New Music USA


2016—2017
YEAR IN REVIEW


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Creativity demands change. Change demands creativity. In a year of surprising and sometimes disorienting change, New Music USA continued its creative evolution to support our constituency in new and relevant ways while confirming our unshakeable commitment to three core values.

We believe in the fundamental importance of creative artists and their work — a society without respect for its artists is a dead society. We espouse a broad, open definition of “new music” — closed borders limit; openness empowers. We uphold and embrace principles of inclusivity and equitable treatment in all of our activity in terms of gender, race, age, location, national origin, sexual orientation, religion, socio-economic status, and artistic practice — difference is not a threat; it’s an opportunity, a chance to hear a new voice, see a new perspective, feel a new inspiration.

Following on the value of inclusivity, we have doubled down on our commitment to being a national organization that supports the entirety of the new music community without restriction according to musical practice or personal identity. As you continue to read through our Year in Review, you will see this commitment manifested throughout.

Our national reach is exemplified by Antenna Studies for Splinter Reeds at Blue Sage Center for the Arts, which will bring a new and exciting piece by Paula Matthusen to Paonia, Colorado. And by a project for the Omaha-based free improvisation quartet Screaming Plastic to record a debut album. Our commitment to defining new music broadly and engaging everyone within that broad definition is clear from projects such as Rennie Harris’s Lifted, which brings hip hop dance to the stage, and Devesh Chandra’s From Our Roots, which explores the similarities between Indian classical music and music from the Oneida tribe. Our desire to engage with everyone in the new music community is demonstrated by Sign & Sing – Visible Speech, a project to commission a new work by and for people who are deaf. And by the pairing of NewMusicBox article “Composing and Motherhood,” by Emily Doolittle, with a project by Allison Loggins-Hull that explores “the duality of being a mother and an artist.”

During the 2016-17 season, New Music USA’s programming evolved in a number of important ways. We began a new round of our orchestra residency program Music Alive and proceeded through a second year of our New Music Impact Fund, a program supporting small ensembles, presenters, and venues. And furthering our mission to serve the field through virtual means, we built toward our goal of a web platform that allows us to make powerful, integrated use of our remarkable collection of content from NewMusicBox, Counterstream Radio, and our grantmaking programs.

This Year In Review only contains a small sampling of the work we’ve done for the new music community over the past year. I invite you to visit newmusicusa.org and explore the enormous scope of new music in the USA today.

 

Ed Harsh
President and CEO



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When Boston’s Prometheus Dance, together with Turkish-born choreographer Korhan Basaran and Syrian-born composer Kinan Azmeh, submitted Project RAu to New Music USA for funding consideration, they shared this view of the power of art with us:

Through this collaborative work and the belief that Art is a window to the memory of experience, we shift focus from one of fear to one of understanding through our common sense of humanity.

Through a creative process that involves artists, students, and the public, Project RAu — which received a 2017 project grant from New Music USA — seeks to inspire individuals to be thoughtful about the international refugee crisis and to take action. The work will be developed during multiple residencies. In addition, Prometheus will host in-process conversations in their studio that will be open to the public and the artists will also work with the Boston Center for the Arts, Boston Conservatory at Berklee, and the Walnut Hill School for the Arts to engage students in this important project.
The project will premiere in Boston in the winter of 2018 and then tour to New York City and Washington, D.C., as well as to Ankara and Istanbul in Turkey through the support of the American Embassy in Ankara.


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Recently there’s been an increase in attention paid to the issues faced by female composers and the barriers they continue to encounter in the music world. Over the past year, in addition to articles concerning these issues in general, New Music USA published a NewMusicBox article and also supported a project that both shone light on the specific challenges confronting composers who are mothers.

In “Composing and Motherhood,” author Emily Doolittle describes how “composers who are mothers intentionally and unintentionally get written out of new music.” The factors that contribute to this include the prevalence of fees that are too low to allow for childcare costs, the scheduling of late night performances, residencies that demand long periods of time away from home and family, and “emerging” composer opportunities with age restrictions that don’t allow for the career hiatus many mothers choose to take. Finally, while not an issue specific to new music, Doolittle mentions how in our society at large, phrases such as “even your mom would like it” imply that “mom” stands in direct opposition to art that is incisive, interesting, and meaningful. In a field that is focused on pushing boundaries and experimentation, this implicit assumption can be very damaging.

Doolittle offers many potential solutions to these barriers, noting that an organization/individual would not have to implement every suggestion, but that each would make the new music world slightly more hospitable for mothers. Among these solutions are having occasional daytime new music concerts, providing childcare, offering multiple short residencies instead of one long one, allowing families to attend a residency, removing age restrictions from competitions, and not penalizing composers for gaps in their resume, among many others.

Perhaps the most important takeaway is the suggestion that it’s time to recognize and accept that being a mother is not at all in conflict with being a composer or an artist of any type:

I’d suggest that the most important thing we can do is move away from seeing motherhood as something inherently “negative for” or “in competition with” the creation of music … Let’s value the many, varied paths people follow, and instead of intentionally or unintentionally keeping people out, think of how we can make room for all who want to contribute.


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Taking the issue of motherhood and new music from the page to the stage, we were proud this year to provide support for Diametrically Composed, a project which explores the “duality of being a mother and an artist.”

The project involves a number of composers who are mothers, including Jessica Meyer, Alicia Hall Moran, Valerie Coleman, Sarah Kirkland Snider, and Paola Prestini, who are each composing new pieces for flutist/composer Allison Loggins-Hull and pianist Gabriela Martinez. The performance will incorporate speaking and narrative elements that retell the experiences of a number of mothers who work in the arts. The work will also question and confront the double standard that motherhood, but not fatherhood, is often perceived to be at odds with the pursuit of a professional life — in any field, including the arts.

Loggins-Hull, the project’s organizer, explains:

I remember performing in a concert eight months pregnant and receiving awkwardly blank stares. Maybe because I was young and a little naïve it never occurred to me that my having a child would be questionable to some people … I began to wonder, “Will I be able to pull this off? Am I selfish for being so dedicated to my career? Is this a terrible life for a child?” For the most part, I was able to shake off these negative thoughts, but from time to time, they still haunt me to this day.

But then I think of my children and the music they are surrounded by. I think of the little songs we’ve come up with together. I think of my son’s first piano recital, or accompanying my daughter on flute to her favorite nursery rhyme. I think of my son’s proud face when he comes to my shows or his excitement when I show him how to make “beats” with Logic. I think about the future, when my daughter is chasing her own dreams and that she can look to me as a role model — my son, too. I think about how much they inspire my every move and motivate me to keep going. I realize, this is magic. This is a blessing. This is true love.

Diametrically Composed is inspired by all of the above and so much more. I am so proud of all of the amazing women involved in the project. They are phenomenal, they are mothers, they come from diverse backgrounds, and they each have a unique and powerful voice. My goal is for Diametrically Composed to not only contribute great works of new music, but to also inspire people of all backgrounds to pursue ALL of their dreams despite the challenges, naysayers or obstacles that may be in the way.

Keep an eye out! Diametrically Composed will premiere in New York City during the 2018-19 season and will then tour across the country.


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What happens when an artist of North Indian descent and another from the Oneida Nation decide to collaborate on a new work? In his project page description of From Our Roots, Devesh Chandra writes:

As a musician, I am constantly intrigued by and motivated to learn about parallels in how music is thought of across cultures and traditions… Further, by bringing together and finding commonality amongst two seemingly distant traditions, we hope to foster understanding through music.

Chandra, who teaches tabla at Williams College and grew up learning about North Indian music, collaborated with Oneida composer, singer, and guitarist Joanne Shenandoah. The work we supported explores “the deep connections and commonality amongst music of India, Indian Classical Music, and Native American music from the rich history of the Oneida Nation.” Specifically, the artists found rich similarities around the themes of spirituality, nature, and tradition and sought to create a piece of music that would explore these themes.

In April, Chandra and Shenandoah prayed on Oneida land and then performed together at the Chapel at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. The music, conversation, and prayers were filmed as a part of a broader documentary called RASA which will use music to explore culture and people in central New York. From Our Roots will continue this fall with another performance at Hamilton College, which will be recorded with 360 video and spatial audio to bring this collaboration to as many people as possible.


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Abraham in Flames is an opera that is an original parable. This parable is inspired by the presence of Iranian poet/writer Ahmad Shamlou in the life of librettist Niloufar Talebi as well as her memories of him and the role that he played in her life. Shamlou’s book, Abraham in Flames, is a twentieth-century collection of poems about “the purity of truth-seekers.” The opera, which Talebi is creating in partnership with composer Aleksandra Vrebalov and director Roy Rallo, is not a direct interpretation of the book, but rather it takes its moral and adapts it to be about the “beauty of risk-takers” and the passage of art from one generation to the next. Talebi explains the complexity of the new work on the Abraham in Flames project page on newmusicusa.org:

We tell this story in a flipped relationship: the chorus is the main character and soloists have supporting roles. The role of Poet is also flipped, sung by a female to diffuse the patriarchal norm of males looming as authority figures in women’s lives, while the truth of the work — the indelible impact of mentors — remains intact. The singers will move around audiences in a non-proscenium venue in a seamless transfer of human voice.

The first half of Abraham in Flames was workshopped at the Wilsey Center for Opera in San Francisco from September 30-October 4, 2017, including three public performances on October 3rd and 4th. The complete opera will premiere during the 2018-2019 season.


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After supporting composer-orchestra residencies across the U.S. for 18 years through our grant program Music Alive, New Music USA and the League of American Orchestras asked the question: How can we remodel our program to transform relationships between composers and orchestras, and engage their stakeholders–artists, administrators, and audiences–in ways that address the twenty-first century cultural environment?

Our planning stage in FY16 involved conversations and convenings with more than 50 music directors, arts administrators, and composers, and in FY17 we launched a reinvented Music Alive, enabled by generous major support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The new three-year program prioritizes collaborative work and immersive experiences for composers, orchestra musicians and artistic leadership, and community members.

One of the main approaches of the program is to centrally embed the composer as an organizational member who is engaged with musicians and staff, involved in a range of creative projects, vital in retaining and growing audiences throughout the community, and at home in the local environment.

This past year, with the help of a five-person panel made up of orchestra administrators and composers in the field, we awarded three-year residencies to five composer-orchestra pairs. Over the course of the year, these groups worked collaboratively to develop their unique residency plans, which will be realized in the 2017-18 and 2018-19 seasons.

