucier—Orchestra Works

Jamie Baum: Jazz Diplomacy

In Memoriam: Arnold Rosner (1945-2013)

Mixed Media: Collaborative Music and Visual Art Making for Ten x Ten: 2013

Cultured?

A Chance to %@#$! Around

New England’s Prospect: Anniversary Waltzes—Kronos @ 40 in Providence

Fear of Simplicity

Audience Cultivation In American New Music

It Takes a Village: Daron Hagen’s A Woman in Morocco

Cultured, Part 2

A View Behind the Curtain

New England’s Prospect: The Second Hand Unwinds—A 45th Season for Boston Musica Viva

Sounds Heard: Computer-Assisted

From Darmstadt to the Shopping Mall

Other Guitars

Invisible Cities: Choose Your Own Opera

University of Louisville Announces 2014 $100K Grawemeyer Music Prize

Dan Trueman: Man Out of Time

In and Out of Jetlag

Sounds Heard: Spektral Quartet—Chambers

100 Guitars Rock West Coast Premiere of Rhys Chatham’s A Secret Rose Music for Angelenos, by
Angelenos

If Elton John Sings But Everyone Else Does Too, Does It Make a Sound?

Culture, The End.

Common Ground

Some Additional 2014 Grammy Nominations

Fair and Balanced

Sounds Heard: Alvin Lucier—Still and Moving Lines

Digital Audio Workstations: Notation and Engagement Reconsidered

Competition Fees: How Much is Too Much?

A Point of Culture

2013 ASCAP Foundation Awards Announced

To Jury or Not to Jury

All Venues Great and Small

Rhythm and Restlessness

Remembering Jim Hall (1930-2013)

NewMusicBox Mix: 2013 Staff Picks

Sweeter Music and High Art

New Music Boxes: Another Year’s Gone By

Carolyn O’Brien: Making Music as Tactile as Possible

Paul Rudy: Life Improvisations

Happy Holidays

Out of Network

Jingle Those Bells

New England’s Prospect: May All Your Christmases Be Weird

Lisa Bielawa: Fire Starter

A Drone Too Long

The Audience is the Most Important Instrument

Three Words for 2014: Chicago Musicians Reflect and Aspire in the New Year

Noise Reduction

The Mutual Benefit Balance

Sounds Heard: Zevious—Passing Through the Wall

The Entertainer

What Counts as Borrowed Material?

Evolving the Old, Inviting the New

Making New (New) Music

Henri Lazarof (1932-2013), Who Dominated My Life for Six Years

Sounds Heard: Some American Albums

Eric Nathan: Making It as Clear as Possible

Always Something New—Remembering Yusef Lateef(1920-2013)

How To Be Culturally Relevant

Creative Thinking Biases

An Expanding Paradigm

Sounds Heard: Ingram Marshall and Jim Bengston—Alcatraz and Eberbach

The Shame Of Poverty And Investing In The Future

Finalists in 2014 American Composers Forum National Composition Contest Announced

The Appropriation Problem

Finding the Right Balance

New England’s Prospect: Fellow Travelers “Sometimes” Music

New England’s Prospect: Three World Premieres in Wildly Disparate Styles

Sounds Heard: Duo Scordatura, The Act of Loving You, and Ritual

A Master Communicator: Remembering H. Owen Reed (1910-2014)

History Of The World

What Would Grammys Look Like in a Genre-Less World?

Andrew Norman: Empowering Performance

Soul of the Nation

Aperio: Indie-A-Go-Go

Sounds Heard: Chris Wild–Abhanden

Framing Your Voice, Part 1

Send Chutes and Ladders

Citizenship

Steve Reich Wins 400K Euro BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award

Sounds Heard: Keeril Makan–Afterglow

Fair Trade for Sheet Music

Framing Your Voice, Part 2

Big Data Only Gets You So Far, or Why Social Science Is Really Hard

Very Modern Love Songs: Your Weird, Steamy Playlist for V-Day

Art in the Age: Going for (more than) a Song

New England’s Prospect: Boston Symphony Chamber Players Celebrate 50 Years

Sounds Heard: Big Robot

Kamala Sankaram: Being One with the Performance

Rethinking How We Teach Composition, Part 1

Putting Artists in the Limelight

Great Expectations: The Composer’s Progress

Sounds Heard: Things You Already Know

Keep Dallas Wired: The Dallas Opera Plugs Into Death and the Powers

You’re Doing Targeted Marketing Wrong

Rethinking How We Teach Composition, Part 2

Music for Difficult Days

Marc Neikrug: An Outlet for Emotional Experience

New England’s Prospect: The Agnosticism of Boston’s Equilibrium Concert Series

Three Strikes Against Success

Sixteen Composers Receive AAAL Awards Totaling $175,000

Sounds Heard: Janice Misurell-Mitchell—Vanishing Points

Skirts or Pants? How About Both

Towards a More Visceral Living

Challenging Tradition: Why Classical Musicians Should Learn Folk Music

Esa-Pekka Salonen Wins $100,000 2014 Nemmers Composition Prize

Unsung Heroes

Sounds Heard:The Quiet Ones

Is Contemporary Music Ready for a Baby Boom?