The 2017-2019 Music Alive residencies pairings are Lembit Beecher with Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Anna Clyne with Berkeley Symphony, Stacy Garrop with Champaign-Urbana Symphony Orchestra, Hannibal Lokumbe with Philadelphia Orchestra, and Jerod Tate with South Dakota Symphony Orchestra.


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Launched in 2016, the New York City New Music Impact Fund utilizes collaboration, connectivity, and New Music USA’s platform to advance the cultural position of New York’s D.I.Y. new music sector. In 2017 we added an additional nine organizations to the initial cohort of 24 awarded previously. All of these groups receive general operating support, as well as marketing assistance and tools, for the duration of the program. We also provide opportunities for residencies between a select group of ensembles and presenters.

Over the past year we saw the significant benefits that come from bringing these different groups together to collaborate. For example, the emerging ensemble TAK’s residency with So Percussion resulted in a range of opportunities. So Percussion provided TAK with access to their space for up to 80 hours of rehearsal time, and, they also provided five consultation sessions which covered areas of practical logistics subjects such as financial management, concert booking, marketing and publicity, grant applications, and applying for 501(c)3 status. In the upcoming year, we are exploring new ways for the organizations to collaborate with one another, leveraging their respective experiences and skills for the mutual benefit of all involved.

The New York City New Music Impact Fund is supported by a $495,000 three-year grant from The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund. The program continues our long history of support to small, DIY new music ensembles and venues in New York City while also helping the cohort of awarded organizations market themselves and the entire DIY new music field as a cohesive sector.

Our goal for the Impact Fund is to use this first round as a model for future, similar projects in other parts of the United States, that are customized through an iterative process that allows the grantees to participate in determining the project design.


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At New Music USA, we strongly believe in the importance of artists’ voices — through music as well as through the verbal or written exchange of ideas. While NewMusicBox is one way we amplify those voices on a regular basis, we were excited to be able to award a project grant to Option Music Salon at Chicago’s Experimental Sound Studio. Option is a weekly salon-style event which features a different artist each week, all chosen by artist-curators Ken Vandermark, Tim Daisy, and Andrew Clinkman. Our grant helped support Option’s 2017 series, which featured a wide variety of artists including Zeena Parkins, Ikue Mori, Chad Taylor, Joe McPhee, Mark Feldman, Jeremiah Cyerman, Jasper Stadhouders, Charles Rumback, Steve Marquette, Macie Stewart, and Charlie Kirchen.

As a part of the weekly salons, the musicians play a set followed by participation in an interview with another musician. During the interviews, audiences have the valuable chance to ask the artists questions. The entire event is recorded and streamed online every week for those who are not able to be physically there, and the interviews are archived and posted online.

Bassist William Parker described his experience being featured at the Option salon by saying:

The intimate conversation that followed was very important—I was able to meet and thank the audience that has been supporting my work the past twenty years… The music was excellently recorded and videotaped as well as streamed over the Internet to those who could not make the concert. All in all I think that ESS is invaluable to the Chicago music scene; in fact, it is a unique avenue and organization within the world of music preservation and presentation.

 


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In his NewMusicBox article “Who Is In the Club?,” Ohio-based composer Jeffrey Mumford provides insights into racial bias in the new music field, pointing out that the first barrier when dealing with this problem is people’s assumptions. One major way to move the dial, Mumford writes, is to shift our definition of the canon and its contributors. Specifically, he challenges classical radio stations and leaders of orchestras, opera companies, and other organizations that host performances, to program more works by black composers.

But Mumford also encourages practitioners of color to work hard to push past bias in order to affect change. Mumford calls on composers who have been preemptively stylistically pigeonholed to ignore these restrictions and defiantly “speak in their own voice.”

It seems that in certain parts of our culture we have not been “given permission” to embrace what touches us despite it not coinciding with that which others may define as “Black enough.” What is that actually? What causes this disconnect?

His call for constant diligence is not limited to those already active in the field, but includes young people:

I regularly tell my students to notice who is not included on a concert program as much as who is, and then to ask themselves why. Our work in this field is an ever-evolving odyssey which celebrates the best in us as a culture but sadly, if you were to peruse any given season’s offerings by major symphony orchestras or chamber music series, the voices of our artists in this business — particularly composers — are, if not absent, unjustifiably quiet.

Mumford hails change-makers such as Chi-chi Nwanoku, who founded Chineke, an orchestra made up of musicians of color, for creating opportunity not only for the members of the ensemble, but for inspiring those who may not yet be known and making them feel welcomed. But he warns that there is much more to be done.

There is much to applaud, but there is still much more to do. We must remain vigilant and undeterred. Our voices must be heard and added to the greater conversation to make the mix richer and deeper in resonance. As an African-American composer, I take my position and responsibility seriously. When I teach, I encourage all of my students to speak with their own voice and not succumb to the limitations others may try to give them. I believe that for too long, African Americans (and many others) have been pigeonholed (both by their own constituency and by others) by limited assumptions of the scope of their creative activity. I want to explode this. I believe that the artist must be a citizen aware of the context in which he/she lives, both politically and culturally. Then he or she must define his or her own world with frames of reference unique to him or herself and invite people into that world at appropriate times.


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At New Music USA we are excited to see new music being created and performed all across the United States, in big cities and small towns alike. We especially love it when communities embrace and demonstrate their belief in the importance of creativity by providing the support needed to make artistic endeavors flourish locally. In 2011, Blue Sage Center for the Arts in Paonia, Colorado, was able to raise $27,000 from members of their community to purchase a piano, which led to the beginning of the Blue Sage Concert Series. Now in its sixth year, the concert series brings high-quality performances and advanced music education opportunities to a small rural area in western Colorado.

This past year New Music USA awarded Blue Sage for a project that will bring the Splinter Reeds Ensemble to the Center to perform a new piece, Antenna Studies, by Paula Matthusen, and to engage in outreach activities in local schools. The grantees described the interactive nature of the commissioned work, which will bring together the intimacy of live performance with radio broadcasts through the live manipulation of radio signals emanating from the local public radio station:

Specifically, the group will perform alongside a separate and independent audio track that is broadcast simultaneous to their live performance. Remote audience members may tune in to the broadcast as normal, but those in the space may (through a combination of analog radios and streaming services playable on tablets and smartphones) play back the live audio track while Splinter Reeds performs, sustaining long tones that are punctuated by small noise bursts both in the written material and in the broadcast. In this way, the audience and the group build the piece together, developing shifting chordal material and sonic textures through these interactions.


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While historically Western classical musicians have often been considered the vehicle more than the focus of performance, in her NewMusicBox article, Jessica Aszodi examines contemporary approaches in concert music that place greater focus on the performing artist and “on the body as performing subject.”

Explorations of a performer’s physical life or subjectivity over, say, traditional instrumentality or vocality, has a deep history manifest in a range of artistic streams that flow through twentieth-century experimental traditions (Dada, Situationism, Fluxus, Cage, Cunningham, et al.), performance and installation art (Acconci, Moorman, Westerkamp, Cardiff, et al.), European and American art-music (Kagel, Berberian, Globokar, et al.), and opera (Stockhausen, Ashley, Lucier, et al.). Performers from theater, performance art, dance, and visual arts backgrounds have long embraced these influences. Concert music has been somewhat reluctant to get on board. Practitioners of serious music have often neglected to take their physical selves seriously as the material through which meaning is conveyed—beyond what might be required to produce the desired sounds and images for their notations, interpretations, or publicity photographs.

This way of working that accounts for the corporeal body was termed “The New Discipline” in 2016 by composer/performer Jennifer Walshe. Throughout her NewMusicBox article, Aszodi describes a number of artists who are working within The New Discipline and notes that the work of these artists is incredibly diverse and united only through their focus on the body as well as the music.

One of the strengths of this way of working is its flexibility. This is a music that can create situations for performers and audiences that utilize both immediate experience and signification in ways absolute music cannot. Through it we can explore new corners of the interior experience of music making, community kinetics, directionality, interpersonal relationships, sexual hierarchies, the specifics of site, or references to any cultural artifact you can tie down.

Despite the numerous benefits that can result from working this way, Aszodi warns that it has to be done seriously and conscientiously and that there will be a learning curve for musicians who have not thought about this aspect of performance before:

Musicians are trained to critique and evaluate “music” but our criteria for judging the effective communication of the bodies, lights, spaces, images, movement, and taction required for this *music* is far less well developed. As we go about solving our musical-theatrical problems, musicians should accept the challenge of ensuring the extra-musical work we do is as nuanced, connected, and effective as the stuff we’ve all been trained for.


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In so many ways, Eleanor Cory’s artistic approach reflects current trends in new music — it embraces a broad artistic practice that draws on a range of styles and disciplines. During her interview with NewMusicBox Co-Editor Frank J. Oteri, she described the various sources of inspiration she turns to when composing, including attending other people’s concerts, reading and writing poetry, talking with friends, and simply asking questions, among others. She explained that this wide range of inspiration directly impacts her style of composing:

I think that by nature as a composer, I like to put things that don’t immediately seem to belong together into the same piece. From [listening to] one piece I may get a dramatic shape, and from something else I might just get some great chords. … I’m curious and, by nature, I’m always asking people questions. People say, “You ask too many questions!” Sometimes it’s interpreted as butting in or stepping on someone’s privacy. I just like to be aware and maybe I’ll get some ideas. Maybe I’ll try something that’s out of my box.

Cory’s formal training with teachers such as Charles Wuorinen and Meyer Kupferman gave her a strong background in the 12-tone method of composing. After graduating, she abandoned rigorous use of the 12-tone method, and began using a style that allowed
her to create exactly the music she wants — music that is influenced by the jazz that she loves and grew up listening to. She recounts:

A piece of mine was on a concert at Merkin Hall and a piece by Milton was on the same concert. At the intermission, we were on stage talking about our pieces. At one point, he looked at me and he said, “What I really like in your music is the bebop jazz influence.” He knows that music so well. And this whole part of me just relaxed. I can do this! It’s what I really want to do, because I heard this music when I was teenager. I lived in New Jersey and my brother would bring me with his friends to all those clubs, like Birdland, so I had all that music in my ear. But you couldn’t do that at Columbia University. Suddenly I found these kind of overlappings. I could go from one to the other… My ear was in both places, but they were coming together.