Tilting the Frame: Notes on an Alternative Education

Inspired Collaboration: No Idea Festival 2014

Broken Notions of Why Art Matters

Remembering Robert Ashley (1930-2014)

Marin Alsop, Frances Richard and Steven Schick to Receive ACF Champion of New Music Awards

Vicki Ray Reflects on 20 Years of Piano Spheres But Can She Play?

Sounds Heard: Zwerm—Underwater Princess Waltz

Joel Puckett: Real Life Inspiration

On the Purpose of Art in 700 Words or Less

Getting Out of the Box

David Lang and Alvin Singleton to be Inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters

SXNY – The Big Apple heads to Austin

1, 2, 3… Action

Sounds Heard: These Just Out

Jazz Audience Development: The Gender Factor

Goofing off, Perfected: Lessons from Fluxus

Phill Niblock and Elodie Lauten Receive Top FCA Awards

New England’s Prospect: The Gift of Sound and Vision

2014 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards Announced

Juan Orrego-Salas: I’ve Written All I Have to Write

Sarah Kirkland Snider Awarded DSO’s 7th Annual Elaine Lebenbom Memorial Award for Female Composers

OPERA America Awards $100K to 8 Female Opera Composers

Brooklyn in Austin’s House

Buddhist music-making: how meditation could transform the way you work

Cataloging the Fail: A Cathartic Scrapbook

Let’s Get Critical

Ted Hearne Named Third Annual New Voices Composer

Matana Roberts Named Among 2014 Herb Alpert Award Winners

New Music’s Quality Problem

Sounds Heard: Douglas Detrick—The Bright and Rushing World

New England’s Prospect: Beyond the Sea

Austin: Conspirare’s Moving Light

The Artist’s Dictionary: Redefining Success

When Life Throws You Cincinnati, Redefine Chili

Composers, Meet Identity-Protective Cognition

John Luther Adams Wins 2014 Pulitzer Prize in Music

Rome Prize Winners Announced

All the Colors of Life: A Celebration of Fred Ho (1957-2014)

Guggenheim Fellowship Awards in the US and Canada Announced

New Music is Academic Music

Sounds Heard: Adventures Far and Wide

Boston: Practice Sessions

Aaron Parks: Make Me Believe a Melody

LA: A Spring 2014 Concertgoer’s Journal, Part 1

Chicago: Relearning to Listen–New Piano Music for Children

So You Want To Write An Opera….

Austin: Fast Fo(u)rward

Performing Quality

Doris Duke Artist and First-Ever Impact Awards Announced

Sounds Heard: 17 More Takes on those 88 Keys

Lapsed Composer and Curmudgeonly Critic Reveals All About the Reviewing Racket!

13 Emerging Composers Selected for June 2014 Readings and Performances by NY Philharmonic and American
Composers Orchestra

So You Want To Start An Opera Company…
Austin: Mozart Requiem–Undead Defining Musical Quality

Sounds Heard: Thomas DeLio—Selected Compositions (1991-2013)

Chicago: For Practically Everyone—New Label Finds Our Musical Soft Spots

NewMusicBox @ 15: Reflections on Change, Challenge, and Music in the 21st Century

Dave Malloy: Singing for His Soul (Not His Supper)

Partyin’ Like It’s 1999

Music and Place

The 2000 Man—What Century Was This Anyway?

Games Played: FRACT OSC

The Odyssey of 2001

Leo Kraft (1922-2014): Spiky, Tart, and Fierce but also Sweet and Gentle

Trying to Put On Those 2002 Glasses

Trite and True

Peter Sellars and Chuck Berry Win 2014 Polar Prize

2003: Difficult Memories

Viewing Party: An Artist Profile Highlight Reel

2004: Keys to the Kingdom

Music and The Body

2005: The Friends and Family Plan

Sounds Heard: Meredith Monk—Piano Songs

2006: Walk Right In, Sit Right Down

2007: Big Ideas In a 140-Character World

Should I Start a New Music Ensemble?

2008: NewMusicBox Snapshots—Nine Images for Nine Years

You Don’t Say! Quotable Quotes from NewMusicBox

David T. Little Named 4th Composer in Residence at Opera Philadelphia

2009: Just Add A Dollop Of Salsa

Music and The Heart

2014 BMI Student Composer Awards Announced

2010: Favorite Things And Inspirations

Twelve Tidbits from 2011

2012: A Baker’s Dozen

Boston: Caroline Shaw’s Common Cause

The Class of 2013

20 Composers Honored at American Academy Ceremonial

Performers as Co-Creators

2014: Remembering The Year That Isn’t Over Yet

2014 ASCAP Concert Music Awards

Houston: River Oaks Chamber Orchestra

Sounds Heard: Jefferson Friedman and Craig Wedren—On In Love

Music and The Number Four

Profiling the Jazz Police

What’s In a Festival?

NY Phil Biennial Pre-Game

Making the Numbers Work

Chicago: The ancient futuremusic of Sam Scranton

Miya Masaoka: Social and Sonic Relationships

Pavillons en l’air—Bell’s Up on the NYPhil Biennial

Classical Music in the Era of ESPN

Sounds Heard: Azure Carter and Alan Sondheim—Avatar Woman

Composing on the Pacific Crest Trail

27 Orchestras Honored with 2013-14 ASCAP Awards For Adventurous Programming

San Antonio: SOLI chamber ensemble—20 years of new music

January: Wyoming and the Open

2014 Paul Revere Awards Announced at Music Publishers Association Annual Meeting

NY Phil Biennial: Scads, Oodles, and Heaps of Composers

Get ‘Em While They’re Young: New Music as a Gateway to Classical Music

Sounds Heard: Andy Biskin Ibid—Act Necessary

ASCAP Honors 5 Jazz Legends and 36 Emerging Talents

Kevin Puts Appointed Director of Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute

Elodie Lauten (1950-2014): Channeling Cosmic Forces

Let’s Get American About Our Music

February: New Mexico and the Holes

Ciao Manhattan: A Remembrance of Lee Hyla (1952-2014)

On the Good and the Great—Wrapping up the NY Phil Biennial

Boston: Bromp Treb Busts the Matrix

Lessons from the Central Valley

Metropolitan Opera Cancels Death of Klinghoffer Live HD Transmission

Sounds Heard: Akropolis Reed Quintet—Unraveled

Readers Respond to Death of Klinghoffer Simulcast Cancellation

Jim (J.K.) Randall (1929-2014)—Out of View of Anything Resembling the Mainstream

Bora Yoon: The Weight of Magic

March: Virginia and the Dancers

Listening to the Journey:Hypersensitive Hearing on the Trail

Nerd Composer

Sounds Heard: Robert Erickson Complete String Quartets

Chicago: The deafening silence of the Beethoven Festival musicians

The Score Has Got You By the Short Hairs

NEA Names 2014 National Heritage Fellowships and 2015 Jazz Masters

Boston: SICPP’s Love and Geometry

April: Texas, New York, and the Oppositions

Pew Announces 2014 Grants for Philadelphia Artists and Organizations

D.J. Spooky Wins National Geographic Society Emerging Explorer Award

Memories of Horace Silver (1928-2014)

The Roar of the Crowd: Freelance Musicians Speak Out on Non-Payment

WRITERS

Armando Bayolo
Emily Bookwalter
Jordan Borg
David Brensilver
Sidney Chen
Kevin Clark
Collaborators of Robert Ashley
Andy Costello
Grant Chu Covell
Kealy Cozens
Rob Deemer
Andy Doe
Nat Evans
Daniel Felsenfeld
David First
Kenneth D. Froelich
Alexandra Gardner
Aaron Gervais
Mara Gibson
Bob Gluck
Jennie Gottschalk
Kurt Gottschalk
Matthew Guerrieri
Luke Gullickson
Joseph Hallman
Kenneth Hamrick
Ratzo B. Harris
Zach Herchen
Monika Herzig
Caio Higginson
Sam Hillmer
Eugene Holley, Jr.
Colin Holter
Ben Houge
Marie Incontrera
Willard Jenkins
Jennifer Jolley
Ethan Joseph
Chris Kallmyer
Zoe Kemmerling
Aaron Jay Kernis
Daniel Kessner
Daniel J. Kushner
Kristin Kuster
Steven Mackey
John McNeil
Ellen McSweeney
Dom Minasi
Clint Needham
Osnat Netzer
Frank J. Oteri
Marek Poliks
Will Robin
Mathew Rosenblum
Adam Rudolph
Charles Ruggiero
Mischa Salkind-Pearl
Isaac Schankler
Sean Shepherd
Molly Sheridan
Daniel Siepmann
Andrew Sigler
Walter Simmons
Greg Simon
Sara Sitzer
Adam Sliwinski
Edward Smaldone
Alex Temple
Dennis Tobenski
Evan Tobias
Dale Trumbore
Sugar Vendil
Dan Visconti

Officers

Frederick Peters, Chair
Steven Stucky, Vice Chair
Kristin Lancino, Secretary
Joseph Walker, Treasurer
Ed Harsh, President and CEO

Trustees

Rae Alexander-Minter
Theodore Chapin
Dorothea Endicott
Tim Gallagher
Daniel S. Godfrey
Harriet Kaufman
James Kendrick
Alan Kornberg
Marya Martin
Phyllis Mills
Gayle Morgan
Barbara A. Petersen
Frances Richard
Esa-Pekka Salonen
Steven Schick
Matías Tarnopolsky

Steve Reich, Trustee Emeritus

Artists Council

Harold Meltzer, Chair
Eve Beglarian
Derek Bermel
Chen Yi
Alvin Curran
Gabriela Lena Frank
Laura Karpman
Paul S. Phillips
Robert Xavier Rodriguez
Steve Reich
Julia Wolfe