Cory is also an active poet who has recently finished a book of poetry. During the talk, she discussed the overlap between poetry and music, illustrating her point with an example drawn from her own work:

I think I was hearing the music a little bit as I was writing the poem. I think I knew my instruments, and I was just hearing a line every now and then as I was writing the poem. You know, the violin would like to do this.


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Since its establishment more than eighteen years ago, NewMusicBox has been driven by a core commitment to providing members of the new music community with a platform from which to speak thoughtfully about the truths they see. Following the 2016 presidential election, NewMusicBox ran a series entitled Speak Now which asked music makers to share what they were thinking about — both in their roles as artists and community members. We wanted to hear a range of viewpoints and felt that it was natural and organic for us to provide a place to share personal views of the moment at hand.

In his Speak Now essay, “Our Job As Composers Has Now Changed,” composer/journalist Mohammed Fairouz argues for the importance of creativity, creation, and innovation:

There’s a lot of talk about opposing extremism and intolerance in the world and it’s fine to oppose violence and destruction through developing a counter-narrative or developing a cogent military strategy (those are vital things), but the ultimate response of resistance to violence and destruction is creation. It’s a simple statement of fact that creation is the polar opposite to destruction. That means building a city or composing a symphony or sending a mission to Mars. Creation and invention are the ultimate “show me” forms of opposition to violence.
Music and the arts and poetry are essentially a training field for innovation and empathy.

Later in the essay, Fairouz describes how the work of composers is even more important now than it was before, not for furthering certain ideals or messages, but simply because of the value that comes from unmitigated self-expression:

Previously our profession was important. Today it is existentially vital. This is not a call to propaganda. It is a call to truth. My aim here is not to promote a message but to urge you all to promote an infinite variety of messages and to never shy away from self-expression.

I’ll end … with President Kennedy:

“Artists are not engineers of the soul. It may be different elsewhere. But democratic society — in it, the highest duty of the writer, the composer, the artist is to remain true to himself and to let the chips fall where they may. In serving his vision of the truth, the artist best serves his nation. And the nation which disdains the mission of art invites the fate of Robert Frost’s hired man, the fate of having ‘nothing to look backward to with pride, and nothing to look forward to with hope.’”


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Throughout his 40-year career, Rennie Harris has been instrumental in translating and bringing street styles of hip hop dance to the stage as important and valued works of art. In fact, the US Department of Education named Harris a leading ambassador for the art of hip hop dance. At New Music USA, our community includes artists practicing a wide range of music and dance, and this year we awarded Rennie Harris a project grant for Lifted, a story of redemption told through the rhythms of hip-hop and the spiritual vocals of gospel.

Lifted, which is loosely based on the story of Oliver Twist, follows a young black man who, through various trials and tribulations, is embraced and supported by his church community. The music for the piece, which was composed by Raphael Xavier and Darrin Roos and overseen by music and script consultants Steven Sapp and Mildred Ruiz-Sapp, combines gospel vocals over composed house music. This stylistic combination demonstrates the historical continuity between both musical expressions, as described on the project page for Lifted, “within both cultures, there is the collective energy of the entire community, the physical transformation of protracted dancing (and in the case of gospel music, singing), and the vital aliveness of that heightened state.” For Lifted, Harris choreographed the piece in a style called rhythm house, which is incredibly fast to match the beat of the music. Lifted will tour to different cities across the country, and when possible, the gospel music will be sung by a local choir.


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In the best cases, the outcomes from a single project grant can provide opportunity and influence to the field long after the funded project itself has ended. This year we were especially excited to award a group that was formed as the result of a festival we supported a few years ago.

Screaming Plastic is a free improvisation band based out of Omaha, Nebraska. The quartet includes cello, percussion, guitar, and electronics and also features projected visuals. The four members met while they were all getting their undergraduate degrees at the University of Nebraska in Omaha but didn’t really consider joining forces as a band until three of them participated in the 2015 Omaha Under the Radar Festival, which received a project grant from New Music USA. Following these performances, a fourth classmate joined them and Screaming Plastic was born.

The band’s music draws from a range of styles, including “contemporary classical, noise, ambient, free music, doom, [and] drone” among others and is unusual as far as what other musicians are currently doing in Omaha. In fact, the band’s mission is to bring more difficult and challenging art to the city. The members are all committed to remaining in Omaha because they feel they can provide more value there than in other cities that have many artists producing experimental works.

This year, New Music USA awarded Screaming Plastic a project grant to record their first album at ARC Studios in Omaha with Ben Brodin. Using this recording, the band is hoping to engage new audiences in Omaha with their experimental, improvisatory style.

 


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Sign & Sing is a nonprofit performance program that integrates American Sign Language (ASL) and classical music in order to elevate storytelling in an operatic and recital environment that promotes inclusion and understanding. The founders of Sign & Sing noted that many musical communities — including rock, hip hop, and musical theater — had begun to seriously consider deaf and hard-of-hearing audiences by including ASL performers at their concerts but realized that this was not happening with opera.

Sign & Sing was created as an organization to help fill this missing link. Its founders began by interpreting existing music, but their new project, Visible Speech, which was awarded a project grant this year, goes one step further by commissioning music pieces that incorporate both English and ASL and are written by and for the Deaf community. This unprecedented piece will be composed by Richard Einhorn, a deaf composer who uses hearing aids and assisted listening technology. The English and ASL libretto will be written by Katherine Dubbs, a founder of Sign & Sing. Visible Speech is an exploration of communication, listening, human connection, and history. The title of the opera stems from Alexander Melville Bell’s educational tool and language system and also encapsulates the opera’s focus on varied communicative techniques.

In addition to creating music that is more accessible and written for a group of people often not considered by musical creators, the organization also wants to “further educat[e] the public on accessibility as an elevation
of storytelling.”


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In October 2016, New Music USA collaborated with the Chicago Ear Taxi Festival to produce special content live and online that would enhance, highlight, and celebrate the unique and diverse community of artists participating in the programming.

As a part of our series on Chicago new music in the lead up to the 2016 Ear Taxi Festival, Chicago-based composer, educator, and writer Michael Lewanski contributed an “insider’s” long-form essay on why people outside of Chicago seem to be so interested in the city’s new music scene.

What comes to mind when I describe the character of Chicago new music are words like “provisional” and “transient” and “conditional” and “contingent” and “fragmented.”

A quintessential work of Chicago new music is something like George Lewis’s Assemblage, which he wrote for Ensemble Dal Niente (which I conduct) in 2013. It’s quintessential to Chicago new music because it was written for the Bowling Green New Music Festival by a Chicago-born improviser/scholar/composer/computer musician living in New York for a new music ensemble started ten years ago by a bunch of mostly students without jobs, composed in a style that references many other musics, and cast in a form that encourages the listener to “catch the bus and go along for the ride.” Thus, the city of Chicago is essential to the work’s creation, but its presence cannot be readily pointed to. The essence of its Chicago-ness, if one may say so, is the not-exactly-there-ness of Chicago.

Lewanski describes that the Chicago new music community is in ways defined by contradiction: it’s there but it’s also not there, it is “highly cosmopolitan and deeply provinicial.” Lewanski also argues that the finances behind Chicago new music play a significant role in what the community looks like. He describes how there are many musicians in Chicago but not many full-time jobs, so it’s hard to make a living as a musician. Despite the challenges associated with this, it allows artists to develop authentically without significant outside pressure.

Throughout the article, Lewanski gives examples of ensembles, pieces, and events that he feels embody the state of Chicago new music. That being said, in the conclusion he notes:

Here I feel that I have reached a satisfying conclusion; I have sketched the essence, or the rather, the process, of Chicago new music’s transient state…On the one hand, everything I write above is consonant with my experience and so deeply felt that I’ve restlessly redefined my career trajectory because I feel inspired by the exciting work I see on a daily basis… On the other hand, it’s painfully clear that there’s an awful lot I’m leaving out. I’m aware that I haven’t mentioned a number of Chicago new music organizations: Chicago Composers Orchestra, Fulcrum Point New Music Project, Eighth Blackbird, Contempo, CSO’s MusicNOW… There are vast numbers of complicating factors, and only the embrace of these will give us a fleeting glimpse of the reality of the situation: that there is not a unified whole to be grasped.


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In addition to the special NewMusicBox theme week about new music in Chicago, NewMusicBox co-editors Frank J. Oteri and Molly Sheridan hosted a Chicago-focused edition of NewMusicBox LIVE! as part of the Ear Taxi Festival. The event featured three artists with deep Chicago ties — Andy Costello, Shulamit Ran, and Nicole Mitchell — telling stories, with the aid of music, about their lives. Video documentation of their unique presentations was posted on NewMusicBox throughout December.

Andy Costello’s story manifested as a playful exploration of communication and the power of the unexpected in performance. Costello, who is a pianist, composer, educator, and actor, utilized short performance pieces drawn from multiple authors including Samuel Beckett, John Cage, Gertrude Stein, Georges Aperghis, and William Shakespeare and followed a through line of “masking the mode of your communication.” He explained:

Music is about that a lot of the time. We use words to speak to one another and we use music to communicate on a different level in a different way, so this is something I’m exploring in my work.

While Nicole Mitchell now teaches and lives in California, she spent her young adulthood in Chicago and transformed and was transformed by the city. She had been a member of the legendary AACM (the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) since 1995 and served as its first female president. Mitchell structured her segment around the idea of “endless possibilities” and how that idea has influenced her life and the goals and content of her art. She first encountered this idea in her mother’s painting, where she created “things that were a mixture of things that existed and things that never existed.” But later her notions of improvisation, musical genres, and what it was possible to do with the flute were all dramatically expanded by artists she met in Chicago. At the end of her presentation, Mitchell played a flute solo, displaying the idea of endless possibilities through a range of extended techniques.

To conclude the event, composer/pianist Shulamit Ran took the stage. Born and raised in Israel, she has been an important member of the Windy City’s music community for five decades. Ran began her presentation by declaring that:

Music is magic…it is abstract. It is not made out of words (except when words form the sound material), and it is not about visual imagery, and yet it speaks! …Music seems to have the capacity to bring time to a standstill. It’s an illusion, but at the same time it’s a miracle.