Media Council

Alex Shapiro, Chair
Deborah Campana
Daphne Carr
John Nasukaluk Clare
Christine Clark
Jean Cook
Jessica Lustig
Doug McLennan
Marvin Rosen
Norman Ryan
Carol Zale

Staff

Chitra Arunasalam
Director of Finance and
Administration

Madeline Bohm
Software Engineer and Designer

Emily Bookwalter (Through 6/30/2015)
Grantmaking and Community
Manager

Kevin Clark
Director of Platform

Kristen Doering (Starting 7/1/2015)
Grantmaking Associate

Eddy Ficklin
Senior Software Engineer

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

Ethan Joseph (Through 6/30/2015)
Manager for Individual Giving

Brad Lenz (Starting 7/1/2015)
Development Associate for Individual Giving

Debbie Milburn (Starting 7/1/2015)
Junior Software Engineer

Frank J. Oteri
Composer Advocate and Senior
Editor, NewMusicBox

Sam Reising
Grantmaking and Social Media Manager

Hannah Rubashkin
Development Manager for Institutional Giving

Deborah Steinglass
Director of Development

Molly Sheridan
Executive Editor, NewMusicBox and
Director, Counterstream Radio

Scott Winship
Director of Grantmaking Programs

ENDOWMENT

 

Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust

The Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Inc.

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

Baisley Powell Elebash Fund

The Ford Foundation

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The National Endowment for the Arts

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund

The Helen F. Whitaker Fund

Anonymous

INSTITUTIONS

$100,000+

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Booth Ferris Foundation

The New York State Council on the Arts

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund

$50,000-99,999

Aaron Copland Fund

The Alice M. Ditson Fund

The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

The National Endowment for the Arts

$10,000-$24,999

The Amphion Foundation

The Carl Jacobs Foundation

The Francis Goelet Trust

The Getty Foundation

The Howard Gilman Foundation

The John Duffy Trust

$3,000-$9,999

ASCAP Corporation

ASCAP Foundation

Sargent Family Foundation

The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts

The Reed Foundation

Sargent Family Foundation

$1,500-$2,999

BMI Foundation

Rodgers and Hammerstein Foundation

$1,000-$1,499

BMI Corporation

COMPOSERS LEADERSHIP CIRCLE

Leaders ($5,000+)

John Adams

John Harbison

Steve Stucky

Advocates ($2,000 -$4,999)

Dan Godfrey

Augusta Read Thomas
In honor of James Kendrick, Kristin Lancino, Frances Richard, and Steven Stucky

Endorsers ($500-$1,999)

John Luther Adams

Samuel Adler

Daniel Asia

Donald Crockett

Michael Daugherty

Orlando Jacinto Garcia

Stephen Harke

Jake Heggie

Jennifer Higdon

Pierre Jalbert

Benjamin B. Johnston

Lori Laitman

David Liptak

David Ludwig

Steven Mackey

Beata Moon

Robert Paterson

Shulamit Ran

Steve Reich

Michael Schelle

Elliott Schwartz

Laura Schwendinger

Alex Shapiro

Judith Shatin

Frank Ticheli

Donald Walker

Dan Welcher

Anonymous

Individuals

New Music Connect Members

Tom Brener and Inbal Segev

Dorothea Endicott

John McCormick

Justus and Elizabeth Schlichting

Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

Ms. Cecille Wasserman

$10,000+

Tom Brenner

Dorothea Endicott

Alan Kornberg

Frederick Peters

Justus and Elizabeth Schlichting

Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

Cece Wasserman (The Cheswatyr Foundation)

$3,000-$9,999

NancyBell Coe

Ms. Marya Martin and Mr. Kenneth Davidson

Tim Gallagher

A. Slade and Phyllis Mills

John Adams and Deborah O’Grady

Barbara A. Petersen

Mr. Robert Wise

$1,200-$2,999

(Le) Poisson Rouge

Daniel Godfrey

John McCormick

Kristin and Thierry Lancino

Michael Embler and Marie Cilenti

Michel and Caroline Zaleski

Mr. and Ms. Linda and Stuart Nelson

Mr. Ed Harsh

Mr. Paul J. Sperry

Mr. Steven Mackey

Ms. Frances Richard

Ms. Gayle Morgan

Ms. Harriet Kaufman

Matías Tarnopolsky

$600-$1,199

Mr. John Luther Adams

Ms. Jennifer Higdon

Mr. Benjamin B. Johnston

Ms. Leslie Kandell

James Kendrick

Lori Laitman

Elyse and Steve Montiel

Thomas W. Morris

Mr. Jim Rosenfield

Esa-Pekka Salonen

Ms. Alex Shapiro

$300-$599

Astrid Baumgardner

Chameleon John

Theodore Chapin

John Evans

Susan Feder

Mr. Orlando Jacinto Garcia

Mr. Jake Heggie

Mr. Joel Horwich

Amy Iwano

Chen Yi and Zhou Long

Catherine Luening

David Alan Miller

Mr. and Ms. Martin and Lucy Miller Murray

Mr. Steve Reich

Steven and Brenda Schick

Mr. Frank Ticheli

Tobi Inc.