Later, Ran recounted the genesis of two of her compositions. The first was her 2010 solo viola work Perfect Storm (excerpts were performed by violist Doyle Armbrust) which takes, as a point of departure, a brief solo viola phrase found in Luciano Berio’s Folksongs. The other was her 1969 song cycle based on Nelly Sachs’s collection of Holocaust-themed poetry O The Chimneys. As Ran recounted, the work was haunted by her memory of hearing bells on the tragic day that John F. Kennedy was assassinated — a day that was originally going to have been a joyous one for her, as she had been scheduled to play her Capriccio for piano and orchestra with the New York Philharmonic under the direction of Leonard Bernstein. But according to Ran, music’s greatest power is its ability to transcend whatever is its source of inspiration and to communicate to listeners in a visceral way that is unlike any other medium.


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There’s something exciting about hearing an unexpected assemblage of instruments, whether it’s new and unexpected or a twist on a classic. Hearing familiar sounds in a new context can create completely new sound worlds. Such is the case with the Sakura Cello Quintet. They explain:

The repertoires for cello quartet and large cello ensemble are vast, but we are interested in developing the limited repertoire for cello quintet, which retains the intimacy of a quartet that is lost in a large ensemble, but has an added richness supplied by the fifth cello.

This year, we were excited to be able to award the Sakura Cello Quintet a project grant which allowed them to commission a new work from the Los Angeles-based composer Donald Crockett in their attempt to create a rich repertoire for cello quintet. The piece will premier at the Carlsbad Festival in August 2018 and will later be performed at USC during the 2018-19 season and at the Sunset ChamberFest in June 2019.

Support for this project came from a member of New Music Connect: A Network for Friends of New Music through New Music USA. New Music Connect is a network of new music enthusiasts that brings members together with fellow patrons as well as composers, performers, producers, presenters, audiences, and more in order to share knowledge, experiences, and points of view, hear and engage with new projects and artists, learn about new trends, and make a positive impact on the new music field. Additionally, members of New Music Connect have the opportunity to add support to projects that have gone through our panel process, as one member chose to do for the Sakura Quintet’s project. Although New Music Connect is still a young program, we have already been able to distribute nearly $75,000 more dollars to artists than we would have been able to otherwise. Over the past year, Connect members have traveled together with staff to hear and meet artists at a number of events across the country including the Ear Taxi Festival and Omaha Under the Radar. The connections made during these experiences have been deep and rewarding and have led to supportive relationships between artists and donors that have resulted in support for future endeavors.


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Advocating for new music and the community of performers, composers, and appreciators who make up the field is the overarching theme of New Music USA’s work. Through our grantmaking programs, our media programs, and the rest of the work we do, we seek to create a stronger, more robust new music community and to advocate for and advance the position of the new music field at large.
In addition to our programs that advance the field, we also participate in more traditional forms of advocacy in order to promote American new music both nationally and internationally. We represent the United States as members of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), for which our Composer Advocate Frank J. Oteri serves on the Executive Committee, as well as the International Association of Music Information Centres (IAMIC), for which our President and CEO Ed Harsh serves as Secretary, with Frank serving as the Chair of the Communications Committee.

Ed also serves as Secretary of the Performing Arts Alliance, the national policy advocate, leadership forum, and learning network for America’s nonprofit performing arts organizations, artists, and allies. In this capacity he has been actively engaged in the Alliance’s work in Washington, D.C. this year. For example, he took part as one of a record-breaking number of leaders participating in visits to Capitol Hill as part of Arts Advocacy Day in March 2017.

Over the past year, Frank traveled to numerous places in the U.S. to attend conferences/music festivals/new music reading sessions and to advocate for new American music. He served as a moderator for EarShot events with the Buffalo Philharmonic in Buffalo, New York, and with the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra in Indianapolis, Indiana. Frank was also a guest speaker at Indiana University’s “Well-Advised Luncheon” Series in Bloomington, Indiana, and co-moderated an event with Director of Content and NewMusicBox Co-Editor, Molly Sheridan at the Ear Taxi Festival in Chicago, Illinois. Frank was a guest speaker at the Decolonizing Music Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, was a mentor for new attendees at the Chamber Music America National Conference in New York, New York, and was a panelist at the Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Finally, Frank was a moderator at the Classical:NEXT festival in Rotterdam, Netherlands, and at the Music Publishers Association Annual Meeting in Redbury, New York.

Additionally, Scott Winship, our Director of Grantmaking, gave a talk to the Kresge Fellows in Detroit, appeared twice on the “Music Publishing Podcast,” and served on a panel for the New York State Association of Performing Arts Professionals.

New Music USA’s grantmaking staff attended this year’s League of American Orchestras’ conference in Detroit, Michigan, and helped lead a session titled “Activating and Nurturing Community Alliances.” Multiple staff members attended the third edition of the New Music Gathering, in Bowling Green, Ohio, with Ed presenting as part of a panel titled “Using Software to Support Artists.”


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Few things better symbolize contained potential energy than a large dam. Just by looking at one you can feel the quiet strength needed to hold back tons of water. Inspired by the Mansfield Dam outside of Austin, Texas, and presented as a part of the 13th annual Fusebox Festival, line upon line percussion created a project called Potential which was awarded a New Music USA project grant this year.

The performance of Potential took place in front of the steep downstream wall of the Mansfield Dam and featured line upon line percussion playing gargantuan pieces of timber and steel that normally would not be possible to perform in a concert setting due to space limitations. In addition, Rosalyn Nasky created choreography for seven dancers/actors who performed around the percussionists. The performance, which took place near sundown, featured lighting design from Natalie George that exemplified “the many ways light and shadow can lend to performative moments.” Performances of Potential were free to the public as a part of the Fusebox Festival.


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There are thousands of composers living and working across the United States today, and each one of them is a unique individual with their own history, background, interests, and stories. Through our online magazine NewMusicBox, we’ve built a platform where artists can speak in their own voices not only about their music but also about their lives and all of the factors that make them who they are and inform their music.

Over the past year, a number of composers have written in-depth posts exploring how they put their lives together. For example, in September, Ed Windels contributed a series of posts about his decision to have a day job and compose after work and on days off (what he calls being a “5-to-9 composer”). Throughout the series, he provides tips and advice on how to compose while also having a day job. Perhaps more importantly, he also gives advice about how to embrace this approach to being a composer and not feel marginalized compared to those who have decided to compose full-time.

In counterpoint to Ed Windels’ posts, a few months later Dennis Tobenski wrote about his decision to quit his day job and become a full-time composer. In his series of posts, he discusses the extensive preparation he did before making the change, the problems that still arose despite the preparation, and what he did in response. Throughout the series of four articles, Tobenski provides first-hand advice as well as resources for those who are thinking about freelancing full-time.

All musicians have to make many decisions about how to structure their lives throughout their careers. Presenting different perspectives on how to approach this can assist all of us — musicians and appreciators alike — in making informed decisions about how to arrange our lives around our passions.


{Re}HAPPENING featuring Third Coast Percussion
Black Mountain, NC

2017 Festival of Contemporary Music
Lenox, MA

35th Anniversary World Premiere with Zakir Hussain
San Francisco, CA

4 New Commissions for Saxophone & Piano
Rochester, NY

A Period of Animate Existence
Philadelphia, PA

Abraham in Flames (opera)
San Francisco, CA

Acting Like a Pianist, Volume 1: Rzewski’s ‘De Profundis’ and ‘Marriage’
Lawrence, KS

AfterImage
Brooklyn, NY

ALARM
Los Angeles, CA

Alternative Guitar Summit
Big Indian, NY

American Encounters: Augusta Read Thomas
Eugene, OR

American Music Festival 2017: Water Music NY
Troy, NY

Andy Warhol’s Bleu Movie
New York, NY

‘Antenna Studies’ (2018) for Splinter Reeds at Blue Sage Center for the Arts
Paonia, CO

Bang on a Can’s ROAD TRIP
Brooklyn, NY

Bienvenue
New York City, NY

Breath Beneath
New York, NY

Chaosflöte
Orlando, FL

Chris Rogerson Clarinet Quintet Commission
Portland, OR

Composition of “Nicosia Etudes”
Ithaca, NY

Contemporary Composer Residency
Brunswick, ME

Cordelia – a monodrama by Neil Rolnick for Deviant Septet and Mellissa Hughes
New York City, NY

Derek Bermel Interarts Residency
Chautauqua, NY

Diametrically Composed
New York, NY

Dispatches from the Unknown
New York City, NY

Donald Crockett commission for SAKURA cello quintet
Los Angeles, CA

Dreams of Water Beyond One’s Depth
New York, NY

Each flows into the other
Denver, CO

Echo Exodus
Kassel, Germany and Athens, Greece

Eleven Eleven
Austin, TX

Everyday People Everyday Actions
Chicago, IL

Falling Out
New York, NY

FLESH – The Commune
Miami, FL

Førage/solo piano works by Tim Berne performed by Matt Mitchell
Brooklyn, NY

Frantic Beauty
Brooklyn, NY

Free Jazz at the Sanctuary
Troy, NY

From Our Roots
Syracuse, NY

Grant Park Music Festival Presents a World Premiere by Aaron Jay Kernis
Chicago, IL

HARBORED
New York, NY

Harmonia: 10th Anniversary Commission by Steven Sametz
Buffalo, NY

Identity Theft
San Francisco, CA

ILLEGAL SUNSHINE
Seattle, WA

Industrial Foundations – An Interdisciplinary Project
Albuquerque, NM

Infoxication: An Interdisciplinary Performance Inspired by the Information Age
New York, NY

inside voice
Hoboken, NJ

Inspiring Creativity in Kansas Prisons
Lansing, KS

Isfahan
Pittsburgh, PA

Jamie Baum Septet+ Project
New York City, NY

Learning to Compose Together
Honolulu, HI

Lifted
Washington, DC

LIKE
New York, NY

Love Wounds
Chicago, IL

Mannequins
Brooklyn, NY

Memory Palace
Brooklyn, NY

Moss
New York, NY

Music in the American Wild: Trios
Rochester, NY

Native American Composer Apprentice Project (NACAP)
Various locations, AZ

NeverEnd: a new work for Periapsis Music and Dance by Norbert De La Cruz III and Harry Stafylakis
Brooklyn, NY

New Commission from Aleksandra Vrebalov
New York, NY

New Groove Meets Old Groove: Soul Inscribed at Woodstock
Bethel, NY

New Music for Flute Quartet
Boston, MA

New Water Music
New Orleans, LA

New Work For Percussion & Live-Electronics
Chicago, IL

NYCEMF 2018 Recording Project
New York, NY

Occupy- A site-specific journey through an urban garden
San Francisco, CA

OPTION Music Salon at Experimental Sound Studio
Chicago, IL

OUTLIERS: a world premiere recording of 11 works written for Sybarite5
Brooklyn, NY