Travel Ticker

Mr. Richard Wilson

Anonymous (3)

$120-$299

Mr. Samuel Adler

Mr. Roger M. Aldridge

Dr. Nancy Bogen-Greissle

Emily Bookwalter

Mr. Martin Bresnick

Gloria Cheng

Susan Cheng

Mr. Michael Ching

Ms. Judith Cody

Ms. Joanne Hubbard Cossa

Anthony Creamer

Mr. Donald Crockett

Andrew Cyr

Mr. Michael Daugherty

Mr. Richard Einhorn

John Evans

Michael and Nancy Coffin Geller

Mr. Mitch Gillette

Kimberly D. Grigsby

Ms. Kathy Henkel

Ms. Felicity A. Howlett

Mr. David Liptak

Mr. Harold Meltzer

Maury Newburger

David Newman

Mr. Marc D. Ostrow

Vivian Perlis

Mr. Rufus Reid

Mr. Peter Rubardt

Mr. Norman D. Ryan

Elliott Schwartz

Sinclair Llewelyn LLC

Maestro Stanislaw Skrowaczewski

Mr. Preston Stahly

Ann and Dick Sullivan

Robert Sutherland

Lawrence Tarlow

Stephen Oleskey and Judith Tick

Libby Van Cleve and Jack Vees

Ms. Jennifer Wada

Mr. Donald Burke Walker

Mr. Dan Welcher

Dr. Robert Xavier-Rodriguez

Ms. Judith Lang Zaimont

Anonymous (2)

$60-$119

Mr. Arthur Allen

Bill Alves

Mr. T.J. Anderson

Mr. Lawrence Axelrod

Joe Baio

Mrs. Lillian Barbash

Belinda Reynolds and Dan Becker

William Hayes Biggs

David Borden

Mr. Allen Brings

Whitman Brown

Philip C. Brunelle

Wesley A. Clark

Nancy S. Clarke

Mr. Noah Creshevsky

Mr. Daniel Crozier

Mr. Conrad Cummings

Ms. Beth Denisch

Mary H. DuPree

Marti Epstein

Mr. Paul A. Epstein

Mr. Ralph Grierson

Dr. Susan E. Haig

Maestro Thomas Hampson

William Holab

Samuel H. Hope

Ms. Laura Kaminsky

Lydia G. Kontos

Ms. Dorothy Lawson

Ms. Tania Leon

Mr. Arthur Levering

Clara Longstreth

Frances McKay

Ms. Janice Misurell-Mitchell

Jeffrey Mumford

Mr. John Nuechterlein

Ms. Barbara Oldham

Ursula Oppens

Neva Pilgrim

Mr. Peter Schickele

Mr. Anthony W. Schuman

Wesley and Robert Scorfani

Ms. Judith Shatin

Ms. Lucy A. Shelton

Ms. Dawn Upshaw

Dana Wilson

Mark Winges

$1-$59

Elizabeth R. Austin

David Balakrishnan

Ms. Carol Barnett

Mrs. Heather Barringer

WIlliam Bolcom and Joan Morris

Timothy Broege

Thomas D. Brosh

Margaret Brouwer

Donald Byrd

Mr. Robert Dick

Ephraim Bay Publishing Company

Jan Faidley

Kath Fraser

Ian Fredrick

Gerald Fried

Julie Sandler-Friedman

Ms. Annelies Fryberger

James Ginsburg and Patrice Michaels

Lars J. Hanson

Yvonne Hawley

Jennifer Idaly

Mr. Pierre Jalbert

Jane Jarrett

Ethan Joseph

Craig Richard Keogh

Stephanie Key

Pete Klosterman

Jessica Krash

Anne LeBaron

Sherry Leising

Sharan Leventhal

Nanette Mcguinness and Florence Zeisler Cooper

Beata Moon

Mythology Records

New Party Systems

Mr. Kevin Noe

Tristan and Lesley Perich

Luke Rackers

Ms. Patsy Rogers

Mr. Victor Rosenbaum

Eleonor Sandresky

Mr. Jim Schaeffer

Ms. Sarah Schaffer

Mr. Carl Schimmel

Sharon Smith

Gerald Starlight

Mr. Thomas Steenland

Deborah Steinglass

Steven Tintweiss

Mr. Alan Twohig

Mr. David Vayo

Aleksandra Vrebalov

James Wolken

Bora Yoon

Mr. John Zielinski

Mr. Theodore Zook

Anonymous (3)

 

Performance of Black Mountain Songs
(Photo by Julieta Cervantes)

Cary Awardees So Percussion
(Photo by Photo by Gene Pittman, courtesy Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.)

Nankoweap Granaries
(Photo by Trevor Reed)

Samuel Adler
(Photo by Molly Sheridan)

Trimpin and Ludovic Morlot
(Photo courtesy of the Seattle Symphony)

Performance of TRIBE: life in gestures
(Photo by Javier Galeano)

Harrison Bankhead Quartet Performance at Edgefest 2014
(Photo by Lars Bjorn)

Sheila Jordan, Fay Victor, and Jen Shyu
(Photos by Molly Sheridan)

Edmar Castañeda
(Photo by Diana Bejarano)

Gelsey Bell
(Photo by Molly Sheridan)

Concert Premiere of George Lewis’s Afterword, The AACM (as) Opera at Roulette
(Photo courtesy of digitice.org)

95 Rituals (for Anna Halprin)
(Photo by Pak Han)

Laurie Spiegel
(Photo by Molly Sheridan and Alexandra Gardner)

A Selection of Cary Fund Awardees
(Photos by permission of the ensembles)

Performance of Black Mountain Songs
(Photo by Julieta Cervantes)

Film Still from Body and Soul
(Photo by Don DiNicola and Renee Baker)

Performance of TRIBE: life in gestures
(Photo by Javier Galeano)

Total Revenue :
$2,627,190

Total Expenses :
$2,626,828
(including $990,327 in grants to the field)

Endowment value as of 6/30/15:
$15,564,008

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Officers

 

Frederick Peters, Chair

Kristin Lancino, Vice Chair

Matías Tarnopolsky, Secretary

Joseph Walker, Treasurer

Ed Harsh, President and CEO

Trustees

 

Theodore Chapin

Dorothea Endicott

Tim Gallagher

Daniel S. Godfrey

Amy Iwano

Harriet Kaufman

James Kendrick

Alan Kornberg

Marya Martin

Phyllis Mills

Gayle Morgan

Barbara Petersen

Frances Richard

Esa-Pekka Salonen

Steven Schick

Steve Stucky, Founding Member in Memoriam

Steve Reich, Trustee Emeritus

Program Council

 

Derek Bermel

Seth Boustead

Sarah Cahill

Michael Ching

Christine Clark

Jean Cook

Reena Esmail

Gabriela Lena Frank

Jennifer Jolley

Laura Karpman

George Lewis

Jimmy Lopez

Paula Matthusen

Harold Meltzer

Robert Xavier Rodriguez

Alex Shapiro

Staff

Chitra Arunasalam (Through 6/30/2016)
Director of Finance and Administration

Madeline Bohm
Software Engineer and Designer

Kevin Clark (Through 6/30/2016)
Director of Platform

Kristen Doering
Grantmaking Associate

Eddy Ficklin
Senior Software Engineer

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

Shaynah Jeffers (Starting 7/1/2016)
Finanace Manager

Brad Lenz
Development Manager

Debbie Milburn (Through 6/30/2016)
Junior Software Engineer

Frank J. Oteri
Composer Advocate and Senior Editor, NewMusicBox

Sam Reising
Grantmaking and Social Media Manager

Hannah Rubashkin (Through 6/30/2016)
Development Manager for Institutional Giving

Deborah Steinglass
Director of Development

Molly Sheridan
Executive Editor, NewMusicBox and Director, Counterstream Radio

Scott Winship
Director of Grantmaking Programs

Blake Whiteley (Starting 7/1/2016)
Development Assistant

Performance of One Land, One River, One People
(Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Orchestra)

Performance of anatomy theater
(Photo by James Daniel)

Performance of The Canticle of the Black Madonna
(Photo by Jenny Graham/Anima Mundi Productions)

Performance of Coffee County Tennessee
(Photo by Steve Sasche)

Muhal Richard Abrams
(Photo by Molly Sheridan)

Performance of On a Sufficient Condition for the Existence of the Most Specific Hypothesis
(Photo courtesy of Alia Musica Pittsburgh)

Performance of anatomy theater
(Photo by James Daniel)

Missy Mazzolli
(Photo by Molly Sheridan)

Gerald Clayton
(Photo by Tim Duffy)

Rehearsal of Newark in Tune
(Photo by Spencer Frohwirth)

Performance of Borders
(Photo by Pavel Antonov)

Performance of Becoming…
(Photo by Elliot Mandel)

Performance of Hydrogen(2)Oxygen
(Photo courtesy of Smithsonian)

Performance of Timber
(Photo by Elizabeth Bayer)

Pulsa at Harmony Ranch
(Photo by Pulsa)

Hannibal Lokumbe
(Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Orchestra)

1989 Bang on a Can Marathon Poster

John Duffy
(Photo Courtesy of EAMDC)

Performance of Borders
(Photo by Pavel Antonov)

 

ENDOWMENT

Mary Flagler Cary Charitable Trust
The Aaron Copland Fund for Music, Inc.
The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
Baisley Powell Elebash Fund
The Ford Foundation
The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
Francis Goelet Charitable Lead Trusts
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The National Endowment for the Arts
The Rockefeller Brothers Fund
The Helen F. Whitaker Fund
Anonymous

INSTITUTIONS

$100,000+

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
The Mary Flager Cary Charitable Trust
The New York State Council on the Arts
The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