Passage
New York, NY

Pepperland, A New Work by Mark Morris
Liverpool, UK

Peter Evans Septet
Buffalo, NY

Potential
Austin, TX

Power in Sound: The Music of Galina Ustvolskaya
Chicago, IL

Project RAu
Boston, MA

R[o/u]LE(s) II
New York City, NY

Recording Three Years of Light II
Troy, NY

Remembrances
Bloomfield, NJ

Requiem for Journal Square
Jersey City, NJ

Residue
Brooklyn, NY

Respire
Chicago, IL

RICHARD PREVITE, NIAGARA FALLS 1959
Hudson, NY

Screaming Plastic
Omaha, NE

SIGN & SING – VISIBLE SPEECH
New York, NY

Songbook
Jersey City, NJ

Sorrows and Triumphs
New York, NY

Spektral Quartet + Samuel Adams: On Distance
Chicago, IL

Sri Moonshine Music Festival 2017
Camptonville, CA

Strange in Other Ways
Austin, TX

String Theory: Del Sol String Quartet & Jeffrey Mumford in Concert and Masterclass
Washington, DC

Tamar-Kali’s Demon Fruit Blues
New York, NY

The [Switch~ Ensemble] Upstate New York Tour: Concerts, Residencies, and Recordings
Buffalo, NY

THE AFTER TIME
Boston, MA

The FORGIVENESS Project
New York, NY

The Jazz Gallery Fellowship
New York, NY

The Monomyth
Long Island City, NY

The Music of George Crumb
New Rochelle, NY

THE SET UP: ISLAND GHOST SLEEP PRINCESS TIME STORY SHOW
New York, NY

There will come soft rains
Los Angeles, CA

THERE’S BLOOD AT THE WEDDING: Songs for Lorca
New York City, NY

Third Sound: Heard in Havana
New York, NY

Thirst
Seattle, WA

Time’s Illusion: stories in sound
Lancaster, PA

TREEFALLS: NEW MUSIC PRESENTS VICKY CHOW IN CONCERT
Spartanburg, SC

UNTITLED TOUCH
New York, NY

Vicksburg Project
Vicksburgh, MS

We Bring Flowers
Amherst, MA

World Premiere of John Musto’s “Rhoda and the Fossil Hunt” at the AMNH
New York, NY

Written in Water – National Tour
Minneapolis, MN


10 Hairy Legs
New York, NY

Samuel Adams
Chicago, IL

Alonzo King LINES Ballet
San Francisco, CA

Austin New Music Co-op
Austin, TX

AXIS Dance Company
San Francisco, CA

Bang on a Can
Brooklyn, NY

Jamie Baum
New York City, NY

Becky Radway Dance Projects
Brooklyn, NY

Preston Beebe
Chicago, IL

tim berne
Brooklyn, NY

Emily Berry
New York, NY

Bethel Woods Center for the Arts
Bethel, NY

Blue Sage Center for the Arts
Paonia, CO

Linda Bouchard
San Francisco, CA

Michelle Boulé
Long Island City, NY

Bowdoin International Music Festival
Brunswick, ME

Bridge Records
New Rochelle, NY

Buglisi Dance Theatre
New York, NY

CabinFever
Chicago, IL

Camptonville Community Center
Camptonville, CA

Chamber Music Northwest
Portland, OR

Devesh Chandra
Syracuse & Clinton, NY

Chautauqua Institution
Chautauqua, NY

Chicago Ustvolskaya Festival
Chicago, IL

Bryan Christian
Denver, CO

Heather Christian
New York, NY

wendy clinard
Chicago, IL

Seth Cluett
Hoboken, NJ

Danmari – Yass Hakoshima Movement Theatre
Westminster Arts Center
Bloomfield, NJ

Ian David Rosenbaum
Brooklyn, NY

Nicholas DeMaison
Troy, NY

Deviant Septet
New York City, NY

Cobus du Toit
Amherst, MA

Jason Eckardt
New York, NY

Ben Eisenberger
Omaha, NE

Emissary Quartet
Boston, MA

Eugene Symphony Association
Eugene, OR

Sarah Frisof
Lansing, KS

Guillermo Galindo
Kassel, Germany and Athens, Greece

Kate Gentile
Brooklyn, NY

Grand Canyon Music Festival
Various locations, AZ

Grant Park Music Festival
Chicago, IL

Hallwalls
Buffalo, NY

Harlem Stage
New York, NY

Harmonia Chamber Singers
Buffalo, NY

Rennie Harris
Washington, DC

joel harrison
New York and Big Indian, NY

Hudson Hall at the historic Hudson Opera House
Hudson, NY

Inner Arts Initiative
New York City, NY

Takuma Itoh
Honolulu, HI

Emlyn Johnson
Rochester, NY

Jenny Olivia Johnson
Boston, MA

José Limón Dance Foundation, Inc.
New York, NY

Michael Kirkendoll
Lawrence, KS

Joan La Barbara
New York, NY

Latitude 49
Chicago, IL

LEIMAY
Brooklyn, NY

Levine Music
Washington, DC

line upon line percussion
Austin, TX

Shih-Wei Lo
New York City, NY

Allison Loggins-Hull
New York, NY

Mabou Mines
Vicksburg, MS

Pamela Madsen
Los Angeles, CA

Marion Walker
Seattle, WA

Mark Morris Dance Group
Liverpool, UK

mediasanctuary
Troy, NY

Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center
Black Mountain, NC

NakedEye Ensemble
Lancaster, PA

New Mexico Contemporary Ensemble
Albuquerque, NM

New Orleans Airlift
New Orleans, LA

Nimbus Dance Works
Jersey City, NJ

NYCEMF
New York, NY

On Site Opera
New York, NY

Periapsis Music and Dance
Brooklyn, NY

Phantom Limb Company
New York, NY

PHYSICAL PLASTIC
Los Angeles, CA

Phil Pierick
Rochester, NY

Pig Iron Theatre Company
Philadelphia, PA

PRISM Quartet, Inc.
Philadelphia, PA and New York City, NY

Project RAu with: Prometheus Dance/Korhan Basaran and Ensemble RAu and Syrian composer Kinan Azmeh
Boston, MA

SAKURA Quintet
Los Angeles, CA

Ragamala Dance Company
Minneapolis, MN

Evis Sammoutis
Ithaca, NY

Danielle Eva Schwob
New York, NY

Seattle Modern Orchestra
Seattle, WA

Jennifer Sherburn
Austin, TX

Shua Group
Jersey City, NJ

Sign & Sing
New York, NY

Edward Simon
New York, NY

Skysaver Productions
New York City, NY

Stefanie Batten Bland/Company SBB
New York City, NY

Stephen Petronio Company
New York, NY

Sybarite5
Brooklyn, NY

Albany Symphony
Troy, NY

Niloufar Talebi
San Francisco, CA

Tanglewood Music Center
Lenox, MA

Alexey Taran
Miami, FL

the [Switch~ Ensemble]
Annandale-on-Hudson, Woodstock, Ithaca, Rochester, and Buffalo NY

The Jazz Gallery
New York, NY

The String Orchestra of Brooklyn
Brooklyn, NY

Third Sound
New York, NY

Treefalls
Spartanburg, SC

Reza Vali
Pittsburgh, PA

Ken Vandermark
Chicago, IL

WCV, Inc. / Wally Cardona
New York, NY

Benjamin Whiting
Orlando, FL

ZviDance (ZGD Inc.)
New York, NY


Adam Abeshouse
Pelham, NY

Afinidad
New York, NY

Andy Akiho
New York, NY

Kyle Walker Akins
Reno, NV

Fabian Almazan
New York, NY

Timo Andres
Brooklyn, NY

Ingrid Arauco
Wilmington, DE

Kinan Azmeh
Brooklyn, NY

Katherine Balch

Rusty Banks
Lancaster, PA

Doug Barber

Korhan Basaran

Kathryn Bates

Ashley Bathgate
New York City, NY

Jeff Beal

Michael Begay

Eve Beglarian
New York, NY

Richard Belcastro

Paula Jeanine Bennett

Derek Bermel

Rafiq Bhatia
Brooklyn, NY

Michael Bisio

Ellen Breakfield-Glick

George Brooks
Berkeley, CA

Kyle Bruckmann
Oakland, CA

Kenji Bunch
Portland, OR

Taylor Ho Bynum
New Haven, CT

Clara Byom
Albuquerque, NM

Christopher Cerrone
Brooklyn, NY

Raven Chacon

Chicago Fringe Opera
Chicago, IL

Yiannis Christofides

Melody Chua

Nels Cline

Valerie Coleman

David Coll
Oakland, CA

Contemporaneous
New York, NY

Pedro Cortes

David Crowell

Da Capo Chamber Players

Norbert De La Cruz III
New York City, NY

Mark DeChiazza
New York, NY

Del Sol String Quartet
San Francisco, CA

Julia Den Boer

Chris Dingman
Brooklyn, NY

Documenta 14

Dover Quartet

Katherine Dubbs

Brigette Dunn-Korpela

Elizabeth Dworkin

Eric Einhorn

Richard Einhorn

Susan Ellinger

En Garde Arts

Nomi Epstein
Chicago, IL

John Escreet
New York, NY

Reena Esmail
Los Angeles, CA

Experimental Sound Studio
Chicago, IL

Eamonn Farrell

Lauren Flanigan

Stephanie Fleischmann
Brooklyn, NY

Brad Foley

Colin Fowler

Miguel Frasconi

Fred Frith

Reiko Fueting
New York, NY

Fusebox

Kurt Galván

Stephan Garin

Natalie George

Whitney George
Brooklyn, NY

Florent Ghys
Brooklyn, NY

Peter Gilbert

Jeremy Gill
Boston, MA

Michael Gordon
New York, NY

Jacob Greenberg
Brooklyn, NY

Jacob Greenfeld

Shanna Gutierrez
Evanston, IL

Yotam Haber
New York, NY

Saad Haddad
New York, NY

Nathan Hall
Denver, CO

Mary Halvorson

Vicente Hansen

Dalton Harris

Michael Harrison
Yonkers, NY

Benjamin Heller

Rebekah Heller
Brooklyn, NY

Tal Heller

Troy Herion
Brooklyn, NY

Jennifer Higdon
Philadelphia, PA

Cory Hills
Los Angeles, CA

Jeffrey Hirshfield

Paul Damian Hogan

Aisan Hoss

Timothy Hsu

Jason Hwang
Morris Plains, NJ

Imani Winds
New York, NY

International Foundation for Contemporary Music

Irritable Hedgehog Music
Kansas City, MO

Mara Isaacs
Princeton, NJ

Ethan Iverson
Brooklyn, NY

JACK Quartet
New York, NY

Ashley Jackson

Elana Jacobs

Alexa Jarvis

Christopher Jones

Karen Kandel

Raja Feather Kelly

Aaron Jay Kernis

Daniel Ketter

Keith Kirchoff

Tonia Ko
Ithaca, NY

Lia Kohl

Stephan Koplowitz

Jennifer Lacey

Esther Lamneck

David Lang
New York, NY

Kestrel Leah
Los Angeles, CA

Andrew McKenna Lee
Brooklyn, NY

R. Andrew Lee
Denver, CO

Michael Lewanski
Chicago, IL

Mimi Lien
Brooklyn, NY

line upon line percussion
Austin, TX

David Liptak
Rochester, NY

Zack Lober
Brooklyn, NY

Mark London

Los Angeles Percussion Quartet
Los Angeles, CA

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra
New Orleans, LA

Stefanie Lubkowski
Boston, MA

Lage Lund

Son Lux
New York, NY

Elysa Marden

Kate Maroney

Gabriela Martinez

Paula Matthusen

MCA Chicago
Chicago, IL

Geoffrey McDonald

David Clay Mettens
Rochester, NY

Andreas Meyer
Long Island City, NY

Jessica Meyer
New York, NY

Matt Mitchell

Stephan Moore
Pawtucket, RI

Jeffrey Mumford
Oberlin, OH

John Musto

Rosalyn Nasky

National Sawdust
Brooklyn, NY

New Morse Code
New York, NY

SYZYGY New Music

Karola Obermueller

Oktaven Audio
Yonkers, NY

Tawnie Olson
New Haven, CT

Zeena Parkins

Monica Pearce
Toronto, CA

Liz Pearse

Sylvia Pengilly

Daniel Pesca
Rochester, NY

Matt Petty

Paola Prestini

Bobby Previte
New York, NY

Gavin Price

Ren Putz

Roy Rallo

Aparna Ramaswamy
Minneapolis, MN

Ashwini Ramaswamy
Minneapolis, MN

Ranee Ramaswamy
Minneapolis, MN

RASA 360

Lucas Rathke

Jared Redmond

Amadeus Regucera
Oakland, CA

Michael Rhoades

Gyan Riley
Brooklyn, NY

Neil Rolnick
New York, NY

Daniel Bernard Roumain
New York, NY

Mildred Ruiz-Sapp

Roya Sachs

Sam Sadigursky

Erik Sanko
New York, NY

Steven Sapp

Matt Sargent
Buffalo, NY

Christin Schillinger

Andrew Schneider

Megan Schubert
New York, NY

Rob Schwimmer

Madeleine Shapiro
New York, NY

Elliott Sharp
New York, NY

Jaleel Shaw

Zach Sheets

Joanne Shenandoah

Brad Shepik

Justin Sherburn

Kim Sherman
New York, NY

Nadia Sirota
Brooklyn, NY

Jessie Marion Smith
Seattle, WA

Sarah Kirkland Snider
Princeton, NJ

Spektral Quartet
Chicago, IL

Splinter Reeds
San Francisco, CA

Harry Stafylakis
New York, NY

Ingrid Stölzel
Kansas City, MO

Bryan Strimpel

Ike Sturm
New York, NY

Dasha Sur

Elisabeth Svenningsen

Satoshi Takeishi

Tina Tallon
San Diego, CA

Tamar-kali

Curtis Tamm

Chad Taylor

Texas Choral Consort
Austin, TX

The Chicago Philharmonic Society
Chicago, IL

The Crossing
Philadelphia, PA

The Living Earth Show
San Francisco, CA

Third Coast Percussion
Chicago, IL

Augusta Read Thomas
Chicago, IL

Jason Thorpe Buchanan
New York, NY

Timucua Arts Foundation

Spencer Topel
Hanover, NH

Dan Trueman

Monique Truong

Fay Victor
Brooklyn, NY

Dan Visconti

VisionIntoArt
New York, NY

Aleksandra Vrebalov
New York City, NY

Brittany Wait

Anna-Louise Walton

Thomas Weaver

Anna Webber
Brooklyn, NY

Travis Weller
Austin, TX

Darron West

Quintan Ana Wikswo

Julia Wolfe

Seth Parker Woods
New York, NY

Giselle Wyers and Solaris Vocal Ensemble

Tuce Yasak

Phillip Ying

Jeffrey Zeigler
Brooklyn, NY

Lev Zhurbin
New York, NY


American Lyric Theater

Arts for Art

Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians New York City Chapter Inc.

Bearthoven

Brooklyn Raga Massive

Contemporaneous

Dither

Emsemble Pampelmousse

Harvestworks

Jack Arts Inc.

JACK Quartet

Loadbang

Look + Listen

Mivos Quartet

MATA

Miolina

New Vintage Baroque

PRISM Quartet Inc.

PUBLIQuartet

Qubit

Resonant Bodies Festival

Righteousgirls

So Percussion

Sybarite5

Tak

Talea Ensemble

Talujon

The Jazz Gallery

Thingny

TIGUE

Wet Ink Ensemble

Yarn/Wire

YMusic


Argeo Ascani

Reginald Bain

Jennifer Margaret Barker

Jenny Bilfield

Samuel Burt

Tanya Calamoneri

Courteney Casey

Mark Cetilia

Shi An Co

Lisa Renee Coons

Gahlord Dewald

Avner Dorman

Andre Dowell

David Felberg

Garrett Fisher

Penelope Freeh

Jacqueline Gordon

Sydney Guillaume

Mara Helmuth

Barbara Heroux

Nancy Ives

Gina Izzo

Charles Jarden

Chen Hui Jen

Nathalie Joachim

Jennifer Jolley

Mari Kimura

Mikel Kuehn

Cheryl Leonard

Hélène  Lesterlin

David T. Little

Susanna Loewy

Sarah Lutman

Andrew McManus

Cameron Mesirow

Aakash Mittal

Haruko Nishimura

Shara Nova

Meg Okura

Laura Ortman

Sarah Outhwaite

Jay Pennington

Joseph Phillips

Shulamit Ran

Robert Reddy

Dave Rempis

Kelley Rourke

Alejandro Rutty

Laura Schwendginer

Sara Serpa

David Smooke

Laetitia Sonami

Gregory Spears

Macy Sullivan

Kathleen Tagg

Ohad Talmor

Rhonda Taylor

Kathleen van Bergen

Andrew Waggoner

Kate Weare

Marc Weidenbaum

Trevor Weston

Michael Woods


“Where Is Evil?” (a reaction to anatomy theater)
Oni Buchanan

“World Music” in the Era of Travel Bans
Steve Dollar

…But I Hate Modern Music
Maia Jasper White

2017 Grammy Nominees Announced
Frank J. Oteri

2017 Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Awards Announced
NewMusicBox Staff

30 Fellows Selected for Inaugural Blackbird Creative Lab
NewMusicBox Staff

5 Female Composers Among 9 Winners of 2017 BMI Student Composer Awards
Frank J. Oteri

A Band Apart: Resident Evil
Matthew Guerrieri

A Composition Competition and the Quest for Standard Repertoire
Patrick Zimmerli

A Fine Mess: An Emerging Opera Composer vs. the American New Opera Machine
Frank Pesci

A Man at Home On the Road—Remembering Mose Allison (1927-2016)
Ratzo B. Harris

A Model of Generosity and Wisdom—Remembering Karel Husa (1921-2016)
David Conte

A Universal Music
Aakash Mittal

Adam Rudolph: Languages of Rhythm
Frank J. Oteri

American Composers Orchestra Appoints Edward Yim as President
NewMusicBox Staff

American Composers Orchestra President Michael Geller Departing in December
NewMusicBox Staff

An Open Response to “…But I Hate Modern Music”
Kevin James

And the 89th Academy Award Composer Nominees Are…
NewMusicBox Staff

Andrew Norman Wins $100K Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition
NewMusicBox Staff

Andy Costello: The Power of the Unexpected
Molly Sheridan

ASCAP Announces 2017 Morton Gould Young Composer Award Recipients
Frank J. Oteri

Audio or It Didn’t Happen
Marc Weidenbaum

Auditory Tourism
Eve Sicular

Avner Dorman: Point of View, Personal Choice, and Duty
Frank J. Oteri

Banding Together
Kimberly Osberg

Béla Fleck: Things That Sound Right
Frank J. Oteri

Better Know a Composer: Disambiguation Edition
Molly Sheridan

Bringing a Residency Home
Dale Trumbore

California Sunshine: Remembering Bobby Hutcherson (1941-2016)
Joe Chambers

Candy Floss and Merry-Go-Rounds: Female Composers, Gendered Language, and Emotion
Sarah Kirkland Snider

Carlos Simon Wins $15,000 ACO Underwood Emerging Composer Commission
NewMusicBox Staff

Chamber Music America Announces $483,000 in Grants for New Works
NewMusicBox Staff

Chicago New Music as assemblage; or, why are we doing this?
Michael Lewanski

Chicago: What Makes It Great?
NewMusicBox Staff

Collective Arrangements: The Story of the Libera Composers Association
Kimberly Osberg

Coming Out (as a 5-to-9 Composer)
Ed Windels

Commemoration Music: Commemorating 9/11
Tim Rutherford-Johnson

Commemoration Music: Memorials and Monuments
Tim Rutherford-Johnson

Commemoration Music: Narrating 9/11
Tim Rutherford-Johnson

Commemoration Music: Working Out What’s Going On
Tim Rutherford-Johnson

Composer Advocacy Notebook: Staying Focused on Next
Frank J. Oteri

Composing and Motherhood
Emily Doolittle

Composing Interdependence—Songs Along the Nile
Priya Parrotta

Concerts in the Park and Modes of Listening to New Music
Patrick Zimmerli

Corigliano, Who Set Dylan Text, Reflects on Songwriter’s Nobel Lit Win
Molly Sheridan