$50,000-99,999

The Aaron Copland Fund
The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation
The National Endowment for the Arts
The Alice M. Ditson Fund

$10,000-$24,999

The Amphion Foundation
The Francis Goelet Trust
The Getty Foundation
The Reed Foundation

$3000-$9,999

ASCAP Corporation
The ASCAP Foundation
The Fan Fox and Leslie Samuels Foundation
The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts

$1500-$2999

BMI Corporation
The BMI Foundation
The Rodgers and Hammerstein Foundation

$1000-$1499

The Harkness Foundation for Dance

COMPOSERS CIRCLE

Leaders ($5,000+)

John Harbison
Steve Stucky

Advocates ($2,000 -$4,999)

John Adams
Dan Godfrey
Augusta Read Thomas
In honor of James Kendrick, Kristin Lancino, Frances Richard, and Steven Stucky

Endorsers ($500-$1,999)

Samuel Adler
Ed Harsh
Jake Heggie
Jennifer Higdon
Lori Laitman
Steve Reich
Elliott Schwartz
Alex Shapiro
Anonymous (2)

Individuals

$10,000+

Alan Kornberg
Frederick Peters
Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

$3000-$9,999

Arts Federation
NancyBell Coe
Marya Martin and
Kenneth Davidson

$1200-$2999

Michael Embler and Maria Cilenti
Dorothea Endicott
David and Harriet Kaufman
Kristin and Thierry Lancino
A. Slade and Phyllis Mills
Linda and Stuart Nelson
Barbara A. Petersen
Frances Richard
Susan Sollins-Brown
Paul Sperry
The Cheswatyr Foundation
Wise Family Charitable Foundation

$600-$1199

Mrs. Helen Coyner
Mr. Anthony Creamer
Leslie Kandell
James Kendrick
Mr. and Mrs. Richard and Karen LeFrak In honor of Ed Yim
Gayle Morgan
Mr. Thomas W. Morris
Steven and Brenda Schick
Mr. Elliott Schwartz
Matias Tarnopolsky
The Selvage Fund
Dr. Carol Zale
Mr. Michel Zaleski In honor of Fred Peters
Anonymous (1)

$300-$599

Mr. Samuel Adler
Dr. Rae Alexander-Minter
Rhoda Baruch In honor of Ethan Joseph
Mr. and Mrs. Astrid and John Baumgardner
Theodore and Joanna Chapin
Ms. Susan Feder and Todd Gordon
Benjamin B. Johnston
Mr. David Alan Miller
Martin and Lucy Miller Murray
Frank Proto
Mr. Gilbert B. Rose
Stephen Sondheim
Ms. Connie Steensma
Anonymous (3)

$120-$299

Dr. Dwight D. Andrews
Ms. Deborah Campana and Mitchell Arnold
Ms. Susan Cheng
Andrew Chiang
Ms. Judith Cody
Joanne Cossa
Noah Creshevsky
Mr. Donald Crockett
Dr. Gabriela Lena Frank
Michael and Nancy Coffin Geller
Ms. Kathy Henkel
Ms. Laura Kaminsky
Ms. Lydia Kontos
Mr. Richard LeSueur
Mr. and Mrs. Barry and Sally Mandel
Mr. Ed Matthew
Mr. Harold Meltzer
Ms. Ursula Oppens
Mr. Marc Ostrow
Mr. Daniel J. Perlongo
Mr. Norman Ryan
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski
Mr. Paul Smadbeck
Ms. Deborah Steinglass
Robert Sutherland
Lawrence Tarlow
Jennifer Wada
Gernot Wolfgang
Zhou Long and Chen Yi
Wes York and Bob Scrofani
Ms. Judith Lang Zaimont
Anonymous (3)

$60-$119

Roger M. Aldridge
Mr. Greg Allen
Mr. Bill Alves
Daniel Asia
Robert and Linda Attiyeh
Mrs. Lilian Barbash
Ms. Carol Barnett
Ms. Eve Beglarian
In honor of Frances Richard
Mr. Philip C. Brunelle
Thomas Buckner
Ms. Gloria Cheng
Wesley Clark In honor of Kevin E.F. Clark
Thomas Cleman
Andrew Cyr
Ms. Mary H. DuPree
Dr. Marti Epstein
Mr. Paul A. Epstein
Mr. Peter Flint
Mitch Gillette
Peter Golub
Dr. Susan E. Haig
Maestro Thomas Hampson
Mr. Bernard Hoffer
Ms. Felicity A. Howlett
Heidi Jacob
Dan Joseph
Bill Kraft
Ms. Jessica A. Krash
Paul Lansky
Ms. Tania Leon
Arthur Levering
Mrs. Nancy B. Loeffler
Ms. Patricia Mancini
Maury Newburger
Dr. Timothy Olsen
Ms. Vivian Perlis
Neva Pilgrim
Michael Robinson
Dr. Robert Xavier Rodriguez
Mr. Peter Rubardt
Mr. Anthony W. Schuman
Mr. Peter W. Shea
Ms. Lucy A. Shelton
Dr. Gloria Wilson Swisher
Stephen Oleskey and
Judith Tick
Libby Van Cleve
and Jack Vees
Frank Wallace
Mr. Dan Welcher
Mr. James H. Willey
Yehudi Wyner
Anonymous (6)