Course Corrections
Dennis Tobenski

Creating Music about “The Greatest”: Muhammad Ali
Teddy Abrams

Daugherty’s Tales Of Hemingway Dominates New Music Grammy’s
NewMusicBox Staff

Decolonizing Our Music
Gary Ingle

Delivering the News You Need
NewMusicBox Staff

Do You Have What It Takes to be a 5-to-9 Composer?
Ed Windels

Du Yun Awarded 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Music
Frank J. Oteri

Ecological Wisdom, Living Soundscapes
Priya Parrotta

Eight Easy Steps to Becoming a Successful 5-to-9 Composer
Ed Windels

Eleanor Cory: What I Really Want To Do
Frank J. Oteri

Electroacoustic Music is Not About Sound
Eric Chasalow

Electroacoustic Music with Video: Comparison with Sound for Film
Alice Shields

Embracing Being a 5-to-9 Artist
Ed Windels

Experiencing Influences
Judy Bozone

Featuring Female Composers
Teddy Abrams

Five Timely Tax Tips for Musicians
Madison Goodwin

Follow the Music
Judy Bozone

Forty Years in New Music
Tom Steenland

Future of Publishing and Music Education Debated plus Awards Announced at MPA Annual Meeting
Frank J. Oteri

Getting close with Saariaho and L’amour de loin
Ronit Seter

Great Moments (for me) in Chicago New Music History
Patricia Morehead

Greg Lewis (a.k.a. Organ Monk): Music is a Weapon
Frank J. Oteri

How to Promote Your Album
Andrew Ousley

In Defense of Jazz
Patrick Zimmerli

In the Name of “Research”
Robert Paterson

Inspect the Unexpected: 10 Years of Counterstream Radio
Molly Sheridan

Interviewing the Interviewer: A Conversation with Ethan Iverson
Patrick Zimmerli

Is the Printed Circuit Board a Form of Musical Notation?
Marc Weidenbaum

Jazz and Classical—Musical, Cultural, Listening Differences
Patrick Zimmerli

John King: It All Becomes Music
Frank J. Oteri

Jonathan Kramer’s Gift
Robert Carl

Joshua Fried: Let’s Dance
Molly Sheridan

Julia Wolfe Named 2016 MacArthur Fellow
NewMusicBox Staff

Klezmer Beyond the Punchline
Eve Sicular

Kristin Norderval: Permanent and Impermanent Sonic Moments
Frank J. Oteri

Listening in a Time of Climate Change
Priya Parrotta

Little Band of Dreamers
Kathy L. Scherler

Living a Long-Form Life
Dale Trumbore

Made in Chicago: Original Sound, Original Voice
Molly Sheridan

Magical Yet Practical—Remembering Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016)
Paul Dresher

Making Music in Thailand
Judy Bozone

Martha Mooke: Walls, Windows, and Doors
Frank J. Oteri

Matthew Browne Wins ASCAP Foundation Nissim Prize
NewMusicBox Staff

Memories of Milton
Eric Chasalow

Michael Torke: Life After the Ceremony of Innocence
Frank J. Oteri

Mike Johnson: Thinking Plague
Frank J. Oteri

Music and (Social/Cultural) Resilience
Priya Parrotta

Music at the Root of Language
Judy Bozone

Musical America Announces 2017 Honorees
Frank J. Oteri

Musical Minds
Kathy L. Scherler

Musicians at Work: Ensemble Residencies as Social Relationships
John Pippen

My Musical Life in the United States
Austin Yip

My Oldest Friend and Best Collaborator: Remembering Richard Peaslee (1930-2016)
Kenneth Cavander

New Music USA Announces Nine New Additions to the Impact Fund Cohort
New Music USA

New Music USA Awards $310,820 to 60 Projects
NewMusicBox Staff

New Music Wants to Help
Jack Curtis Dubowsky

New York City Heartbeats
Aakash Mittal

NewMusicBox Mix: 2016 Staff Picks
New Music USA

Nicole Mitchell: Endless Possibilities
Frank J. Oteri

Notes on Belief, Creation, and the Un-serious. Seriously
Christopher Rountree

NYFA and EtM Announce Fellowships and Residencies to NY Composers
NewMusicBox Staff

On Being a “Choral Composer”
Dale Trumbore

On Being Named Composer of the Year by Musical America
Andrew Norman

On Contemporary Performance Practice, Melancholy, Subtle Activism, and Failure
Christopher Rountree

On Readers, Fakers, Bakers, Writers & Ruptures
Eve Sicular

One Size Doesn’t Fit All, but Can You Hand Tailor a Consortium?
Kimberly Osberg

Our Second Festival of American Music
Teddy Abrams

Philip Glass Among 2015 National Medal of Arts Recipients
NewMusicBox Staff

Photos, Videos, Website: The Tools You Need and How To Get Them
Andrew Ousley

Pitfalls of Living the Freelance Life
Dennis Tobenski

Preparing for Performance: What I Didn’t Know I Knew
Frank Pesci

Proudly Disruptive Yet Guilelessly Generous—Remembering Elliott Schwartz (1936-2016)
Daniel S. Godfrey

Questions of Identity
Aakash Mittal

Reclaiming the Missing Middle
Nathan Currier

Remembering Connie Crothers (1941-2016)
Ursel Schlicht

Seeking My Sonic Soul in the Land of Pre-Sliced Challah
Eve Sicular

Self-Plagiarism and the Evolution of Style
Dale Trumbore

Showcase of Six New Operas-In-Progress plus an Entire New Opera to be Presented in L.A.
NewMusicBox Staff

Shulamit Ran: Music Has Magical Powers
Frank J. Oteri

Sky Macklay: Why I Love Weird Contemporary Music
Frank J. Oteri

Smooth Sailing: Remembering Francis Thorne (1922-2017)
Rosalie Calabrese

So You Want To Host A Composition Competition
Chris Sivak

Some Reflections on Transitioning Out of Being a “Young Composer”
Aaron Gervais

Some Stuff I’ve Learned Writing Music for Advertising: References, Briefs, and Conference Calls
Ravi Krishnaswami

Some Stuff I’ve Learned Writing Music for Advertising—Why I Keep Doing This
Ravi Krishnaswami

Some Thoughts About Dorico The Morning After
Aaron Holloway-Nahum

Songs of Hope
Kathy L. Scherler

Sounds of Futures’ Past
George Grella Jr

Speak Now: A Habit of Hearing
John Wykoff

Speak Now: Amplifying Our Voices
Ed Harsh

Speak Now: D.C. Dispatch—Arts in the Time of Trump
Joel Friedman

Speak Now: How Classical Music Got Me Woke
Ashley Jackson

Speak Now: It Is Time to Create
Meg Wilhoite

Speak Now: Our Job as Composers Has Now Changed
Mohammed Fairouz

Speak Now: Turning Around, Turning Away, and Turning Over
Kristin Kuster

Stream the 2016 Bang on a Can Marathon
Sam Reising

Street Music, Noise, and the City of Joy
Aakash Mittal

Stuff I Learned Writing Music for Advertising—Problem Solver, Not Widget Maker
Ravi Krishnaswami

Stuff I Learned Writing Music for Advertising—The Evolving Ecosystem and Tearing Down Walls
Ravi Krishnaswami

Summer Residency Snapshots: Into the Workshop
Michael Compitello

Summer Residency Snapshots: Lessons in Dynamic Collaboration
Michael Compitello

Summer Residency Snapshots: The Composer / Performer Mind Meld
Michael Compitello

Summer Residency Snapshots: Where Trust Meets Productivity
Michael Compitello

Summer Rewind: 10 Posts To Read Again
Molly Sheridan

Support Systems
Dennis Tobenski

Taking The Plunge
Dennis Tobenski

Taking Tweed Seriously—Lessons for the Emerging Opera Composer
Frank Pesci

The Basics of Publicity
Andrew Ousley

The Big Man with the Big Sound–Remembering Arthur Blythe (1940-2017)
Oliver Lake

The Big, and Ever-Present, “What’s Next?”
Frank Pesci

The Books In My Life
Christopher Rountree

The Electric Heat of Creativity—Remembering Donald Buchla (1937-2016)
Morton Subotnick

The Empowering Art of Music
Kathy L. Scherler

The Generalization Generation
Isaac Schankler

The Man With Qualities: Remembering My Friend, Daniel Brewbaker (1951-2017)
Lee Kesselman

The Role of the Mentor
Teddy Abrams

Third New Music Gathering Announces May Line-Up
Molly Sheridan

Time Is Flat
Patrick Zimmerli

Top 10 Things to Know About Social Media Marketing
Andrew Ousley

Trump Budget Proposal Eliminates NEA
Molly Sheridan

Turn the Volume Down, Now
Bruce Hodges

Twenty Seasons of Cutting Edge Concerts
Victoria  Bond

Undisciplined Music
Jessica Aszodi

Uniquely Together: The Chicago Paradox
Seth Boustead

Up Next
Kimberly Osberg

Vinyl Fever
James Matheson

Wadada Leo Smith Receives $25K Mohn Career Achievement Award
NewMusicBox Staff

What 4’33” Teaches Us
Andy Costello

What Happens When Composers Make Opera
Aaron Siegel

What Is Music’s Comic Book Superpower?
Marc Weidenbaum

What We Believe
Ed Harsh

When Jazz Was Cool
George Grella Jr

Whither Los Angeles: The Émigrés
Alicia Byer

Whither Los Angeles? New Music in Tinseltown
Alicia Byer

Who are you championing today?
Molly Sheridan

Who Is In the Club?
Jeffrey Mumford

Whose Classical Music? Assumptions and Representation in Online Participatory Projects
Joanna Helms

Why the 21st Century is the Most Exciting Time for Music
Frank J. Oteri

Yarn/Wire: From The Ground Level
Frank J. Oteri

You Need a Better Bio
Angela Myles Beeching

Your Better Bio: Describing your music and your self
Angela Myles Beeching

Your Better Bio: Getting Real & Covering the Bases
Angela Myles Beeching

Your Better Bio: Vivid and Engaging
Angela Myles Beeching

Your Computer is Listening. Are you?
Noah Stern Weber


ENDOWMENT

 

Mary Flagler Cary
Charitable Trust

The Aaron Copland
Fund for Music

The Gladys Krieble
Delmas Foundation

Baisley Powell Elebash Fund

The Ford Foundation

The William and Flora
Hewlett Foundation

Francis Goelet Charitable
Lead Trusts

The Andrew W.
Mellon Foundation

The National Endowment
for the Arts

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund

The Helen F. Whitaker Fund

Anonymous

 