$1-$59

Dr. Elizabeth R. Austin
Dan Becker
William Bolcom
and Joan Morris
Ms. Linda Bouchard
Ms. Kim Braun
Mr. Thomas D. Brosh
Margaret Brouwer
Ryan Brown
Robert B. Carl
Mr. Elliot Cole
Mr. Allan Crossman
Mr. Conrad Cummings
Dr. Michael G. Cunningham
Mr. Doug Davis
In honor of Earl Kim
Mr. Kenneth Deveney
Ms. Jan Faidley
Jim Fox In honor of Cold Blue Music
Aaron Friedman
Mr. Ralph Grierson
Mr. Jonathan Bailey Holland
Mr. Peter Homans
Pierre Jalbert
Mr. Alden Jenks
Ethan Joseph
Mr. Chris Lastovicka
Anne LeBaron
Sharan Leventhal
Robert McCormick
Mr. Lars Michnevich
In honor of Burton A. Johnston
Ms. Janice Misurell-Mitchell
Ms. Martha Mooke
Amanda Moran In honor of Lea Burroughs
Jeffrey Mumford
Dr. Michael Murray
Dr. Robert Nasta
Paula Peace
Alan Ferber and Jody Redhage
Mr. David Rimelis
Ms. Erin Rogers
Ms. Patsy Rogers
Mr. Martin Rokeach
Curtis Rumrill
Mr. Allen Shearer
Dr. Adam Silverman In honor of Frank J. Oteri

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Total Revenue :
$2,610,816

Total Expenses :
$2,607,828
(including $1,097,382 in grants to the field)

Endowment value as of 6/30/14:
$17,749,969
(including $12,813,703 restricted to grantmaking)

Officers

Frederick Peters, Chair
Steven Stucky, Vice Chair
Kristin Lancino, Secretary
Joseph Walker, Treasurer
Ed Harsh, President and CEO

Trustees

Rae Alexander-Minter
Theodore Chapin
NancyBell Coe
Dorothea Endicott
Tim Gallagher
Daniel S. Godfrey
Harriet Kaufman
James Kendrick
Alan Kornberg
Marya Martin
Phyllis Mills
Gayle Morgan
Barbara A. Petersen
Frances Richard
Esa-Pekka Salonen
Steven Schick
Matías Tarnopolsky

Artists Council

Harold Meltzer, Chair
Eve Beglarian
Derek Bermel
Chen Yi
Alvin Curran
Gabriela Lena Frank
Laura Karpman
Paul S. Phillips
Robert Xavier Rodriguez
Steve Reich
Julia Wolfe

Media Council

Alex Shapiro, Chair
Deborah Campana
Daphne Carr
John Nasukaluk Clare
Christine Clark
Jean Cook
Jessica Lustig
Doug McLennan
Marvin Rosen
Norman Ryan
Carol Zale

Staff

Chitra Arunasalam
Director of Finance and
Administration

Emily Bookwalter
Grantmaking and Community
Manager

Kevin Clark
Strategic Director for Public
Engagement

Melissa De Bartolomeo
Developer

Eddy Ficklin
Technology Manager and Developer

Alexandra Gardner
Associate Editor and Community
Manager, NewMusicBox

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

Ethan Joseph
Manager for Individual Giving

Frank J. Oteri
Composer Advocate and Senior
Editor, NewMusicBox

Sam Reising
Grantmaking Assistant

Hannah Rubashkin
Manager for Institutional Giving

Deborah Steinglass
Director of Development

Molly Sheridan
Executive Editor, NewMusicBox and
Director, Counterstream Radio

Scott Winship
Director of Grantmaking Programs

The audience at a Dithyrambalina performance
(photo by Tod Seelie)

Invisible Cities
(photo by Dana Ross)

NewMusicBox@15
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Lisa Bielawa
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Invisible Cities
(photo by Dana Ross)

Education Week
(photo by Molly Sheridan)

Vijay Iyer
(photo by Jimmy Katz)

Ragamala Dance
(photo by Ed Bock)

Aaron Parks
(photoby Alexandra Gardner)

Ellen McSweeny
(photo by Danielle Aquiline)

Uniting New Music Communities In Oregon
(photo by David Eisenband)

Performance of Jim Crow’s Tears
(photo by Liz Brauer)

Anna Clyne, Jennifer Koh, and
Jamie Laredo with the LA Chamber Orchestra
(photo by Jamie Pham)

Juan Orrego-Salas
(photo courtesy of Juan Orrego-Salas)

Andrew Cyr
(photo courtesy of Metropolis Ensemble)

Theris at a Dithyrambalina performance
(photo by Melissa Stryker)

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