INSTITUTIONS

$100,000+

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

New York State Council
on the Arts

NYC Department of
Cultural Affairs

The Scherman Foundation’s Katharine S. and Axel G. Rosin Fund

$50,000-99,999

Booth Ferris Foundation

The Aaron Copland
Fund for Music

The Alice M. Ditson Fund

The National Endowment
for the Arts

$10,000-$49,999

The Achelis & Bodman Foundation

The Amphion Foundation

The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation

Francis Goelet Trust

The Getty Foundation

Howard Gilman Foundation

$3,000-$9,999

ASCAP Corporation

ASCAP Foundation

BMI Foundation

Pennsylvania Council
on the Arts

$1,000-$2,999

BMI Corporation

Rodgers and Hammerstein Foundation

COMPOSERS LEADERSHIP
CIRCLE

Leaders ($5,000+)

John Adams
John Harbison
Steven Stucky

Advocates ($2,000 -$4,999)

Daniel S. Godfrey
Augusta Read Thomas

Endorsers ($500-$1,999)

John Luther Adams
Samuel Adler
Daniel Asia
Martin Brody
Donald Crockett
Michael Daugherty
Orlando Jacinto Garcia
Donald Grantham
Joel Harrison
Stephen Hartke
Jake Heggie
Jennifer Higdon
Pierre Jalbert
Benjamin B. Johnston
Debra Kaye
Lori Laitman
David Liptak
David Ludwig
Steven Mackey
Beata Moon
Robert Paterson
Mark W. Phillips
Frank Proto
Shulamit Ran
Steve Reich
Elena L. Ruehr
Michael Schelle
Elliott Schwartz
Laura Schwendinger
Alex Shapiro
Judith Shatin
Stephen Taylor
Frank Ticheli
Donald Walker
Dan Welcher
James H. Willey
Ellen T. Zwilich
Anonymous

Individuals

New Music Connect

John Bierbusse
Teddy Dean Boys
Tom Brener and
Inbal Segev
Dorothea Endicott
John McCormick
Justus and Elizabeth Schlichting
Joseph A. and
Nancy Meli Walker
Ms. Cecille Wasserman

$10,000+

Tom Brener and Inbal Segev
Dorothea Endicott
Mr. Alan Kornberg
Frederick and AlexandraPeters
Mr. and Ms. Justus and Elizabeth Schlichting
Joseph A. and Nancy Meli Walker

$3,000-$9,999

John Adams and Deborah O’Grady
Tim Gallagher
Ms. Marya Martin and Mr. Kenneth Davidson
A. Slade and Phyllis Mills
Barbara A. Petersen
Ms. Cynthia Sargent

$1,200-$2,999

Mr. John Bierbusse
Teddy Dean Boys
Mr. Aaron Egigian
Daniel S. Godfrey
Mr. Ed Harsh
Ms. Harriet Kaufman
Kristin and Theirry Lancino
Ms. Gayle Morgan
Mr. and Ms. Linda and Stuart Nelson
Ms. Frances Richard
Esa-Pekka Salonen
Mr. Paul J. Sperry
Michel and Caroline Zaleski

$600-$1,199

Mr. Samuel Adler
Mrs. Susan Bienkowski and Mr. Wang Lee
NancyBell Coe
Ms. Jennifer Higdon
Leslie Kandell
James Kendrick
Ms. Lori Laitman
Maestro David Alan Miller
Thomas W. Morris
Ms. Alex Shapiro
Matías Tarnopolsky

$300-$599

Astrid and John Baumgardner
Ms. Emily Bookwalter
Mr. Anthony B. Creamer III
Susan Feder
Mr. David C Felder
Mr. Mitch Gillette
Donald Grantham
Amy Iwano
Debra Kaye
Ms. Catherine Luening
Martin and Lucy Murray
David Newman
Mr. Mark W. Phillips
Mr. Frank Proto
Mr. Steve Reich
Dr. Elena L. Ruehr
Mr. Lawrence Tarlow
Stephen Taylor
Mr. Dan Welcher
Mr. James H. Willey
Mr. Richard Wilson
Chen Yi and Zhou Long
Ellen T Zwilich
Anonymous

$120-$299

Mr. Ted Allen
Dr. Dwight D. Andrews
Mr. Daniel Asia
Ms. Nancy Barry
Dr. Nancy Bogen
Mr. David Borden
Deirdre Chadwick
Theodore Chapin
Ms. Joanne Hubbard Cossa
Mr. Donald Crockett
Mr. Daniel Crozier
Mr. Conrad Cummings
Mr. Michael Daugherty
Mr. Richard Einhorn
Mr. Paul A. Epstein
Peter Golub
Samuel and Judy Hope
Lydia G. Kontos
Paul Lansky
Mr. Richard LeSueur
Mr. David Liptak
Mr. Barry Mandel
Mr. Ed Matthew
Mr. Harold Meltzer
Nico Muhly
Maury Newburger
Ursula Oppens
Mr. Marc D. Ostrow
Vivian Perlis
Neva Pilgrim
Dr. Robert Xavier-Rodriguez
Mr. Peter Rubardt
Ms. Lucy A. Shelton
Susan Sinclair
Maestro Stanislaw Skrowaczewski
Louise K. Smith
Sarah Snider
Ms. Deborah Steinglass
Mr. Robert Sutherland
Ms. Dawn Upshaw
Libby Van Cleve and Jack Vees
Ms. Jennifer Wada
Mr. Donald Burke Walker
Mr. Mark Winges
Wesley York and Robert Scrofani
Judith Lang Zaimont
Anonymous (3)

$60-$119

Mr. William Alves
Mr. T.J. Anderson
Mr. Lawrence Axelrod
Belinda Reynolds and Dan Becker
Ms. Eve Beglarian
David Biedenbender
Mr. William Hayes Biggs
Ellen Bodow
Mr. Allen Brings
Mr. Philip C. Brunelle
Ms. Gloria Cheng
Mr. John Corigliano
Eleanor Cory
Mr. Noah Creshevsky
Dr. Michael G. Cunningham
Mr. Ralph Grierson
Stanley Grill
William Holab
Mr. Joel Horwich
Ms. Felicity A. Howlett
Ms. Laura Kaminsky
Gerri Kirchner
Ms. Tania Leon
Mr. Arthur Levering
Harold Lichtin
Clara Longstreth
Dr. Sasha Matson
Ms. Janice Misurell-Mitchell
Eric Nathan
Mr. John Nuechterlein
Jayn Rosenfeld
Mr. Carl Schimmel
Mr. Robert B. Sirota
Mr. Thomas Steenland
United Way of Central New York
Marina Voyskun
Anonymous

$1-$59

Robert and Linda Attiyeh
Mrs. Lillian Barbash
Ms. Carol Barnett
William Bolcom and Joan Morris
Thomas D. Brosh
Ms. Nancy S. Clarke
Adam Cordle
Miranda Cuckson
Ms. Mary H. DuPree
Gretta Harley
Mr. Peter Homans
Mr. Pierre Jalbert
Mr. Vance R. Koven
Anne Lanzilotti
Sharan Leventhal
Matthew Levy
Maia McCormick
Tristan and Lesley Perich
Kala Pierson
Luke Rackers
Glenn Reed
John Robinson
Ms. Patsy Rogers
Nan Shannon
Gerald Starlight
Mr. Steven Tintweiss
Mr. David Vayo
Annette Weisenburger
Mr. John Zielinski
Anonymous (3)


Total Revenue :
$2,272,789

Total Expenses :
$2,271,455
(including $884,174 in grants to the field)

Endowment value as of 6/30/15:
$16,416,984


Officers

 

Frederick Peters, Chair

Kristin Lancino, Vice Chair

Matías Tarnopolsky, Secretary

Joseph Walker, Treasurer

Ed Harsh, President and CEO

Trustees

 

Theodore Chapin

Dorothea Endicott

Tim Gallagher

Daniel S. Godfrey

Amy Iwano

Harriet Kaufman

James Kendrick

Alan Kornberg

Marya Martin

Phyllis Mills

Gayle Morgan

Barbara Petersen

Frances Richard

Esa-Pekka Salonen

 

Steve Stucky, Founding Member in Memoriam

Steve Reich, Trustee Emeritus

Program Council

 

Derek Bermel

Seth Boustead

Sarah Cahill

Michael Ching

Christine Clark

Jean Cook

Reena Esmail

Gabriela Lena Frank

Jennifer Jolley

Laura Karpman

George Lewis

Jimmy Lopez

Paula Matthusen

Harold Meltzer

Robert Xavier Rodriguez

Alex Shapiro

Staff

Madeline Bohm
Software Engineer and Designer

Kristen Doering
Grantmaking Manager

Eddy Ficklin
Senior Software Engineer

Ed Harsh
President and CEO

Shayna Jeffers
Finanace Manager

Brad Lenz
Development Manager

Eileen Mack
(Starting 10/01/2016)
Junior Software Engineer

Frank J. Oteri
Composer Advocate, and Co-Editor, NewMusicBox

Sam Reising
Community Platform Strategist and Grantmaking Manager

Molly Sheridan
Director of Content, and Co-Editor, NewMusicBox

Deborah Steinglass
Director of Development

Blake Whiteley (Through 05/01/2017)
Development Assistant

Scott Winship
Director of Grantmaking Programs


Performance of Project RAu
(Photo by Murat Durum)

Performance of Project RAu
(Photo by Sylvia Stagg Giuliano)

Portrait of Diametrically Composed Organizer Allison Loggins-Hull
(Photo by Erin Patrice O’Brien. 2015)

From Our Roots
(Photos by Brittany Wait and Jacob Greenfeld)

Charmaine Lee at Experimental Music Studio
(Photos by Colin Troop)

Splinter Reeds
(Photo by Aubrey Trinnaman)

Eleanor Cory
(Photo by Molly Sheridan)

Performance of Lifted
(Photo by Brian Mengini)

Screaming Plastic
(Photo by Sarah Bailey)

Suchan Kim and James W. Guido performing for Sign & Sing
(Photo by Al Foote III)

Sakura Cello Quintet
(Photo by David Frey. 2017)

Performance of Potential
(Photo by Colin Lowry and Eric Graham)


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